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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2001
Environmental Elements Corp., the Baltimore-based maker of air pollution-control devices, said it has won its second contract as a result of new federal regulations tightening hazardous-emissions standards in the paper industry. The company said it won a $15 million contract from a North American pulp and paper company to do environmental cleanup work at four paper mills in the Southeast. Environment Elements officials didn't identify the client. It is the second contract the company has secured as a result of companies' needing to meet tougher standards for reducing hazardous air pollutant emissions.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | November 9, 2007
Maryland joined California and a dozen other states yesterday in suing the Bush administration for failing to approve their programs to reduce global warming pollution from vehicles. Maryland's General Assembly this spring approved a law called the Clean Cars Act that requires the state to follow California's lead in requiring all new cars to cut their carbon dioxide emissions by a third by 2016. New York, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Connecticut and other states also want to follow California, which has unique authority under federal law to set vehicle emissions standards different than national limits, as long as it obtains a waiver from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | December 28, 1997
NEGOTIATORS from around the world have agreed tentatively on a package of measures that, for the first time, would legally obligate industrialized countries to cut emissions of so-called greenhouses gases that scientists say are warming Earth's atmosphere.Under terms of the tentative accord reached in Kyoto, Japan, the United States will have to cut its emissions by 7 percent from 1990 levels.The European Union's target was set at a reduction in emissions of 8 percent and Japan's at 6 percent.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | January 5, 1994
CLARIFICATIONA story in Wednesday's Carroll and Howard editions should have made clear that the current auto-emissions testing station on Bethel Road near Route 140 in Carroll County will remain in operation until the end of this year.A new auto-emissions test station will be built at the Air Business Center as planned because it would be too expensive to build it at another site, Carroll and Westminster officials decided yesterday.It would cost taxpayers about $300,000 to build the station at another location, city Public Works Director Thomas B. Beyard said.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1996
The operators of the Hawkins Point Medical Waste Incinerator -- which has come under fierce criticism from local environmentalists and neighborhood leaders -- have reduced emissions of pollutants by about half over the past two years, according to public records and interviews.Since new operators, under the name Phoenix Services Inc., took charge of the facility two years ago, there have been no violations or warnings issued against the incinerator, according to state environmental officials.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2013
Solar power is going everywhere these days — homes, businesses, schools, even sewage plants. Howard County is beginning work this week installing about 740 photovoltaic panels at its Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant in Savage. The $1.5 million project will generate a fraction of the power needed by Maryland's fifth largest wastewater treatment plant. Its chief purpose, however, according to County Executive Ken Ulman, is to offset carbon emissions from big new diesel generators being installed to prevent sewage spills like the massive one triggered by Superstorm Sandy last year.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2004
A $100,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency will help buy ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel for 165 transit buses in East Baltimore, officials said yesterday. Wedged between several disassembled MTA buses in a Highlandtown bus barn, representatives from several state, national and local agencies said the one-year project is intended to reduce diesel exhaust emissions, which exacerbate the city's smog and can cause respiratory and health problems. The EPA money given to the Maryland Department of the Environment will subsidize the difference in cost between regular diesel and the ultra-low-sulfur fuel, which is 8 cents to 12 cents more a gallon, said Robert L. Smith, administrator for the Maryland Transit Administration.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | June 15, 2008
As energy prices soar and global warming awareness grows, more Americans are buying hybrid cars, outfitting their homes with low-energy light bulbs and worrying about the distance their food travels from farm to plate. But when it comes to air travel, how many pay attention to the jet fuel their flights consume and the carbon emissions those planes generate? Though aviation represents only 3 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, that share is likely to rise as air traffic grows - the Federal Aviation Administration says commercial flights in the U.S. alone will increase 60 percent by 2030.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2000
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - In a shift that is likely to brighten prospects for a global warming treaty, American negotiators at talks here have said the United States would be willing to limit its use of forest projects to reach its target for reducing heat-trapping greenhouse gases. The new stance, signaled in the face of mounting criticism from Europe and private environmental groups, came this weekend, halfway through a contentious two-week session aimed at writing the fine print for the treaty, called the Kyoto Protocol.
NEWS
September 30, 1997
STARTING TOMORROW, most vehicle owners in the state must put their automobiles through a controversial treadmill test (the dynamometer) as part of the required two-year emissions inspection program. Previously, the treadmill test had been voluntary. Yet judging from the half-million motorists who have already experienced the dynamometer, it's no big deal.The chief beneficiaries of this change will be all who breathe in the state. The very young, the elderly and the 600,000 Marylanders with respiratory problems are most vulnerable to auto-caused smog.
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