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Emotionally Disturbed

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NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | December 16, 1991
A school for emotionally disturbed youths at a state mental hospital in Sykesville is to close in March because of state budget cuts announced in October.All 22 state and contractual employees of the Muncie School, a special education program at Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville, will lose their jobs, said Jane Cosby, a teacher there.Layoff notices, which came last Monday, won't take effect for 90 days. Muncie students are to be taught at home after March by state home and hospital teachers.
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NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | May 4, 2007
Hillsmere Elementary School parents are fighting part of a plan to revamp how Anne Arundel County educates emotionally disturbed students, saying that shifting more than a dozen into their school would deprive them of the treatment they need and risk their own children's safety. School officials will meet with the parents Tuesday to discuss the proposed transfer of up to 14 elementary students next fall from the Phoenix Center in Annapolis, which serves 85 to 90 children in grades K-12 with emotional problems.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2006
Brenda B. Bridge, retired principal of the Children's Guild who was honored for her work with emotionally disturbed students, died Monday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice. She lived in Pikesville and was 67. Born Brenda Blumenfeld in Baltimore, she was the daughter of a Romanian father and Russian-born mother. As a child she learned Yiddish and English, and attended the city's honors school, Robert E. Lee No. 49, before graduating in 1957 from Forest Park High School. She earned a bachelor's degree at what is now Towson University and a master's from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2006
Brenda B. Bridge, retired principal of the Children's Guild who was honored for her work with emotionally disturbed students, died Monday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice. She lived in Pikesville and was 67. Born Brenda Blumenfeld in Baltimore, she was the daughter of a Romanian father and Russian-born mother. As a child she learned Yiddish and English, and attended the city's honors school, Robert E. Lee No. 49, before graduating in 1957 from Forest Park High School. She earned a bachelor's degree at what is now Towson University and a master's from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1999
THE WOODBOURNE Center, one of the nation's oldest organizations for troubled adolescents, has completed construction of residential treatment facilities for 36 youths on its main campus at 1301 Woodbourne Ave., the former summer home of philanthropist Enoch Pratt.The $3 million addition consists of three one-story buildings, each designed to house up to 12 emotionally disturbed youths receiving care at Woodbourne. The buildings frame a courtyard south of the oldest Woodbourne building, an 1850s-era stone mansion that has been transformed to offices, meeting rooms, a kitchen and dining areas for the nonprofit organization.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 1999
The first comprehensive study of the rapidly growing number of emotionally disturbed people in the nation's jails and prisons has found that 283,800 inmates have severe mental illness, about 16 percent of the total jail population. The report confirms the belief of many state, local and federal experts that jails and prisons have become the nation's new mental hospitals.The study, released by the Justice Department yesterday, paints a grim statistical portrait, detailing how emotionally disturbed inmates tend to go through a revolving door from homelessness to incarceration and then back to the streets with little treatment.
NEWS
February 27, 1995
Recent events make it difficult to determine in which direction Howard County school officials are headed regarding special education.Restrictions on the number of students enrolled in a program for emotionally disturbed students at Waterloo Elementary School, along with a proposal to house some of those students at Stevens Forest Elementary next year, raise questions about which of the trends in special ed the school system is following.There are certainly elements of inclusion -- whereby special education students are integrated into mainstream classrooms -- that can be seen in the system's most recent moves.
NEWS
August 6, 2003
Wiley Wilson White III, former director of an independent living program for emotionally disturbed youths, died of cancer July 29 at his Guilford home. He was 56. Born in Birmingham, Ala., and raised in the Philippines and Florida, he enlisted in the Navy in 1967 and studied the Indonesian language at the Defense Language Institute at Monterey, Calif. After his discharge from the military, he earned a history degree at the University of Florida in Gainesville, where he took graduate courses in special education.
NEWS
March 27, 1995
The parents of emotionally troubled students in Howard County must feel they've gotten a raw deal. The county Board of Education last week rejected a proposal to split a program for seriously emotionally disturbed pupils between Waterloo and Stevens Forest elementary schools. Officials were pushing the proposal as a way to lessen the strain of having all the students attend Waterloo, where the program has been housed for 20 years.But parents at Stevens Forest objected vehemently, the board folded and, in the process, the families of emotionally disturbed children have been shortchanged.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1999
Two statewide coalitions of mental health advocates have asked Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend to block a residential treatment center for seriously emotionally disturbed youths at Charles H. Hickey Jr. School in Baltimore County.In a two-page letter to Townsend, Maryland's Juvenile Justice Coalition said the proposed 24-bed facility at Hickey in Cub Hill is unnecessary because Maryland has enough residential treatment centers.Building another center, the coalition said, will siphon money from other less-intensive treatment options that are needed -- a position shared by the Coalition for a Full Continuum of Care.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2004
In their weekly hour together, Melvin Presco and Mike Keller play basketball and video games and talk about their plans for the weekend. Melvin, 11 and in fifth grade, looks forward to this time. He likes to tell "Mr. Mike" about how well he's doing in school. Keller, 22, is one of eight student-athletes at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who serve as mentors for Hillcrest Elementary pupils diagnosed as emotionally disturbed. Officials at the Catonsville school credit the mentorship program with drastic improvements in children's behavior.
NEWS
August 6, 2003
Wiley Wilson White III, former director of an independent living program for emotionally disturbed youths, died of cancer July 29 at his Guilford home. He was 56. Born in Birmingham, Ala., and raised in the Philippines and Florida, he enlisted in the Navy in 1967 and studied the Indonesian language at the Defense Language Institute at Monterey, Calif. After his discharge from the military, he earned a history degree at the University of Florida in Gainesville, where he took graduate courses in special education.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 1999
The first comprehensive study of the rapidly growing number of emotionally disturbed people in the nation's jails and prisons has found that 283,800 inmates have severe mental illness, about 16 percent of the total jail population. The report confirms the belief of many state, local and federal experts that jails and prisons have become the nation's new mental hospitals.The study, released by the Justice Department yesterday, paints a grim statistical portrait, detailing how emotionally disturbed inmates tend to go through a revolving door from homelessness to incarceration and then back to the streets with little treatment.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1999
THE WOODBOURNE Center, one of the nation's oldest organizations for troubled adolescents, has completed construction of residential treatment facilities for 36 youths on its main campus at 1301 Woodbourne Ave., the former summer home of philanthropist Enoch Pratt.The $3 million addition consists of three one-story buildings, each designed to house up to 12 emotionally disturbed youths receiving care at Woodbourne. The buildings frame a courtyard south of the oldest Woodbourne building, an 1850s-era stone mansion that has been transformed to offices, meeting rooms, a kitchen and dining areas for the nonprofit organization.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1999
Even his most bitter opponents admit it: Bruce Bertell is a true believer.Bertell's passion to help the kids that no one else wants has been the driving force behind a therapeutic network, called Family Advocacy Services Inc., that on any given day is treating 270 kids from the Washington suburbs to northern Baltimore County.It has also put him in the middle of a firestorm of opposition in the well-to-do Worthington Valley, where Bertell wants to put eight emotionally disturbed juvenile offenders in a sprawling half-million-dollar home.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1999
Two statewide coalitions of mental health advocates have asked Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend to block a residential treatment center for seriously emotionally disturbed youths at Charles H. Hickey Jr. School in Baltimore County.In a two-page letter to Townsend, Maryland's Juvenile Justice Coalition said the proposed 24-bed facility at Hickey in Cub Hill is unnecessary because Maryland has enough residential treatment centers.Building another center, the coalition said, will siphon money from other less-intensive treatment options that are needed -- a position shared by the Coalition for a Full Continuum of Care.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | May 4, 2007
Hillsmere Elementary School parents are fighting part of a plan to revamp how Anne Arundel County educates emotionally disturbed students, saying that shifting more than a dozen into their school would deprive them of the treatment they need and risk their own children's safety. School officials will meet with the parents Tuesday to discuss the proposed transfer of up to 14 elementary students next fall from the Phoenix Center in Annapolis, which serves 85 to 90 children in grades K-12 with emotional problems.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2004
In their weekly hour together, Melvin Presco and Mike Keller play basketball and video games and talk about their plans for the weekend. Melvin, 11 and in fifth grade, looks forward to this time. He likes to tell "Mr. Mike" about how well he's doing in school. Keller, 22, is one of eight student-athletes at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who serve as mentors for Hillcrest Elementary pupils diagnosed as emotionally disturbed. Officials at the Catonsville school credit the mentorship program with drastic improvements in children's behavior.
NEWS
May 14, 1995
Self-Righteous Ignorance on SEDThis letter is in response to the April 18 Sun article, "Shock Lingers From Debate," concerning the proposed transfer of the Seriously Emotionally Disturbed (SED) program from Waterloo to Stevens Forest elementary schools.Self-righteousness is never pretty, especially when demonstrated by "experts" who are unfamiliar with the facts of a situation, and the history behind the facts. . . .As is usually the case, the individuals who are the most vociferous about this transfer have the least information about the situation.
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