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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
A new restaurant, Joe Benny's Focacceria, opened last week in the Little Italy storefront that was formerly home to Max's Empanadas. The specialty at Joe Benny's will be the “true” Sicilian-style pizzas, which are made with focaccia, topped with ingredients like eggplant, mushrooms, prosciutto and sausage. "I wanted to bring something from my region of Sicily to Little Italy," said the owner of Joe Benny's, Joseph Gardella. “This spot has everything I need. " Gardella said the intimate space was well suited for his vision of a focacceria, a style of eatery very popular in and around Messina, where his family is from.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
A new restaurant, Joe Benny's Focacceria, opened last week in the Little Italy storefront that was formerly home to Max's Empanadas. The specialty at Joe Benny's will be the “true” Sicilian-style pizzas, which are made with focaccia, topped with ingredients like eggplant, mushrooms, prosciutto and sausage. "I wanted to bring something from my region of Sicily to Little Italy," said the owner of Joe Benny's, Joseph Gardella. “This spot has everything I need. " Gardella said the intimate space was well suited for his vision of a focacceria, a style of eatery very popular in and around Messina, where his family is from.
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NEWS
By Rob Kasper | February 7, 1999
I ATE A CHOCOLATE frog, some chocolate fettucine, a chocolate empanada, chocolate pate and a chocolate lightning bolt. I had to do this in the line of duty as a judge at the eighth annual Chocolate Affair, a benefit by area restaurants and caterers for the Center for Poverty Solutions that was held last week at the Baltimore Museum of Industry.I do not claim that being a chocolate judge is one of life's bad jobs. It is a long way, for instance, from digging coal. But I can report that after eating four chocolate desserts in 10 minutes, your tongue begins to feel like a Tootsie Roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
After two years, the original owners of Zella's Pizzeria on Hollins Street are coming back. Julie Ernst and Cem Ari opened Zella's in 2007. It found a loyal following and helped to anchor the struggling Hollins Market neighborhood. They sold the business in 2010, but it floundered without them and eventually closed. In 2011, Ernst and Ari opened Toss , a pizzeria near the Senator Theatre in Rosebank, where they reunited with some of their old patrons, who encouraged them to return to Hollins Market.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 12, 1999
When Peter Zimmer opened the Joy America Cafe in the American Visionary Arts Museum three years ago, Baltimore was amazed at the originality of the food. But originality can have its downside. As a friend of mine said recently, "I never had a meal there that I didn't scrape something off."Still, you can't serve crab imperial and prime rib in the cafe of Baltimore's most offbeat museum. So when restaurateurs Spike and Charlie Gjerde took over Joy America this spring, they decided against any dramatic changes in style.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Max's Empanadas (313 S. High St., 410-547-7900, maxempanadas.com) will close on March 22. Owner Max Gonzalez opened his Argentine cafe and coffee shop in early 2010 in a Little Italy storefront. The specialty was, you guessed it, empanadas, which Gonzalez had built up a following for at area farmers' markets. In a message posted on Facebook on Feb. 28, Gonzalez said that they'll continue to make empanadas for farmers' markets, grocery stores and cafes at a production facility.
NEWS
By John Linder, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2010
Approaching Max's Empanadas at 313 High Street in Little Italy might feel like walking up to someone's home, until you get past the threshold. On the street, only the signs distinguish it from the other homes on the block. Inside, things change, assuming not every foyer in Little Italy sports a long deli display case offering stuffed pastries, desserts, and lunch specials printed on 8 1/2 x 11 paper and taped here and there. The opposite wall supports a micro grocery and wine rack.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
After two years, the original owners of Zella's Pizzeria on Hollins Street are coming back. Julie Ernst and Cem Ari opened Zella's in 2007. It found a loyal following and helped to anchor the struggling Hollins Market neighborhood. They sold the business in 2010, but it floundered without them and eventually closed. In 2011, Ernst and Ari opened Toss , a pizzeria near the Senator Theatre in Rosebank, where they reunited with some of their old patrons, who encouraged them to return to Hollins Market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2010
There has been an Indian restaurant on Little Italy's main street for years, so why not a gourmet Argentine carryout and coffeehouse? Max's Empanadas moved into a storefront location where a couple of Italian delis have come and gone, and it looks to be off to a good start. It's a real charmer. You may recognize the enterprising owner, Max Gonzalez, not only from local farmers' markets, where he sells his pastries, empanadas and chimichurri sauce, but also from the area's tango scene, for which he's both a promoter and teacher.
NEWS
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN REPORTER | June 21, 2006
On Sundays, Island II, a new Dominican bar and grill, provides a menu of timeless Latino moments. Pulsing merengue blends with the soothing sound of conversations in Spanish. The air is laced with aromas of garlic shrimp and thick sancocho soup. At a back table, teenagers play game after game of dominoes. The kitchen of this Fells Point restaurant belongs to Charo Rodriguez and her mother, Andrea Castro, who perform the traditional choreography of seasoned cooks. They gracefully pass one another, weaving back and forth, turning the flame up and down, sauteing, slicing, mashing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Max's Empanadas (313 S. High St., 410-547-7900, maxempanadas.com) will close on March 22. Owner Max Gonzalez opened his Argentine cafe and coffee shop in early 2010 in a Little Italy storefront. The specialty was, you guessed it, empanadas, which Gonzalez had built up a following for at area farmers' markets. In a message posted on Facebook on Feb. 28, Gonzalez said that they'll continue to make empanadas for farmers' markets, grocery stores and cafes at a production facility.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2010
Approaching Max's Empanadas at 313 High St. in Little Italy might feel like walking up to someone's home, until you get past the threshold. On the street, only the signs distinguish it from the other homes on the block. Inside, things change, assuming not every foyer in Little Italy sports a long deli display case offering stuffed pastries, desserts and lunch specials printed on 81/2 -by 11 paper and taped here and there. The opposite wall supports a micro grocery and wine rack.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2010
There has been an Indian restaurant on Little Italy's main street for years, so why not a gourmet Argentine carryout and coffeehouse? Max's Empanadas moved into a storefront location where a couple of Italian delis have come and gone, and it looks to be off to a good start. It's a real charmer. You may recognize the enterprising owner, Max Gonzalez, not only from local farmers' markets, where he sells his pastries, empanadas and chimichurri sauce, but also from the area's tango scene, for which he's both a promoter and teacher.
NEWS
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN REPORTER | June 21, 2006
On Sundays, Island II, a new Dominican bar and grill, provides a menu of timeless Latino moments. Pulsing merengue blends with the soothing sound of conversations in Spanish. The air is laced with aromas of garlic shrimp and thick sancocho soup. At a back table, teenagers play game after game of dominoes. The kitchen of this Fells Point restaurant belongs to Charo Rodriguez and her mother, Andrea Castro, who perform the traditional choreography of seasoned cooks. They gracefully pass one another, weaving back and forth, turning the flame up and down, sauteing, slicing, mashing.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 12, 1999
When Peter Zimmer opened the Joy America Cafe in the American Visionary Arts Museum three years ago, Baltimore was amazed at the originality of the food. But originality can have its downside. As a friend of mine said recently, "I never had a meal there that I didn't scrape something off."Still, you can't serve crab imperial and prime rib in the cafe of Baltimore's most offbeat museum. So when restaurateurs Spike and Charlie Gjerde took over Joy America this spring, they decided against any dramatic changes in style.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | February 7, 1999
I ATE A CHOCOLATE frog, some chocolate fettucine, a chocolate empanada, chocolate pate and a chocolate lightning bolt. I had to do this in the line of duty as a judge at the eighth annual Chocolate Affair, a benefit by area restaurants and caterers for the Center for Poverty Solutions that was held last week at the Baltimore Museum of Industry.I do not claim that being a chocolate judge is one of life's bad jobs. It is a long way, for instance, from digging coal. But I can report that after eating four chocolate desserts in 10 minutes, your tongue begins to feel like a Tootsie Roll.
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