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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1998
The photo that appeared in yesterday's editions with the obituary of Walter Kloetzli, longtime banquet manager of the old Emerson Hotel, was incorrect. Mr. Kloetzli, who was 99, is shown above in a photo taken about a decade ago. Services will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at St. John's Lutheran Church, on Sweet Air Road in Jacksonville.The Sun regrets the error.Walter Kloetzli arrived in the United States speaking noEnglish in 1914 but became known for his style as banquet manager at one of Baltimore's most highly regarded hotels.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 26, 2009
Bertha Sander, a longtime member of Zion Lutheran Church at City Hall Plaza where for years she helped prepare and serve at the church's famous sour beef dinners, died of a cardiac arrest Oct. 19 at Oak Crest Village. She was 101. Bertha Prag, the daughter of farmers, was born and raised in Jagstheim in the Swabia region of southwest Germany. In 1928, she immigrated to Baltimore, where she worked as a governess and during the 1930s in quality control at the old Calvert Distillery in Relay.
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FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1997
As the great Baltimore hotel debate continues, Kemp C. Gatling, 85, of Rodgers Forge, thinks back to the glory days when he managed the Hotel Emerson, whose lobby always seemed to be filled with celebrities, politicians and sports teams.Gatling, who began his hotel career in 1927 as an "elevator boy" at the Monticello Hotel in Norfolk, Va., recently recalled one of his first celebrity assignments there handling the luggage of Harry K. Thaw, the Pittsburgh millionaire who created a turn-of-the-century sensation when he murdered society architect Stanford White.
NEWS
March 29, 1998
The photo that appeared in yesterday's editions with the obituary of Walter Kloetzli, longtime banquet manager of the old Emerson Hotel, was incorrect. Mr. Kloetzli, who was 99, is shown above in a photo taken about a decade ago. Services will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at St. John's Lutheran Church, on Sweet Air Road in Jacksonville.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 3/31/98
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | March 28, 1995
A BANK NOW occupies the northwest corner of Calvert and Baltimore streets. But there isn't even a plaque noting that the storied Emerson Hotel once stood in that spot.Storied -- because the hotel was born in story and remained steeped in stories for all of its long life -- nearly 60 years; it opened in 1911, closed in 1969, and was torn down in May 1971.The Emerson Hotel was built -- legend has it -- because one sweltering hot afternoon in 1910 or so Capt. Isaac Emerson (the Bromo-Seltzer inventor)
NEWS
March 29, 1998
The photo that appeared in yesterday's editions with the obituary of Walter Kloetzli, longtime banquet manager of the old Emerson Hotel, was incorrect. Mr. Kloetzli, who was 99, is shown above in a photo taken about a decade ago. Services will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at St. John's Lutheran Church, on Sweet Air Road in Jacksonville.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 3/31/98
NEWS
April 20, 1993
In mid-1971, a group of three men, each equipped with a walkie-talkie, appeared at the auction of the old Emerson Hotel in downtown Baltimore. Without announcing their affiliation, they quietly purchased (for a song) many of the hotel's beds, bureaus and chairs. The next day a truck hauled them to Loyola College, where they were used to equip dormitories.The Emerson Hotel caper was one of many engineered by the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, Loyola's president since 1964. "You have to be something of an operator to be successful in this business," President Sellinger said later.
NEWS
May 17, 1993
August Sander, a German immigrant and retired master chef who had served two U.S. presidents and a German king, died Wednesday of kidney failure at the Meridian Multi-Medical Nursing Center in Towson. He was 86.Kaiser Wilhelm II and presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and Gerald R. Ford were among the dignitaries Mr. Sander served during a career that spanned more than 40 years.Other notables he served included Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey and actress Jean Harlow.While at the Hotel Kasten in Hanover, Germany, he served Kaiser Wilhelm II, who had been living in exile in Holland but secretly made visits to Germany.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | August 16, 1994
WITH SOME key statewide political races looking unpredictable this fall, the pundits probably will call some of the races "hard fought" after the elections.But probably no contest will equal what many view as the hardest fought local election in recent history. It was the 1938 Democratic primary election when Tommy D'Alesandro Jr., in his first race for Congress, beat 3rd District incumbent Vincent Palmisano. That campaign had everything -- wild electioneering, premature victory celebrations, calls for recounts.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 18, 1995
My heart began to sink somewhere in the middle of Eutaw Place.I had just spent the morning touring the fabled Emersonian and Esplanade apartment houses, the facing pair of classic, pre-World I buildings that were in the news recently.Workers were putting the finishing touches on the renovation of the Esplanade at 2519-29 Eutaw Place. It's nearly all rented and its exterior probably looks as good as it ever did.All its apartments were gutted, and given new walls and energy-efficient windows, central air-conditioning, modern kitchens and baths.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1998
The photo that appeared in yesterday's editions with the obituary of Walter Kloetzli, longtime banquet manager of the old Emerson Hotel, was incorrect. Mr. Kloetzli, who was 99, is shown above in a photo taken about a decade ago. Services will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at St. John's Lutheran Church, on Sweet Air Road in Jacksonville.The Sun regrets the error.Walter Kloetzli arrived in the United States speaking noEnglish in 1914 but became known for his style as banquet manager at one of Baltimore's most highly regarded hotels.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1997
As the great Baltimore hotel debate continues, Kemp C. Gatling, 85, of Rodgers Forge, thinks back to the glory days when he managed the Hotel Emerson, whose lobby always seemed to be filled with celebrities, politicians and sports teams.Gatling, who began his hotel career in 1927 as an "elevator boy" at the Monticello Hotel in Norfolk, Va., recently recalled one of his first celebrity assignments there handling the luggage of Harry K. Thaw, the Pittsburgh millionaire who created a turn-of-the-century sensation when he murdered society architect Stanford White.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 18, 1995
My heart began to sink somewhere in the middle of Eutaw Place.I had just spent the morning touring the fabled Emersonian and Esplanade apartment houses, the facing pair of classic, pre-World I buildings that were in the news recently.Workers were putting the finishing touches on the renovation of the Esplanade at 2519-29 Eutaw Place. It's nearly all rented and its exterior probably looks as good as it ever did.All its apartments were gutted, and given new walls and energy-efficient windows, central air-conditioning, modern kitchens and baths.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | March 28, 1995
A BANK NOW occupies the northwest corner of Calvert and Baltimore streets. But there isn't even a plaque noting that the storied Emerson Hotel once stood in that spot.Storied -- because the hotel was born in story and remained steeped in stories for all of its long life -- nearly 60 years; it opened in 1911, closed in 1969, and was torn down in May 1971.The Emerson Hotel was built -- legend has it -- because one sweltering hot afternoon in 1910 or so Capt. Isaac Emerson (the Bromo-Seltzer inventor)
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | August 16, 1994
WITH SOME key statewide political races looking unpredictable this fall, the pundits probably will call some of the races "hard fought" after the elections.But probably no contest will equal what many view as the hardest fought local election in recent history. It was the 1938 Democratic primary election when Tommy D'Alesandro Jr., in his first race for Congress, beat 3rd District incumbent Vincent Palmisano. That campaign had everything -- wild electioneering, premature victory celebrations, calls for recounts.
NEWS
May 17, 1993
August Sander, a German immigrant and retired master chef who had served two U.S. presidents and a German king, died Wednesday of kidney failure at the Meridian Multi-Medical Nursing Center in Towson. He was 86.Kaiser Wilhelm II and presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and Gerald R. Ford were among the dignitaries Mr. Sander served during a career that spanned more than 40 years.Other notables he served included Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey and actress Jean Harlow.While at the Hotel Kasten in Hanover, Germany, he served Kaiser Wilhelm II, who had been living in exile in Holland but secretly made visits to Germany.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | February 9, 1993
THE Downtown Partnership of Baltimore has hired 35 "public safety guides" to work the streets, starting March 1, as goodwill ambassadors and tour guides. They'll be joined by 28 "clean and sweep ambassadors," all part of an effort to spiff up the old city.I'm all for it. Downtown Baltimore, for all its much publicized noise and traffic and panhandlers and crime, remains the undisputed nerve center of the area's business community. It is also the metropolitan area's cultural heart. Here's an early Valentine to downtown!
NEWS
By Jane M. Earhart | November 22, 1991
THE SHIP docked mid-morning Friday, Nov. 22. Friends and I were returning to New York City from a cruise in the Bahamas and planned to complete the vacation with a weekend of fun and frolic in the Big Apple.Immediately after our hotel check-in, we were off to "do the shops" on Fifth Avenue. First stop was Saks. I bought a blue and white silk scarf, which today I can't wear without the memories of that day flooding back.Going up in the elevator at Saks, we overheard two ladies discussing "yet another tragedy in that family."
NEWS
April 20, 1993
In mid-1971, a group of three men, each equipped with a walkie-talkie, appeared at the auction of the old Emerson Hotel in downtown Baltimore. Without announcing their affiliation, they quietly purchased (for a song) many of the hotel's beds, bureaus and chairs. The next day a truck hauled them to Loyola College, where they were used to equip dormitories.The Emerson Hotel caper was one of many engineered by the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, Loyola's president since 1964. "You have to be something of an operator to be successful in this business," President Sellinger said later.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | February 9, 1993
THE Downtown Partnership of Baltimore has hired 35 "public safety guides" to work the streets, starting March 1, as goodwill ambassadors and tour guides. They'll be joined by 28 "clean and sweep ambassadors," all part of an effort to spiff up the old city.I'm all for it. Downtown Baltimore, for all its much publicized noise and traffic and panhandlers and crime, remains the undisputed nerve center of the area's business community. It is also the metropolitan area's cultural heart. Here's an early Valentine to downtown!
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