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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1995
Mary Ann Vecchio was a troubled teen who had panhandled her way to the Kent State University campus from Opa-Locka, Fla. John Filo was the son of a steelworker, a senior ready to embark on a journalism career. J. Gregory Payne was a University of Illinois undergraduate with law school on his mind.On May 4, 1970, their lives entwined irrevocably when four students at Kent State were slain by the Ohio National Guard.Photographed by Mr. Filo as she cried in horror over Jeffrey Miller's hemorrhaging body, Mary Ann, 14, instantly became an icon symbolizing the cost of conviction in America.
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By CANDUS THOMSON | December 23, 2007
Bill Heavey's humor columns make dandy bookmarks. That's a compliment. For a number of years, I have been carefully tearing the back page out of Field and Stream, underlining his best lines and archiving them in travel books, cookbooks and the latest best-seller that resides in my personal library on the toilet tank. This is my way of acknowledging both his writing skill and the fact that my alma mater, Emerson College (sadly named for Charles Wesley, the carnival barker, not Ralph Waldo, the essayist)
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NEWS
February 1, 1994
ON MANY college campuses, computers have become the newest tool to fight racial and ethnic intolerance. Last October, Vanderbilt University released an interactive computer program for this purpose, called the "Diversity Opportunity Tool."The goal of the project's director, Alma R. Clayton-Pedersen, was to teach individuals how to react when confronted with racial or ethnic insensitivity. Ms. Clayton-Pedersen feels that despite the public's growing racial awareness, people are still unsure how to deal with such situations.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 9, 2004
On a bare stage, seated at a table with a notebook and a glass of water as his sole companions, Spalding Gray would quietly regale audiences with intensely personal monologues on such subjects as sex, drugs, therapy, infidelity and a family history of suicide. The monologist, actor and writer was confirmed dead yesterday after having disappeared from his Manhattan apartment two months ago. Although the cause of death was still being investigated, Gray had attempted suicide in the past.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 23, 2007
Bill Heavey's humor columns make dandy bookmarks. That's a compliment. For a number of years, I have been carefully tearing the back page out of Field and Stream, underlining his best lines and archiving them in travel books, cookbooks and the latest best-seller that resides in my personal library on the toilet tank. This is my way of acknowledging both his writing skill and the fact that my alma mater, Emerson College (sadly named for Charles Wesley, the carnival barker, not Ralph Waldo, the essayist)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 9, 2004
On a bare stage, seated at a table with a notebook and a glass of water as his sole companions, Spalding Gray would quietly regale audiences with intensely personal monologues on such subjects as sex, drugs, therapy, infidelity and a family history of suicide. The monologist, actor and writer was confirmed dead yesterday after having disappeared from his Manhattan apartment two months ago. Although the cause of death was still being investigated, Gray had attempted suicide in the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
If you are one of the 1.2 million viewers the Comedy Central series "Broad City" attracts on average each week, you might have noticed a nod to Baltimore in the recent episode "Stolen Phone. " When a distraught Ilana - one of the show's two protagonists - bangs on the door of her phoneless best friend's New York City apartment after a panicked search, Abbi calmly greets her in a black-and-teal Maryland Institute College of Art sweatshirt. No, it was not a thrift shop find or a random hoodie selected by the wardrobe department.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1996
In Shakespeare's day, all the roles were played by men. The Company of Women reverses that practice on Monday and Tuesdaywith an all-female production of the Bard's classic "King Lear" at Goucher College.Company co-founder Kristin Linklater, a theater professor at Boston's Emerson College who runs the company along with author and Harvard professor Carol Gilligan, will play Lear. 12-year-old girl will play the wise Fool. The production is directed by Maureen Shea, who is Emerson's theater director.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | July 13, 1995
Attorney Charles A. Kasky will begin work Monday as legislative coordinator for Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker.As legislative coordinator, the 40-year-old Columbia resident will be responsible for drafting legislation proposed by Mr. Ecker. He also will act as a liaison to the County Council, which must approve legislative proposals if they are to become law.A graduate of Emerson College in Boston, Mr. Kasky has been working for the General Assembly in Annapolis since 1989 as counsel to the Department of Legislative Reference.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1998
New positionsSolomon, Scott take posts at culinary instituteBaltimore International College appointed Steven H. Solomon director of public affairs and William A. Scott Jr. director of enrollment management.Solomon, a graduate of Fairleigh Dickinson University, was formerly vice president of the Cherenson Group. He resides in Forest Hill.Scott, a Columbia resident, graduated from Delaware State University and was director of admissions for Lincoln Technical Institute prior to joining the culinary arts and hospitality school.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1995
Mary Ann Vecchio was a troubled teen who had panhandled her way to the Kent State University campus from Opa-Locka, Fla. John Filo was the son of a steelworker, a senior ready to embark on a journalism career. J. Gregory Payne was a University of Illinois undergraduate with law school on his mind.On May 4, 1970, their lives entwined irrevocably when four students at Kent State were slain by the Ohio National Guard.Photographed by Mr. Filo as she cried in horror over Jeffrey Miller's hemorrhaging body, Mary Ann, 14, instantly became an icon symbolizing the cost of conviction in America.
NEWS
February 1, 1994
ON MANY college campuses, computers have become the newest tool to fight racial and ethnic intolerance. Last October, Vanderbilt University released an interactive computer program for this purpose, called the "Diversity Opportunity Tool."The goal of the project's director, Alma R. Clayton-Pedersen, was to teach individuals how to react when confronted with racial or ethnic insensitivity. Ms. Clayton-Pedersen feels that despite the public's growing racial awareness, people are still unsure how to deal with such situations.
FEATURES
March 14, 1993
Beth Gilmore, a senior at Mount de Sales Academy, served as a page for the General Assembly in February.*Diane Levine, an English teacher at Bryn Mawr School, is the 1993 recipient of the Mrs. Lucy Eastwood Broadus Memorial Award for travel abroad.*Brian Elieson, Joseph Fisher and Graham Watson, three Calvert Hall College students, have been named finalists in the National Merit Scholarship program.*Dolph Habeck, a junior at Severn School, was selected as the first-place winner in the Southern Maryland district level competition of the American Legion National High School Oratorical Contest held in February in Laurel.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1997
Joyce Helene Dinsmoor, a speech and language pathologist with Baltimore public schools for more than 20 years, died Wednesday of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She lived in Columbia and was 47.From 1971 to 1993, Mrs. Dinsmoor was a city schools language specialist, working with autistic children and their families at several elementary schools, mostly in East Baltimore."She was always searching and always studying and always learning," said Jackie Reeder, who worked with Mrs. Dinsmoor for several years in the 1970s at Charles Carroll of Carrollton School in East Baltimore.
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