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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 28, 1995
NEW YORK -- On that fog-shrouded morning 50 years ago today, Therese Fortier was at work literally above the clouds on the 79th floor of the tallest and most-famous building on Earth.The secretary from Queens loved working in the Empire State Building. On clear days, you could see far into New Jersey from her desk near the southwest side of the building. On stormy days the weather put on a show right "outside the windows," she said.That made the death and destruction that suddenly engulfed her and her co-workers all the more horrible and memorable.
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NEWS
December 20, 2013
If there's one place which has absolutely no right to judge others, it is Baltimore City ("Columbia drab? Duh," Dec. 16). And I say that kindly - and lovingly. I grew up in Baltimore, and I'm the first to defend it. Who better than a former citizen to understand a city's beauty and its flaws? Baltimore has always been odd, if not downright weird. I was raised on stories of farming pigs in chain-linked Hampden gardens. I ate shrimp salad sandwiches, smiling at the toothless and nigh incomprehensible wash-and-set dinner ladies at Cross Street Market.
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NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Contributing Writer | November 21, 1994
Early Friday, Charles Denmead and his 11-year-old son, Michael, boarded a bus that would take them camping -- not to the woods of Western Maryland, but to the 86th floor of the Empire State Building."
SPORTS
By Chris Erskine and Tribune Olympic Bureau | February 14, 2010
VANCOUVER - Some things you (probably) didn't know about the Winter Games: •Olympic Village athletes do their own laundry. •To be included, a sport must be practiced in at least 25 nations. •Torch bearers, who paid $350 for the propane devices, were able to keep them when they were done. • NBC's Olympic fanfare is called "Bugler's Dream." Its conductor? John Williams. It's composer? Leo Arnaud. •Twenty-three U.S. team members are parents - six moms, 17 dads.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - Developer and casino operator Donald Trump, preparing to sell the Empire State Building for about $60 million, says four investment groups have expressed interest in the New York landmark. One of the suitors is Empire State Building Associates, an investment company organized and managed by Wien & Malkin LLP, whose principals include Peter Malkin. The investment company already holds a 115-year master lease on the tower and wants to acquire the building and the underlying land, according to a proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | May 20, 1991
NEW YORK -- The Empire State Building is for sale, and for a mere $45 million to $50 million, a pittance for a prime property in midtown Manhattan.But there's a catch -- and it's 85 years long.Until January 2076, the 102-story building is tied up in a complex leasing arrangement that will prevent its new owner from taking control of the property.The arrangement is, in effect, an annuity that has been paying the current owner, Prudential Life Insurance Company of America, about $3.4 million a year.
NEWS
By Charles V. Bagli and By Charles V. Bagli,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 2001
Three powerful real estate figures are battling once again for control of the Empire State Building, the 102-story tower on Fifth Avenue that recently regained its status as New York's tallest skyscraper. The three - Irving Schneider, Peter L. Malkin and Leona Helmsley - are inextricably bound by their control of the Empire State Building through a complicated latticework of partnerships and leases. Each of the three has sued the other at one time or another over the last six years. The latest skirmish comes as Malkin is trying to buy the property outright from a Japanese group led by Donald J. Trump for about $60 million.
NEWS
By Galina Vainblat and Galina Vainblat,Contributing Writer | November 15, 1993
"You can see McDonald's from up here, but you still can't see Pizza Hut," said one enthusiastic Boy Scout after looking down from the 86th floor.On Friday, more than 40 Boy Scouts from Troop 361 of Columbia and Troop 127 of Wayne, N.J., participated in the Empire State Building's annual overnight "Urban Camp-out" on the building's observatory deck.For many, it was the first time they had ever been in New York."I've never been this high up. I've been up at the Eiffel Tower at Kings Dominion, but it's nothing like this," said Columbia resident Joseph Stinchcomb.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff | December 21, 1997
NEW YORK -- Of modern American society, there is one immutable truth: With a TV camera trained on them, people are capable of astonishingly goofy behavior.Some will windmill their arms and scream "Hi, Mom!" and hold up their index fingers to indicate they're No. 1. Some will elbow for position like a fat man in a buffet line and preen. Some will giggle uncontrollably. Sometimes you wonder if the camera isn't emitting some low-level radiation that causes people to lose their minds.All this occurs to me as I jump from a taxi into the pre-dawn darkness outside NBC's famous glass-cornered "Today" show studio at 49th Street and Rockefeller Plaza.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Barry and Dan Barry,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 2005
NEW YORK - It rises like a glistening flute of champagne from the beer-bottle skyline, as if in toast to a New Year's mix of emotions: hope and loss; love found and love betrayed; what can be and what almost was. And when you see it, you know instantly, absolutely, where the movie wants you to be. Ah, the Chrysler Building: Manhattan. Not even the Empire State Building is as immediately identifiable, or can say so much so quickly. Shimmering in the morning sun or under spotlight beams at midnight, the 1930 Chrysler Building, which marked its 75th anniversary Friday, can evoke everything from East Side sophistication to Big City hollowness.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2009
Last week, I took my son on the value bus from Baltimore to New York to see his sister perform in a New York University show. We rode the bus because it is: 1) always an adventure; 2) an interesting introduction to other people's fragrant lunches; and 3) really cheap. You see, I have this ridiculous goal of one day spending a 24-hour period in New York City and spending less than $300 - including travel, food, lodging and sightseeing. I have yet to achieve this goal, but when I do, I plan to throw a huge gala on the little dirt patch at the O'Donnell Street cutoff where you wait for the "Double Happyness" bus. You will all be invited to celebrate this feat of ingenuity and economy: water and saltines will be served.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | April 5, 2007
NEW YORK -- IF YOU'RE EVER LOOKING TO TAKE IN A tourist attraction where employees bark at you incessantly, herd you through one velvet-rope line after another and try to sell you cheesy, overpriced souvenir photos at the end of your visit, have I got the place for you. I know, I know. That pretty much applies to any tourist attraction in the country, doesn't it? But in this case we're talking about the world-famous Empire State Building and its 86th-floor Observatory, which towers nearly a quarter of a mile above Fifth Avenue and offers a spectacular view of Manhattan and beyond, assuming you haven't passed out from hunger during the wait to get up there.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Barry and Dan Barry,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 2005
NEW YORK - It rises like a glistening flute of champagne from the beer-bottle skyline, as if in toast to a New Year's mix of emotions: hope and loss; love found and love betrayed; what can be and what almost was. And when you see it, you know instantly, absolutely, where the movie wants you to be. Ah, the Chrysler Building: Manhattan. Not even the Empire State Building is as immediately identifiable, or can say so much so quickly. Shimmering in the morning sun or under spotlight beams at midnight, the 1930 Chrysler Building, which marked its 75th anniversary Friday, can evoke everything from East Side sophistication to Big City hollowness.
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 23, 2003
NEW YORK -- Halt the competition. Yet another world-class architect has created yet another design for Ground Zero. It is futuristic in the extreme, nearly as tall as the Empire State Building, topped with a star and polychromed in tile and marble. And it resembles nothing so much as a stalagmite -- or a Buck Rogers rocket ship. The architect? Antonio Gaudi, the Barcelona visionary who was the greatest Spanish exponent of the Art Nouveau style. And the plan, for a New York hotel, was conceived in 1908.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 1, 2002
NEW YORK - The Empire State Building, 30 Rockefeller Center and five other "trophy" New York skyscrapers have lower vacancy rates than other less well-known New York office buildings, a study found, a sign demand for prestige space is overcoming fear of further terrorism. The buildings had a combined vacancy rate of 4.3 percent as of Sept. 30, compared with 6.7 percent at other Midtown Manhattan properties with comparable finishes and amenities, a report by Torto Wheaton Research showed.
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 2002
NEW YORK - The most subversive of all the fun facts about the Flatiron Building, which marked its centennial Oct. 1, is that it does not truly replicate the shape of a turn-of-the-century household flatiron - which would have been curved at the sides like the prow of a ship. Instead, the famous three-sided building at the intersection of Broadway, Fifth Avenue and 23rd Street - one of New York's oldest surviving skyscrapers - forms a geometrically perfect, straight-edged right triangle.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | January 3, 1991
NO MATTER what you may have heard, I am not sulky about being omitted from New York magazine's list of the treasures of New York City.This rumor was probably started by a busybody who eavesdropped on my conversation with David Halberstam during the opera intermission the other night at Lincoln Center.All I said to Halberstam was, "I was a little surprised that when New York magazine asked you to name one of the treasures of New York you named Jules Feiffer instead of me.""A little surprised" is all I said.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2001
NEW YORK - After they learned of the first crash into the World Trade Center last week, many in the upper reaches of the Empire State Building rushed to their windows to catch sight of the catastrophe. From there, they had a clear view of the north tower in flames, and before they could fully register that calamity, they watched in disbelief as the second plane slammed into the south tower. Like millions elsewhere, they instantly recognized that this was no accident; it was an attack. But in the Empire State Building, there was an ancillary, terrifying concern.
NEWS
By Charles V. Bagli and By Charles V. Bagli,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 2001
Three powerful real estate figures are battling once again for control of the Empire State Building, the 102-story tower on Fifth Avenue that recently regained its status as New York's tallest skyscraper. The three - Irving Schneider, Peter L. Malkin and Leona Helmsley - are inextricably bound by their control of the Empire State Building through a complicated latticework of partnerships and leases. Each of the three has sued the other at one time or another over the last six years. The latest skirmish comes as Malkin is trying to buy the property outright from a Japanese group led by Donald J. Trump for about $60 million.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2001
NEW YORK - After they learned of the first crash into the World Trade Center last week, many in the upper reaches of the Empire State Building rushed to their windows to catch sight of the catastrophe. From there, they had a clear view of the north tower in flames, and before they could fully register that calamity, they watched in disbelief as the second plane slammed into the south tower. Like millions elsewhere, they instantly recognized that this was no accident; it was an attack. But in the Empire State Building, there was an ancillary, terrifying concern.
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