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NEWS
September 16, 2013
I was sorry to learn that special interest groups are looking out for themselves with total disregard for the nation's best interests as they seek to undo former President George W. Bush's major piece of climate change legislation, the Renewable Fuel Standards Act ( "How Big Poultry sided with Big Oil," Sept. 11). However, the Renewable Fuel Standards Act will only reduce vehicular emissions, and only by a relatively small amount. What we really need is legislation that will motivate all industries across the economy and around the world to reduce emissions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 7, 2014
It is time to plug the loopholes for coal-fired power plants in Maryland ( "New coal plant pollution controls eyed," Sept. 13). A report by the Maryland Department of the Environment found that many of the coal fired power plants in Maryland had not used their pollution controls continuously. If the Brandon Shores and Wagner plants had used their controls continuously in 2012, they could have cut nitrous oxide emissions by 2,000 tons. So what's the problem with nitrous oxide?
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NEWS
February 9, 2013
Mike Tidwell is correct that the evidence for global climate change is indisputable and that carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels and alterations in the earth's ecosystems is the primary cause ("Forecast calls for pain," Feb. 6). Since the carbon already in the atmosphere will persist for a thousand years, we must stop and not merely reduce greenhouse gas emissions if we are to stabilize the current status. I agree that society must put a price on carbon dioxide emissions for the universal harm they do. In so doing, as the price increases, clean, non-carbon energy sources will become competitive in the marketplace.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
The Sun's recent editorial "Too much carbon, too little time" (Sept. 11) is in line with the global warming arguments which are based on forecasts rather than accumulated technical and political realities. The article states that CO2 levels are 142 percent higher today than before the Industrial Revolution which began about 1800. At that time there were 1 billion people in the world; today there are 7 billion; by 2050 there will be 9 billion and by 2100 there will be 12 billion. This is a 1,200 percent increase in population since 1800.
NEWS
June 16, 2014
Although recent national news has focused on the latest political events and gun attacks, the Obama administration's new rules forcing reductions in carbon dioxide emissions from power plants is far more important ( "Carbon rules can work," June 2). Carbon dioxide traps sun-heated air at the earth's surface, raising temperatures and sea levels. As 2003's Hurricane Isabel and later Superstorm Sandy showed us, places like historic Annapolis, Fells Point and the entire Eastern Shore of Maryland - not to mention the Jersey Shore and New York City - could be inundated in years to come.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
The new owner of the Sparrows Point steel mill has agreed to pay a $135,000 penalty and resolve alleged violations of state pollution control laws that occurred in 2009 when part of a blast furnace ignited, state officials announced Thursday. RG Steel Sparrows LLC, which purchased Sparrows Point in April, has signed an agreement with the Maryland Department of the Environment, or MDE, and the Maryland Office of the Attorney General to reduce emissions from the blast furnace. The money will go to the Maryland Clean Air Fund.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 21, 2003
PROVIDENCE, R.I. - A coalition of state attorneys general announced plans yesterday to sue the Bush administration for not regulating carbon-dioxide emissions from power plants. The coalition from New York, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Washington and Rhode Island says the administration's regulatory failure flagrantly violates the Clean Air Act and shows a dangerous indifference to global warming. "This problem will not disappear through wishful thinking or artful spinning," Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal said yesterday in a telephone conference call with the other states' attorneys general.
NEWS
October 6, 1992
With $100 million or more at stake, there's a strong temptation for state politicians to throw their weight around to ensure that Maryland's auto-emissions testing contract goes to the politically correct company. That's why the Schaefer administration should keep the decision-making process as impartial and non-political as possible.Already, two powerful black legislators have met with the governor and with top transportation officials to get special consideration for a black-owned company eager to win the bid. According to one participant's account, the legislators threatened "trouble for the department" unless the procurement process was intentionally tilted in the direction of their favored company.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 16, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland's tailpipe exhaust inspection program may soon be expanded to include at least six rural counties and to force owners of failing automobiles to make far more costly repairs.Legislation expected to be offered Friday by Gov. William Donald Schaefer will extend indefinitely the 7-year-old program, currently set to expire at year's end.But to comply with the federal Clean Air Act passed by Congress and signed into law last November by President Bush, the state must significantly expand and toughen the program or risk losing millions of dollars in federal highway funds, administration officials said.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | July 1, 1993
A blue-ribbon panel has decided that a Tennessee firm -- the veritable dark horse in a hotly contested race -- is the best choice to receive a lucrative contract to build and operate Maryland's automobile exhaust monitoring stations.The committee's recommendation, which was announced yesterday, provides an ironic twist to the politically charged procurement. The panel's preferred contractor, MARTA Technologies Inc. of Nashville, had not even hired a lobbyist in Annapolis, but now appears likely to win a $97 million contract.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
The flaw in Rep. Chris Van Hollen's Healthy Climate and Family Security Act is in the method he proposes to reduce carbon emissions - a declining cap, as opposed to a gradually rising fee ( "Cap and dividend," Aug. 4). One can expect that those who demonized cap-and-trade as "cap-and-tax" will come up with some catchy way to attack this particular proposal. However, by implementing a gradually rising fee on carbon, with all collected revenues returned to the public as a dividend, opponents of pricing carbon will be left without an argument.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
How would you like to receive a quarterly check from the federal government? Most taxpayers would surely be happy with such an arrangement. But here's the really good part: What if by accepting that check you were also helping your country reduce a form of air pollution that is a threat to human health and responsible for climate change while simultaneously developing a rational, sustainable energy policy? That sounds too good to be true, but remarkably, it may not be. Under The Healthy Climate and Family Security Act introduced last week by Maryland Rep. Chris Van Hollen, companies that drill for oil and gas or mine for coal would have to purchase through auction a permit to do so. Not a dime of the resulting revenue would be kept by the government but would simply be forwarded as checks to every man, woman and child.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
The owner of a planned power plant in Fairfield faces millions of dollars in fines and has been ordered to halt construction because company officials didn't buy enough emissions credits to offset air pollution the facility is expected to emit, according to state officials. Maryland Department of the Environment officials could fine Energy Answers International, the New York-based company that is building the plant, more than $8 million for the violation — $25,000 for each day since it began construction last August.
NEWS
By Ned Tillman | June 12, 2014
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy earlier this month announced plans to lower the carbon emissions from our antiquated coal-fired power plants 30 percent by 2030. Much of the justification for this has been focused on the need to slow down global warming, sea level rise and other threats of climate change. But there are many other benefits to Marylanders from reducing our dependence on coal-fired power plants that we need to fully understand so that we can enthusiastically support these new measures and speed up their adoption.
NEWS
June 8, 2014
Republicans, trying to deflect their own lack of leadership in anything but hatred for President Barack Obama, often accuse him of not leading, particularly in the realm of international affairs where Republicans seem only to count actions as leadership when they involve firing a gun or a missile. However, the facts put the lie to this Republican assertion. Flying in the face of intense pressure to ignore the disastrous effects of climate change on our health, our homes, and even our lives and those of our children and grandchildren, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a much-needed plan to start reducing climate change by cutting carbon emissions for existing power plants.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Letter writer and Republican congressional candidate Dan Bongino apparently has never heard of George Shultz, former President Ronald Reagan's secretary of state. That's the only way to explain Mr. Bongino's assertion that a revenue-neutral carbon tax would "create chaos in the markets" ( "Delaney's energy policy a muddle," April 12). In a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed, Mr. Shultz noted that a revenue-neutral carbon tax "would encourage producers and consumers to shift toward energy sources that emit less carbon - such as toward gas-fired power plants and away from coal-fired plants - and generate greater demand for electric and flex-fuel cars and lesser demand for conventional gasoline-powered cars.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | November 13, 1994
The Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed emissions standards that would reduce the exhaust products of gasoline- and diesel-powered marine engines built in 1998 or thereafter.And while the headlines left some boaters gasping at the prospect of perhaps having to replace existing engines or motors or altering them to meet new emissions standards, take a moment and catch your breath.Presently, there are no provisions to require retrofitting of existing engines and motors.There is, however, a great deal to be said for the EPA's proposal because in the long run the changes to engines and motors will be beneficial to boaters and nonboaters alike.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff WriterMotor Vehicle Administration/JEF DAUBER/SUN STAFF GRAPHIC | November 27, 1994
The 19 nearly identical red brick buildings that have sprung up across Maryland's landscape this past year are just five weeks away from offering one of the nation's strictest vehicle exhaust testing programs.For the average motorist, the new pollution-control tests bode dramatic change. They will be more elaborate, stringent, time-consuming and expensive than any given before. The state expects 300,000 vehicles to fail the biennial test each year, causing their owners to face repair bills as high as $450.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 3, 2014
New federal auto emission and fuel standards announced Monday should help clear Maryland's summer smog and even aid the cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay, according to state environmental officials. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said the "Tier 3" rules it finalized limiting tailpipe emissions and sulfur in gasoline should reduce harmful pollution, prevent thousands of illnesses and premature deaths and improve the mileage of cars and trucks. Robert M. Summers, Maryland's environment secretary, said reducing vehicle emissions should mean healthier air to breathe in the state "for generations to come.
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