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NEWS
August 31, 2005
Tip of the week: The employee handbook Having an up-to-date, well-written employee handbook benefits the employer, front-line supervisor and employees. It promotes effective employee relations, communication and morale. There are two fundamental objectives of an employee handbook. The first is to clearly indicate what the employer expects from its employees. This includes standard policies and procedures. It provides the framework for an employer to consistently and fairly manage its human resources.
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NEWS
August 31, 2005
Tip of the week: The employee handbook Having an up-to-date, well-written employee handbook benefits the employer, front-line supervisor and employees. It promotes effective employee relations, communication and morale. There are two fundamental objectives of an employee handbook. The first is to clearly indicate what the employer expects from its employees. This includes standard policies and procedures. It provides the framework for an employer to consistently and fairly manage its human resources.
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BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | May 2, 2004
We are a company of about 30 people. One of our employees is on maternity leave. When she returns, do we have to reinstate her to the job she held before the leave? The answer is crucial because her replacement does a much better job, and we would like to keep her in the position. Can't we just offer the returning employee a job in another department? Because of your company's size, your question doesn't have easy answers. You're too small to fall under the jurisdiction of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act, which covers companies with at least 50 employees.
NEWS
April 6, 2005
How to significantly cut your business traveling Q. In a job that requires frequent travel, how do I manage to be away from home less and still do my job? H.U., Baltimore A. The first thing to look at is whether the job really requires that much travel. Working from the home office is not only easier on you, but far more economical for your company. Once you've established face-to-face relationships with your out-of-town contacts, a lot of tasks that once required travel can now be accomplished from your home office through wise use of the telephone, Internet, instant messaging and other electronic means.
NEWS
April 6, 2005
How to significantly cut your business traveling Q. In a job that requires frequent travel, how do I manage to be away from home less and still do my job? H.U., Baltimore A. The first thing to look at is whether the job really requires that much travel. Working from the home office is not only easier on you, but far more economical for your company. Once you've established face-to-face relationships with your out-of-town contacts, a lot of tasks that once required travel can now be accomplished from your home office through wise use of the telephone, Internet, instant messaging and other electronic means.
NEWS
October 30, 1992
Workers turn out for personnel hearingAbout 30 Carroll County employees attented a public hearing Tuesday on the county's proposed personnel ordinance.The ordinance would revise and update Carroll's existing personnel ordinance and incorpiorate its employee handbook into one document, said county Attorney Charles W. "Chuck" Thompson Jr. He said there was some concern about layoffs because of some rewording in the proposed ordinance. But he told workers that there are "no expectations of layoffs at this point in time."
NEWS
By CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN and CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN,NEWSDAY | March 29, 2006
I was a senior business executive with a Fortune 30 company. I ranked among the top 100 salespeople out of 55,000, despite being there for just 20 months. Because things were going so well for me, I turned down four job offers in 2004. Then early this year a new vice president joined the department. He wanted me to move to the company's office in the Midwest. I agreed and had begun planning to relocate with my family. But a month later, when my family and I were in the throes of planning for our big move, he called me in and fired me. His about-face has caused my family and me tremendous emotional turmoil.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2006
A Maryland School for the Deaf employee was directly involved in awarding $107,000 in lawn maintenance work to a company owned by her brother-in-law, an apparent violation of state ethics law, according to an audit released yesterday. State ethics laws generally prohibit employees from participating in matters in which close relatives have an interest. The woman was terminated and no longer works for the school, according to the audit. The matter was referred to the attorney general's office for review, the report says.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | August 22, 2004
My husband and I are adopting a child from Russia. We don't have definite travel dates yet, but could get the word within the next few weeks. Once we bring our child home, I would like to take a leave of eight to 12 weeks. What rights do I have as an employee of a small firm? I believe the Family and Medical Leave Act applies only to companies with at least 50 employees. Ours is much smaller. My boss doesn't seem receptive to my suggestions, such as letting me work from home or hiring a temp to cover for me. What happens if I leave?
NEWS
By LYN BROOKE | August 15, 1994
I grew up in a family that enjoyed baseball. But with the exception of my sister, who plans her vacations around her goal to see a game in every major league park, we considered it a pastime rather than a religion.So I find it difficult to wrap my mind around the salary figures involved in the baseball strike, and to understand the attention it's getting.I wonder what might happen if comparable intensity was given to balancing the federal budget? Not a likely happening, but the Concord Coalition would like to generate a fraction of that interest and passion.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | May 2, 2004
We are a company of about 30 people. One of our employees is on maternity leave. When she returns, do we have to reinstate her to the job she held before the leave? The answer is crucial because her replacement does a much better job, and we would like to keep her in the position. Can't we just offer the returning employee a job in another department? Because of your company's size, your question doesn't have easy answers. You're too small to fall under the jurisdiction of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act, which covers companies with at least 50 employees.
FEATURES
By DEBORAH JACOBS and DEBORAH JACOBS,Chronicle Features | September 10, 1995
True or false: What you do after work is none of the boss's business.The answer ought to be "true," but in most cases the law doesn't say so. That means, in effect, a boss can fire you because he or she disapproves of any number of your after-work activities, from volunteering for a political campaign to dating a co-worker.Ideally, companies should let you know up front what the rules are -- through a memo, employee handbook or policy statement. Unfortunately, it doesn't always happen that way.Take the case of Judy Pasch, who fell in love with a co-worker at VTC Christal Radio in New York City.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
Harbor Cruises Ltd. violated federal labor laws by pressuring workers to reject a 1994 union move to organize service employees on the Lady Baltimore and Bay Lady, and later firing union activists, the National Labor Relations Board ruled yesterday.By ruling in favor of the union that was seeking to organize waiters, waitresses, bartenders and galley staff who work aboard the two Baltimore cruise ships, the NLRB affirmed the decision last June by federal Administrative Law Judge John H. West.
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