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Emigration

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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 21, 1991
MOSCOW -- The Soviet parliament voted yesterday to grant nearly all citizens the legal right to emigrate and travel abroad, but it postponed implementation of the new rules until Jan. 1, 1993, because of fears of a flood of emigrants.Fyodor M. Burlatsky, an editor who had fought for the bill for nearly two years, hailed it as a giant step away from the centuries-old Russian suspicion of the outside world."We have always feared strangers," said Mr. Burlatsky, chairman of an official Soviet human rights monitoring committee.
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TRAVEL
By Tony Glaros, For The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
This quirky island, snug in the wine-dark northern Aegean Sea, came alive with tantalizing tales my grandmother spun when I was young. The narratives, some real, others not so much, were a balm. On school nights, they kept me up past my bedtime. Colorful characterizations of pirates and poverty; of mineral springs said to heal arthritis; and tales about Costa, a goat who wreaked havoc in her native village. Ikaria, I learned then, was also the birthplace of a humble dish called soufiko - a cocktail of fresh veggies crafted by cooks expert in the art of farm-to-table dining.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 12, 1999
BEERSHEBA, Israel -- Hundreds of Jews have been emigrating from Cuba to Israel over the past several years in a hushed arrangement between a staunch U.S. ally, the Israeli government, and one of America's longest-standing enemies, President Fidel Castro.Israeli officials anonymously confirmed the arrangement yesterday. Leaders of the Jewish community in Cuba also confirmed the emigration of more than 400 Jews to Israel since the early 1990s, leaving behind approximately 1,000 in Cuba's once-thriving Jewish community.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
Joel Abraham Cordish, a Baltimore-born lacrosse enthusiast who overcame a severe injury and emigrated to Israel, died of congestive heart failure in a Jerusalem hospital July 29. He was 67. He was a 1961 graduate of City College, where he played varsity soccer and was the starting goalie on a team that went on to capture a Maryland state championship. He earned a bachelor of arts degree at the Johns Hopkins University, where he excelled at academics and athletics. He was All-America in soccer and was a lacrosse goalie for three years.
NEWS
July 27, 2008
The first Maryland statewide convention of the black population met from July 27-29, 1852 at Washington Hall in Baltimore. Six delegates from Harford County were among 43 participants who met to address "repressive measures which had been under discussion in the legislature for their expatriation and suppression." The delegates sought to chart their own futures as residents of Maryland. They were divided among those in favor of emigration to Africa, mainly those delegates from southern Maryland, and those from the Baltimore area who were against the colonization of other countries by African-Americans.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 1, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Fearing the effects on Soviet people of food shortages and a severe winter, President Bush said yesterday that he may allow the Soviet Union to buy food on credit from the United States by waiving trade restrictions that prohibit such transactions.The Soviet parliament has not yet enacted the emigration guarantees that Mr. Bush has been holding out for before he lifts the controls.But the president said that he was reconsidering and might change his policy because it was harming U.S. farm communities as well as denying critical food aid to the Soviets.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby | August 20, 1991
Israeli officials yesterday were forced by the fall of Mikhail S. Gorbachev to re-evaluate plans for Middle East peace talks and to begin preparing for a possible tidal wave of Soviet Jews wanting to emigrate.The turmoil threatened to upset months of planning for the peace talks scheduled to convene in October under Soviet and U.S. sponsorship. But Foreign Minister David Levy pledged Israel's willingness to participate with or without Soviet involvement.Mr. Gorbachev was the figure who ended decades of Soviet hostility toward Israel, first by reducing Soviet military support for hard-line Arab regimes.
NEWS
By Edwin Feulner | May 31, 1991
IT'S official: The Russians really are coming.The Soviet legislature has passed an open-door emigration policy allowing citizens to travel or live abroad. Soviet officials estimate that at least 500,000 citizens will emigrate annually, and eventually as many as 5 million could leave for the West. The Russian republic, the Soviet Union's largest, probably will see at least a million refugees leave for Western Europe and the United States."We do not have enough paper to provide passports for all those wanting them," says Vladimir Shcherbakov, Soviet chairman of the State Committee for Labor and Social Affairs.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | June 28, 1992
From The Sun June 28-July 4, 1842JUNE 30: An Emigration -- The New York papers state that colonies of lawyers are leaving that city for the far West. Lucky for New York -- bad for the far West.JULY 2: Those who may wish to go to Philadelphia, Cape May, Wilmington or intermediate points have an excellent opportunity offered them in the arrangements made by the Philadelphia Railroad Company.From The Sun June 28-July 4, 1892JUNE 28: The Italians of Baltimore wish to put up a statue of Columbus, to be unveiled October 12, Columbus Day. They have written to Italy to learn the cost of a suitable statue and it is very probable that one will be purchased.
NEWS
By ALEXEI VINOGRADSKY | June 16, 1991
The Soviet parliament's approval of the long-awaited emigration law calls to mind a joke from 1988 when the bill was first being discussed.The story went like this: In Red Square a parade is passing to commemorate the October Revolution. Many foreign journalists are watching the tanks, missiles, cannons pass. In the parade march the paratroopers, Marines and sailors. At the end is a strange regiment wearing dark business suits and ties."Who are they?" a journalist asks a Soviet general who stands nearby.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2010
Gladys Rodriguez, her husband and two young sons fled Castro's Cuba 40 years ago and made a nail-biting journey to the United States, where they eventually took the oath of U.S. citizenship during a bicentennial event at Baltimore's Fort McHenry in 1976. So you might expect that she and her family would exhibit the powerful patriotic feelings that might lay dormant in other Americans. For Rodriguez, those feelings found voice in, of all things, a cookbook. "My daughter-in-law had a friend who was injured in Iraq," said Rodriguez, who lives in Crofton.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
Dr. Davood Badie, a Harford County pediatrician, died Monday at his Bel Air home from complications of cardiovascular disease and Parkinson's disease. He was 79. Dr. Badie, the son of a farm owner, was born and raised in Mazandaran Province, Iran. He earned his medical degree from the University of Tehran in 1955 and moved to England five years later. In 1961, he immigrated to Baltimore. Dr. Badie completed a rotating internship at Maryland General Hospital in 1962 and a residency in pediatrics at what is now the University of Maryland Medical Center two years later.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | July 13, 2009
The discovery of a discolored and worn-thin penny rarely generates enthusiasm, unless the discoverer is digging into history and the coin provides insight into the life of another era. Brianne Reynolds, an anthropology student at the University of Maryland, College Park, found the 1891 penny while sifting through what remains of an Irish-American enclave in Baltimore County just north of Timonium. "It's greenish so it stuck out in the red clay," Reynolds said. "It's definitely in the right period.
NEWS
July 27, 2008
The first Maryland statewide convention of the black population met from July 27-29, 1852 at Washington Hall in Baltimore. Six delegates from Harford County were among 43 participants who met to address "repressive measures which had been under discussion in the legislature for their expatriation and suppression." The delegates sought to chart their own futures as residents of Maryland. They were divided among those in favor of emigration to Africa, mainly those delegates from southern Maryland, and those from the Baltimore area who were against the colonization of other countries by African-Americans.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,SUN REPORTER | May 2, 2008
Philip Tulkoff spent most of his career in engineering and computers. The food manufacturing business started by his Russian immigrant grandparents nearly 80 years ago had only been his high school summer job. So no one was more surprised than Tulkoff, 47, when he was asked three years ago to take over as chief executive of Baltimore-based Tulkoff Food Products Inc., best known for its horseradish and related products. "It totally came out of the blue," Tulkoff said. "I really had to learn everything."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2007
Solomon Milgrome, a retired Southwest Baltimore grocer who led services at the Shaarei Tfiloh Congregation and lived independently until his death at 104, died at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care on April 13. Family members said he never recovered after recently catching a cold. Born in 1903 in a Polish shtetl known as Sokolow, he received religious instruction as a young man and never relinquished his Old World spiritual heritage. "I decided that it was absolutely healthy for a person to be sensibly religious - not fanatical," Mr. Milgrome said in a 1994 Sun interview.
NEWS
October 24, 1993
Too Many People Spoiling The LandPeter Jay is discouraged by the rising tide of growth in Maryland (Perspective, Oct. 3). Mr. Jay rather depressingly recounts all the common economic and social factors effecting the current destruction of (our shared) Harford County. I would suggest that the disintegration of rural America is hardly inevitable. The solution to the problem of housing sprawl is really quite simple: Stabilize, then reduce, the human population.Can this be accomplished? Of course, with proper incentives.
NEWS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2005
Arundel junior Emre Ucal joined the Wildcats' tennis team this spring with an impressive and seemingly overqualified resume. It started in his homeland of Turkey, where he was once ranked 16th in the country at the youth level. When his family moved to the United States four years ago, Ucal became a U.S. Tennis Association tournament player, winning the Maryland State Indoor boys under-16 championship last May. With a powerful serve, pounding ground strokes and eight years of winning tennis, what could Ucal possibly find new and so enjoyable on the courts of Arundel High?
TOPIC
By FrankD. Roylance and By FrankD. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
When Cornell University physicist and atomic-bomb theorist Hans A. Bethe died last week at age 98, many obituaries portrayed him as a "titan" - the last giant of a "golden age" of physics that flowered between the world wars. Those years of experimenting and theorizing about the fundamental nature of matter and energy built the science that made possible construction of the first atomic bomb. The same years, and the rise of Nazi power in Germany, also provided the fear and rationale for building the bomb, and the brilliant corps of scientists - many of them refugees from Hitler's race laws - who did the work for the United States instead of the Fuehrer.
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