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By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | December 10, 2006
Paul Burman ducked past a parking attendant, scooted up a cement stairway and stepped into a downtown lot crammed with oversized vehicles. "Oh," he said, sucking in his breath. "Jackpot." Ordinarily, Burman and other members of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network might shudder at the sight of sport utility vehicles. But yesterday, the environmental activists sought out gas-guzzlers in an attempt to reach out to what some might see as an unlikely partner in the effort to improve state vehicle emission standards - SUV drivers.
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Tim Wheeler | March 3, 2014
New federal auto emission and fuel standards announced Monday should help clear Maryland's summer smog and even aid the cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay, according to state environmental officials. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said the "Tier 3" rules it finalized limiting tailpipe emissions and sulfur in gasoline should reduce harmful pollution, prevent thousands of illnesses and premature deaths and improve the mileage of cars and trucks. Robert M. Summers, Maryland's environment secretary, said reducing vehicle emissions should mean healthier air to breathe in the state "for generations to come.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | March 7, 1991
State environmental officials are looking for help from the nation's smoggiest state, California, in battling Maryland's stubborn air-pollution problems.The Maryland Department of the Environment has endorsed a General Assembly bill introduced by three Montgomery County delegates that would pass up new federal limits on car and truck pollution in favor of more stringent standards imposed by California.George P. Ferreri, state director of air management, told the House Environmental Matters Committee yesterday that Maryland needs to get tougher on motor vehicle pollution than federal law requires in order to eliminate the smog that plagues the Baltimore and Washington areas every summer.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
Regarding Gov. Martin O'Malley's decision to petition the EPA fuel standards on behalf of the Carnival Cruise Line, I urge Carnival to move its operations from Baltimore to Beijing or Somalia ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rules," June 16). Maryland doesn't need to suck up to any corporation trying to pull off an economic development blackmail scheme on it. It's also clear that the United States doesn't need a future president who is so quick to compromise the state and nation's well being in the name of a big polluter and political contributor.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 26, 2009
WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama will clear the way today for Maryland, California and several other states to implement auto emissions rules designed to slash global warming pollution, sources familiar with the decision said yesterday. The move is significant on two fronts: It could empower states to set tougher standards in targeting emissions, which are blamed for contributing to global climate change; and it would be another swift reversal by Obama of Bush administration policy, this time on energy.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau Timothy B. Wheeler contributed to this article | March 7, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- California, here we come. Maybe.A House of Delegates committee gave its overwhelming approval yesterday to a bill that would require all new cars sold in Maryland to meet California's tough tailpipe emission standards beginning no later than the 1998 model year.The House Environmental Matters Committee voted 20-3 for the Schaefer administration bill, which is expected to pass the full House. However, its chances in the Senate are still in question.The House committee amended the so-called "California cars" bill to delay its implementation, but included a provision for an earlier start time if surrounding states were to adopt similar emissions laws.
NEWS
By Ellen J. Silberman and Ellen J. Silberman,States News Service | January 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A decision this week by the Environmental Protection Ageency (EPA) clears the way for Maryland and other Northeastern states to combat the region's smog problems by requiring more stringent controls on auto and truck exhaust than the federal law requires, state air quality officials said yesterday.The EPA, after several months' delay, Thursday granted California a waiver from the 1990 Clean Air Act, allowing the state with the worst pollution problems in the country to impose the nation's toughest emission standards on new cars and trucks, starting with model year 1994.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | January 26, 1993
A New York court ruling has cast a cloud over Maryland's move toward California-style, cleaner cars. A Maryland official, however, insists there is a silver lining.A federal judge in Binghamton, N.Y., has blocked New York's adoption of stringent emission standards for all new cars and trucks sold in that state beginning in 1995.Ruling on a lawsuit filed by the auto industry, U.S. District Judge Thomas J. McAvoy decided Friday that New York's adoption of California's tailpipe limits violates the federal Clean Air Act of 1990, which protects motor vehicle manufacturers from the "undue burden" of state regulations.
NEWS
May 19, 2004
ENVIRONMENTALISTS would generally concede they are not keen on compromise. Is any pollution, despoliation or loss of nature's gifts acceptable? Greens don't like to split the difference between no damage and a lot, or even some. So it was all the more impressive that the Bush administration was able to strike a compromise between environmental groups and industry representatives on tough new emission standards for diesel-burning monster vehicles, such as tractors, bulldozers, locomotives and barges.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff Timothy Wheeler contributed to this story | April 3, 1991
A bill that would require new cars sold in Maryland to be equipped with the tougher anti-pollution devices called for in California appears to be in serious trouble in a state Senate committee.The bill does not have overwhelming support among members of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee and their chairman yesterday predicted that the measure would fail on a close vote.The bill "spoils free enterprise" and "isolates Maryland" by applying tough vehicle emission standards that would not affect cars and trucks sold in neighboring states, said the chairman, Sen. Walter M. Baker, D-Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Jim Tankersley and Richard Simon and Jim Tankersley and Richard Simon,Tribune Washington Bureau | May 19, 2009
WASHINGTON - -The Obama administration will unveil rules Tuesday that will require vast reductions in vehicle greenhouse gas emissions and gas mileage improvements over the next seven years, changes that will mark a potentially pivotal shift in the battle over global warming. After decades of political sparring, legal challenges and scientific arguments over climate change, three of the central players - the federal government, major U.S. car makers, and the state of California - have essentially concluded that the time has come to suspend hostilities and make a deal.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 26, 2009
WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama will clear the way today for Maryland, California and several other states to implement auto emissions rules designed to slash global warming pollution, sources familiar with the decision said yesterday. The move is significant on two fronts: It could empower states to set tougher standards in targeting emissions, which are blamed for contributing to global climate change; and it would be another swift reversal by Obama of Bush administration policy, this time on energy.
NEWS
By Benjamin L. Cardin | March 11, 2008
Scientists clearly understand the relationship between global warming and carbon dioxide emissions coming from the millions of vehicles crowding American streets and highways. Nationally, 30 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions come from tailpipes. In Maryland, the figure is slightly higher. Unfortunately, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency doesn't share the understanding of the vast majority of scientists - even those in his own agency. He has blocked Maryland and other states from voluntarily tightening emissions standards for vehicles.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | January 25, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Facing heat from Congress yesterday, the head of the EPA stood by his decision to block California from limiting greenhouse gas emissions from cars and trucks. Maryland was one of 15 states that had been awaiting Environmental Protection Agency approval to begin enforcing the new standards developed by the California Air Resources Board. But Stephen L. Johnson became the first EPA administrator to deny a so-called California waiver last month when he rejected the request.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,sun reporter | January 26, 2007
With Annapolis leadership united behind a bill to require tougher emissions standards for new cars sold in Maryland, members of the auto industry asked a legislative committee yesterday to delay approval until an independent study of the science involved can be undertaken. "The truth of the matter is, the federal standards are [already] very, very clean," said William Kress, a lobbyist representing the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, an industry group. "I encourage you to go out and get more information on this."
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | December 10, 2006
Paul Burman ducked past a parking attendant, scooted up a cement stairway and stepped into a downtown lot crammed with oversized vehicles. "Oh," he said, sucking in his breath. "Jackpot." Ordinarily, Burman and other members of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network might shudder at the sight of sport utility vehicles. But yesterday, the environmental activists sought out gas-guzzlers in an attempt to reach out to what some might see as an unlikely partner in the effort to improve state vehicle emission standards - SUV drivers.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Annapolis Bureau | February 12, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Fresh from a victory in Virginia, auto and oil industry officials urged a House committee yesterday to kill a Schaefer administration bill that would require all new cars sold in Maryland to meet California's stringent tailpipe emission standards.But state officials, environmentalists and chemical manufacturers argued that Maryland needs the clean-car measure to deal with stubborn air pollution problems in the Baltimore and Washington areas.In a lengthy House Environmental Matters hearing peppered with slide presentations, bar charts and technical jargon, the two sides tangled over the benefits and costs of requiring "California cars" in Maryland.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | October 30, 1991
Armed with a new smog-fighting accord among northeastern states, Maryland officials plan to urge previously reluctant state legislators to adopt California's strict auto emission rules.Environmental officials from Maryland, the District of Columbia and eight other northeastern states agreed yesterday inPhiladelphia to seek state legislation or regulations that would go beyond federal requirements and impose California's "low emission vehicle" standards on all new cars and trucks sold in their states.
NEWS
May 19, 2004
ENVIRONMENTALISTS would generally concede they are not keen on compromise. Is any pollution, despoliation or loss of nature's gifts acceptable? Greens don't like to split the difference between no damage and a lot, or even some. So it was all the more impressive that the Bush administration was able to strike a compromise between environmental groups and industry representatives on tough new emission standards for diesel-burning monster vehicles, such as tractors, bulldozers, locomotives and barges.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | November 1, 1994
An article Tuesday about cleaner-running powerboats should have said that a 100-horsepower outboard motor costs about $8,000.The Sun regrets the errors.WASHINGTON -- Boating, the weekend passion of thousands in the Chesapeake Bay region, is destined to become a cleaner (( but more costly pastime under new federal air pollution rules announced yesterday.Targeting powerboats as one of the last major uncontrolled sources of smog, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed emission standards for new gasoline and diesel boat engines.
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