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NEWS
December 22, 2011
While reading the account of soldiers leaving Iraq ("U.S takes its leave from Iraq," Dec. 18), I was struck once again at the illegitimate question that is so often asked about the Iraq war: Was it worth it? That may be a proper question to ask when a financial investment is evaluated but not a suitable question when violence is initiated. Empathy seems to be non-existent. Imagine if the tables were turned and Iraq did to us what we did to them. What if you lost your family and business from Iraq attacking us and pundits from Iraq sat around a table with their lattes and discussed whether it was worth it?
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 25, 2014
One of the unsung blessings of Twitter is the way it continually reminds us that willful ignorance is alive and thriving in the American body politic. In the past week, we were treated to widely retweeted photos purporting to show Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol throwing a gang sign. The first controversial image showed up on an unvetted CNN social media webpage called iReport, and Internet trolls took it from there. The only problem is that the hand sign in question was the greeting of Kappa Alpha Psi, a historically black fraternity of which Johnson is a member.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | January 7, 2010
Sheila Dixon's natural instinct has always been to fight. She battled to become City Council president, and, later, mayor of Baltimore. She attained the office in 2007 after a decade of preparation. But on Wednesday, Dixon resisted her hard-edged inclinations and pleaded guilty to a charge of perjury, halting a political career built through steely determination and an ability to connect with average people in her hometown. At a City Hall news conference convened after her final courtroom appearance, Dixon displayed a little-glimpsed vulnerable side, choking on tears and taking some responsibility for her legal woes.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 21, 2014
What next? That's what should concern us now. When the nightly dance of angry protesters, opportunistic criminals and inept police clashing over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown finally ends, what steps should civic-minded people take to address the ongoing abuse of African Americans by the criminal injustice system? Not just in Ferguson, Mo., but in America? There will be no shortage of good ideas: dashboard cameras, community policing, the hiring of more black cops, the removal of military hardware from police arsenals, sensitivity training.
NEWS
February 16, 2011
Reading the editorial, "Vote for history" (Feb. 16) made me wonder. Do our legislators vote with their brains or their hearts? Personally, I have a great deal of love and understanding for those who choose alternative lifestyles. I also have a great deal of love and understanding for drug addicts, unwed mothers, the criminally insane, etc. I would hope that our legislators who may share in my personal "feelings" would use their intelligence in casting their votes now and in the future.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | October 12, 1997
HOW WOULD YOU feel if someone did that to you?"I have asked that question so many times, I am the one with no feelings -- in my lips or tongue."How do you think she would feel if she could hear what you are saying about her? How would you like it if someone said that about your hair/pimples/father?" (Fill in the blank.)I am a car-pooling mother of two, trapped in a matrix of rides to pools, fields and baseball diamonds, and, unless I turn the radio up very loud, most of what I hear is kids ripping other kids.
NEWS
By Diana Schaub | June 14, 2009
Why do judges wear robes? Does their peculiar mode of dress tell us anything about the ideal character and qualities of a judge? Do the robes indicate whether "empathy" - a quality highly touted by President Barack Obama in his appointment of Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court - ought to figure in the judicial temperament? From time immemorial, the special quality of a judge has been thought to be impartiality. Lady Justice is always pictured blindfolded. She does not see persons; if she did, she might empathize with some and not others.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
Once, gym teachers scared me. They had field hockey sticks and knew how to use them. They made me wear ridiculous bloomers and pleated pinafores and could tell if I had tried to fake taking a shower. Worst of all, they taught gym. I hated gym. Decades later, things couldn't be more different. Not that I'm an Olympian, but I like to work out. And much to my amazement, I enjoy taking several classes at the gym, in particular BodyPump - a weightlifting regime - and spinning. I no longer fear my instructors.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2003
A baby who sees his father burst into tears suddenly starts crying himself, his sad little face the very picture of misery. Is this empathy? Or is it, as psychologist Andrew Meltzoff thinks, something less exalted, such as emotional "contagion"? A slightly more evolved toddler watches her mother wince and yell "ouch!" after hitting herself with a hammer. The child picks up a teddy bear to give it to her mother. Now, that has to be empathy, right? The child not only knew what her mother was feeling, she had an appropriately compassionate response.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 28, 2009
Why make this complicated? President Barack Obama prefers Supreme Court justices who will violate their oath of office. And he hopes Sonia Sotomayor is the right Hispanic woman for the job. Here's the oath Supreme Court justices must take: "I, (name), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me as (title)
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | January 26, 2014
I know and like New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, the man who has accomplished so much while leading a blue leaning, labor dominated northeastern state. And so it was with much angst that I watched the media circus (dressed up as a press conference) in the immediate aftermath of "Bridgegate" - the revenge play wherein two senior Christie staffers ordered lane closures on the congested George Washington Bridge - allegedly to punish the Democratic mayor of Fort Lee, N.J., who failed to support the governor's re-election campaign.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 16, 2013
Wednesday afternoon, as his former colleagues in Congress considered a deal to avoid a national crisis, Wayne Gilchrest sat in his office in a place called Knocks Folly on Maryland's Eastern Shore and watched a fox run across a field. That's not a bad way to spend an autumn afternoon — gazing out the window of an 18th-century house in Kent County, resting after a day spent preparing for the arrival of schoolchildren eager to plant trees or paddle a canoe on the Sassafras River.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
I am in total agreement with Kim R. Filer ("Authorities too quick to kill rescued baby fox" May 7). This poor baby fox was doomed from birth. First by an accident that put him in harm's way and then by "authorities" who had to show their big nasty hand of power to kill. How sad for those who have so little care and empathy for creatures who are at mercy of men who couldn't even take a week to see if the fox was a rabies carrier before snuffing out his little life. Mary-Jo Dale, Baltimore
NEWS
September 18, 2012
If 47 percent of American voters weren't in the bag for President Barack Obama before, they certainly are now. The video of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney writing off nearly half of the American population as layabouts with no feeling of personal responsibility, a victimhood complex and an addiction to government services may hit a new high-water mark for self-inflicted wounds in an electoral campaign, not just because it was insulting but...
NEWS
December 22, 2011
While reading the account of soldiers leaving Iraq ("U.S takes its leave from Iraq," Dec. 18), I was struck once again at the illegitimate question that is so often asked about the Iraq war: Was it worth it? That may be a proper question to ask when a financial investment is evaluated but not a suitable question when violence is initiated. Empathy seems to be non-existent. Imagine if the tables were turned and Iraq did to us what we did to them. What if you lost your family and business from Iraq attacking us and pundits from Iraq sat around a table with their lattes and discussed whether it was worth it?
NEWS
November 12, 2011
As completely disheartened and enraged as many of us still are over the senseless, tragic, brutal murder of Stephen Pitcairn last year, this week's article about Lavelva Merritt's trial ("Woman who helped rob Hopkins' Pitcairn sentenced to 15 years," Nov. 8) opens the floodgates for an equally strong reaction. Ms. Merritt is quoted as having said, "I punched him in the head and took his phone. " She described herself as, "just as guilty as John," referring to the now convicted murderer, John Wagner, Ms. Merritt's boyfriend.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 2, 2005
As the number of U.S. troops killed in Iraq has risen above 1,300, mothers of the dead have built a grim community of their own, separated by geography but bound together by death. Some have met in pews at funerals." My closest friends now are three other mothers I have met who lost their sons," said Cindy Sheehan of Vacaville, Calif., whose son, Spc. Casey Sheehan, died in an ambush April 4. "Us moms are really the only ones who know what we're going through." In this network linked by sorrow and empathy, however, one issue divides them: the wisdom of the war. Relatives who believe the war in Iraq was necessary tend to gravitate to one another, talking little of politics and more of pride, sacrifice and loneliness.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 21, 2014
What next? That's what should concern us now. When the nightly dance of angry protesters, opportunistic criminals and inept police clashing over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown finally ends, what steps should civic-minded people take to address the ongoing abuse of African Americans by the criminal injustice system? Not just in Ferguson, Mo., but in America? There will be no shortage of good ideas: dashboard cameras, community policing, the hiring of more black cops, the removal of military hardware from police arsenals, sensitivity training.
NEWS
April 26, 2011
The race, gender, or age of the attackers are largely irrelevant to the vicious and senseless beating of Chrissy Lee Polis ("18-year-old charged in McDonald's beating," April 25). This was an act of cowardice, hatred and bullying — pure and simple — and is not peculiar to any particular group. It is the personal responsibility of the attackers and the bystanders who apparently encouraged them. Ignorance, the arrogant self-righteousness to which it often leads, and a lack of empathy are at the root of such incidents.
NEWS
February 16, 2011
Reading the editorial, "Vote for history" (Feb. 16) made me wonder. Do our legislators vote with their brains or their hearts? Personally, I have a great deal of love and understanding for those who choose alternative lifestyles. I also have a great deal of love and understanding for drug addicts, unwed mothers, the criminally insane, etc. I would hope that our legislators who may share in my personal "feelings" would use their intelligence in casting their votes now and in the future.
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