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By David Zurawik | November 19, 1997
Remember Lucy and William Holden? How about Lucy and John Wayne?Tonight, it's Ellen and Emma Thompson in ABC's "Ellen" (9: 30 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2), and it is every bit the classic half-hour of sitcom madness as any episode of "I Love Lucy." In fact -- risking the wrath of legions of Lucy fans (Lucites?) -- I think tonight's "Ellen" is better than those rightfully cherished episodes from the 1950s.The reason it's better: Thompson. While big-name guest stars from the world of film mainly stood there looking 10 times larger than life on the sitcom screen while Lucy ricocheted off them like a butterfly on LSD, Thompson hits the stage running in the opening sequence and never stops until the final frame.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
No one since Alec Guinness has done a better job of acting the lonely guy in a crowd than Will Ferrell in the marvelous, marvelously imperfect new comedy, Stranger than Fiction. It's been called Ferrell's variation on Jim Carrey's The Truman Show, a chance for a wild farceur to rein himself in. Stranger than Fiction (Columbia Pictures) Starring Will Ferrell, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Dustin Hoffman, Queen Latifah, Emma Thompson. Directed by Marc Forster. Rated PG-13. Time 113 minutes.
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By Lou Cedrone | September 5, 1991
Emma Thompson has done two films with her husband, Kenneth Branagh, ''Henry V'' and ''Dead Again.'' She's also worked with him on the stage but doesn't think such collaborations -- away from home -- have any effect on their home life.''We met while we were working, so we take our professional relationship for granted,'' she said.''It's not a big deal. It isn't a question of taking your work home. It just doesn't happen that way with us," she said. "I don't think we're that kind of people.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 27, 2006
The kids are nasty beyond all reason, and Emma Thompson's makeup is about as repulsive as humanly possible, but Nanny McPhee offers simply a great time to be had at the movies. Abandoning any sense of vanity, Thompson sports a bulbous nose, hairy warts and a buck tooth to end all buck teeth as the film's title character, a mysterious, officious nanny who shows up unannounced to care for the seven unruly children of widower Mr. Brown (Colin Firth), a harried mortician just one step away from debtor's prison.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 13, 1995
"Sense and Sensibility" is a comedy of manners, but nobody ever said they had to be good manners.In fact, in its sedate and witty way, it chronicles bad behavior of the most malicious sort, seeing in society an arena where the contests are as brutal as any in nature, and possibly more so because they are waged with crooked pinky or uplifted eyebrow against a backdrop of crinkling silks and sputtering candles.Derived from Jane Austen's 1811 novel by one of its own stars (Emma Thompson, who may get an Oscar nomination for both acting and writing)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 24, 2001
During Oscar weekend, we're supposed to worship work done on the big screen. But I dare you to find a better performance among any of the best-acting nominations for an Academy Award than the one delivered on the small screen tonight by Emma Thompson in HBO's "Wit." Judy Davis blew me away a few weeks ago as Judy Garland in an ABC movie on the singer's life. But, as great as it was, Davis' performance was only a warm-up for the one Thompson delivers in the television version of Margaret Edson's Pulitzer-Prize-winning play about an accomplished and prickly 48-year-old professor's battle with advanced ovarian cancer.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 27, 2006
The kids are nasty beyond all reason, and Emma Thompson's makeup is about as repulsive as humanly possible, but Nanny McPhee offers simply a great time to be had at the movies. Abandoning any sense of vanity, Thompson sports a bulbous nose, hairy warts and a buck tooth to end all buck teeth as the film's title character, a mysterious, officious nanny who shows up unannounced to care for the seven unruly children of widower Mr. Brown (Colin Firth), a harried mortician just one step away from debtor's prison.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
No one since Alec Guinness has done a better job of acting the lonely guy in a crowd than Will Ferrell in the marvelous, marvelously imperfect new comedy, Stranger than Fiction. It's been called Ferrell's variation on Jim Carrey's The Truman Show, a chance for a wild farceur to rein himself in. Stranger than Fiction (Columbia Pictures) Starring Will Ferrell, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Dustin Hoffman, Queen Latifah, Emma Thompson. Directed by Marc Forster. Rated PG-13. Time 113 minutes.
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
Winter's austere beauty is beautifully evoked in "The Winter Guest." So, too, is the season's subtext: death. That shadowy visitor lingers as life, and even the restless ocean, freeze in a tableau of hushed conversations and yearning, waiting for the thaw.This small, lovely film, set in a Scottish village, is the first directed by actor Alan Rickman. The story, which takes place in one day, focuses on pairs of people: two boys cutting school and discussing their futures by a fire on the beach; two teen-agers who communicate more earnestly by touching than by talking; an aging woman and her daughter, who is mourning the death of the man she loves; and two elderly women who are obsessed with funerals.
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By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | January 16, 2006
Presenters at tonight's Golden Globes - from Leonardo DiCaprio to Harrison Ford to Jamie Foxx to Emma Thompson - will receive swag bags filled with complimentary luxury items valued at more than $62,000. And, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association is handing all the event's guests gift bags valued at more than $1,300. Here's a rundown of selected Freebies for presenters: A two-week vacation to Tasmania, Antarctica and New Zealand aboard a 54-cabin ship to see the wildlife of the region.
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By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | January 16, 2006
Presenters at tonight's Golden Globes - from Leonardo DiCaprio to Harrison Ford to Jamie Foxx to Emma Thompson - will receive swag bags filled with complimentary luxury items valued at more than $62,000. And, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association is handing all the event's guests gift bags valued at more than $1,300. Here's a rundown of selected Freebies for presenters: A two-week vacation to Tasmania, Antarctica and New Zealand aboard a 54-cabin ship to see the wildlife of the region.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 24, 2001
During Oscar weekend, we're supposed to worship work done on the big screen. But I dare you to find a better performance among any of the best-acting nominations for an Academy Award than the one delivered on the small screen tonight by Emma Thompson in HBO's "Wit." Judy Davis blew me away a few weeks ago as Judy Garland in an ABC movie on the singer's life. But, as great as it was, Davis' performance was only a warm-up for the one Thompson delivers in the television version of Margaret Edson's Pulitzer-Prize-winning play about an accomplished and prickly 48-year-old professor's battle with advanced ovarian cancer.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
Winter's austere beauty is beautifully evoked in "The Winter Guest." So, too, is the season's subtext: death. That shadowy visitor lingers as life, and even the restless ocean, freeze in a tableau of hushed conversations and yearning, waiting for the thaw.This small, lovely film, set in a Scottish village, is the first directed by actor Alan Rickman. The story, which takes place in one day, focuses on pairs of people: two boys cutting school and discussing their futures by a fire on the beach; two teen-agers who communicate more earnestly by touching than by talking; an aging woman and her daughter, who is mourning the death of the man she loves; and two elderly women who are obsessed with funerals.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | November 19, 1997
Remember Lucy and William Holden? How about Lucy and John Wayne?Tonight, it's Ellen and Emma Thompson in ABC's "Ellen" (9: 30 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2), and it is every bit the classic half-hour of sitcom madness as any episode of "I Love Lucy." In fact -- risking the wrath of legions of Lucy fans (Lucites?) -- I think tonight's "Ellen" is better than those rightfully cherished episodes from the 1950s.The reason it's better: Thompson. While big-name guest stars from the world of film mainly stood there looking 10 times larger than life on the sitcom screen while Lucy ricocheted off them like a butterfly on LSD, Thompson hits the stage running in the opening sequence and never stops until the final frame.
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By Ruthe Stein and Ruthe Stein,SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | November 9, 1997
Helena Bonham Carter knows she has an image problem. Since her first starring role as Jane Grey in the 1985 "Lady Jane," she has been pigeonholed as the queen of costume dramas.Between Merchant-Ivory films ("A Room With a View," "Howards End") and Shakespeare ("Twelfth Night," "Hamlet"), she has worn gowns from almost every period except the present.Because of these films, "There's this image of me as corseted and prim and irredeemably English -- all those things I don't think I am," she complains.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 13, 1995
"Sense and Sensibility" is a comedy of manners, but nobody ever said they had to be good manners.In fact, in its sedate and witty way, it chronicles bad behavior of the most malicious sort, seeing in society an arena where the contests are as brutal as any in nature, and possibly more so because they are waged with crooked pinky or uplifted eyebrow against a backdrop of crinkling silks and sputtering candles.Derived from Jane Austen's 1811 novel by one of its own stars (Emma Thompson, who may get an Oscar nomination for both acting and writing)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 28, 1993
"Much Ado About Nothing"Starring Kenneth Branagh, Emma Thompson and Denzel WashingtonDirected by Kenneth BranaghbTC Released by Samuel GoldwynRated PG.*** 1/25/8 Sun, sex and jokes? What could appeal more pruriently to the baser instincts of moviegoers than that recipe? And that's exactly what Kenneth Branagh serves up in great plummy gobs in his rollicking version of Shakespeare's proto-Hepburn/Tracy farce, "Much Ado About Nothing."The plot could have been hatched by a couple of hacks sitting in a Beverly Hills delicatessen over lox and bagels one morning 10 minutes before a pitch meeting with network brass.
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By Lou Cedrone | January 24, 1991
''The Tall Guy'' is reminiscent of those comedies the English used to make, films starring Alec Guinness and Peter Sellers. The new film may be a little wackier, a bit more insane than those, but it does remind us of a time when the English were leaders in the movie comedy market.''The Tall Guy'' will in no way diminish the British reputation for good movie fun. The film, which may also remind some of ''A Fish Called Wanda'' (and before that, the ''Carry On, Doctor'' comedies), stars Jeff Goldblum as an American who has been trying to make it as an actor in London.
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March 13, 1994
Here are the nominations for the 66th annual Academy Awards, which will be presented March 21 in Los Angeles by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.To vote on the Oscars, call Sundial, The Sun's telephone information service, at (410) 783-1800. In Anne Arundel County, call (410) 268-7736; in Harford County, (410) 836-5028; in Carroll County, (410) 848-0338. Using a touch-tone phone, punch in the four-digit code 6100 after you hear the greeting. Voting will conclude at noon Tuesday.
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By Robert W. Butler and Robert W. Butler,Kansas City Star | July 17, 1993
He's slight and wan and has a shapeless, doughy face like a pre-adolescent boy.She has a horsy mouth, a perpetually wrinkled brow, and it's hard to decide what's sharper -- her nose or her jaw line.But put Kenneth Branagh and Emma Thompson in a movie, give TTC them characters and a story to tell, and watch the sparks fly.Catch their current act in the Branagh-directed "Much Ado About Nothing," in which the married couple play Shakespeare's sharp-witted battling lovers, Beatrice and Benedick, and you'll see the most intoxicating kind of movie magic.
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