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By Steven Syre and Charles Stein and Steven Syre and Charles Stein,BOSTON GLOBE | May 16, 1999
Mark Madden has been waiting years now for a market like this.He doesn't own suddenly rediscovered value stocks or an obscure corner of commerce blessed by the Internet bug. Madden, manager of the Pioneer Emerging Markets fund, is invested in Asia, Latin America and developing economies in Europe.Madden and other managers like him are among some of the best performers of the mutual fund world this year. His emerging markets fund was up 27.7 percent for 1999 as of the other day, and most of its competitors have gained 20 percent or more.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
Businesses in China and India, the emerging markets that Gov. Martin O'Malley has been trawling for trade relationships, are beginning to bite. This month, the governor announced the opening of a Chinese bank in Baltimore and conducted a forum for Indian business leaders, priming them to open U.S. subsidiaries in the state. The events could be a turning point for investment in Maryland from these countries. "Europe is struggling and global companies want to go to stable environments," said Nancy McLernon, president and CEO of the Organization for International Investment, a Washington-based nonprofit business association for U.S. subsidiaries of foreign companies.
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BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | March 15, 1995
Maybe it's not such a small world after all.With the domestic stock market percolating and certificate of deposit yields strong, the once-booming emerging markets have become submerged markets.The rush of new money has been short-circuited. Many investors yanked money out quickly, the worst way to play these younger markets.Because emerging markets declined 2.42 percent in dollar terms last year, compared to a gain of 3.36 percent by major world markets, it's easy to forget that investing in them can still make sense.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Long known for spicing up American food, McCormick & Co. is taking its food flavorings abroad, with plans to peddle masala powder in the open-air markets of India and borscht seasoning in the stores of Eastern Europe. Looking for ways to beef up sales in the face of a weak economy and a mature domestic market , the Sparks-based spice maker is increasing its push into emerging nations. McCormick, like other food companies, sees potential for growth in regions where American brands are becoming more commonplace — and gaining market share by expanding their lines to include products demanded by local consumers.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 1996
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Worried about the direction of the U.S. stock market and willing to place a bet on the global economy? Remember, U.S. stocks are hardly the only game around. There are thousands of stocks in scores of markets worldwide -- and emerging markets, in particular, are hot again.Markets in these rapidly growing but still-developing nations often swing wildly. They fared poorly in 1994 and 1995. But they're rising again in 1996. And this time, unlike the last emerging market rally in 1993, the upturn should be durable, most pros say.From Taiwan to Malaysia to Mexico to Argentina, stock prices are cheap.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | August 14, 2005
IN THE LONG term, the case for emerging markets remains strong," The Economist magazine said in February 1997. Just how long, of course, was unknown and unsaid, but a few months later currencies, governments and stock markets started crashing across the Third World, prompting years of terrible investment returns. Now, eight years later, many investors seem to believe the long term has arrived. The Morgan Stanley Capital International emerging markets index hit 623.49 last week, an all-time high, more than twice its level of early 2003 and well north of the 571 peak reached in July 1997, before the plunge.
BUSINESS
By Jerry Morgan and Jerry Morgan,NEWSDAY | July 18, 1999
Emerging-market funds, a year ago considered submerging funds, have surfaced again with a vengeance, up 33 percent since the first of the year."There seems to be a lot of manic-depression investing in emerging markets," said Rajeev Bhaman, manager of Oppenheimer's Developing Markets Fund. "People get overly excited and invest, then get overly depressed and there are enormous swings in the market. The markets are very volatile because of people's perceptions."Those perceptions are based on reality.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | January 26, 1997
NEW YORK -- Investors are increasing their bets in emerging markets funds, and so are fund companies.STI Capital Management in Orlando, Fla., is one company that reckons emerging markets will be hot in 1997, so at the end of the month, it's opening a new fund, STI Emerging Markets Fund.Analysts expect STI will be getting much more company."We've heard a lot of chatter from fund companies" about starting emerging markets funds, said Michael Lipper, head of Lipper Analytical Services Inc. Twenty-eight funds (or new classes of funds)
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
W.R. Grace & Co. has opened a new manufacturing facility in Vietnam as part of its strategy to expand in emerging markets. The new facility was opened by the company's construction products division in the city of Hai Duong, near Hanoi. Grace celebrated the grand opening of the plant Wednesday. The 30,000-square-foot facility will manufacture cement additives and concrete admixtures. It will also house a sales and technical service office and a quality-control lab. Columbia-based Grace has also recently opened manufacturing plants in Chongqing, China, and Dammam, Saudi Arabia.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,Tribune Media Services | October 14, 2007
You have to love emerging market stocks. After all, they are up more than 36 percent for the year, an even more tantalizing return than the 31.6 percent average for each of the past five years. But should you love them and leave them? Analysts are starting to use the word bubble for emerging market stocks. Yet many are telling investors it's still not time to bolt. They urge investors to watch stock valuations and performance, along with the prospects for inflation or recession, to help determine where stocks are likely to be headed.
BUSINESS
by Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2011
McCormick & Co. Inc. said Wednesday it had entered into an agreement with a company in India to market and sell its basmati rice and other food products in the country. The Hunt Valley spicemaker expects to finalize the deal with Kohinoor Foods Ltd. later this year. McCormick said it will invest $115 and hold an 85 percent interest in the partnership. It will finance the deal through cash and debt. The joint venture will be named Kohinoor Specialty Foods India Private Ltd. Kohinoor sells its products in 350,000 retail stores in India and expects annual sales of $85 million this year.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
W.R. Grace & Co. has opened a new manufacturing facility in Vietnam as part of its strategy to expand in emerging markets. The new facility was opened by the company's construction products division in the city of Hai Duong, near Hanoi. Grace celebrated the grand opening of the plant Wednesday. The 30,000-square-foot facility will manufacture cement additives and concrete admixtures. It will also house a sales and technical service office and a quality-control lab. Columbia-based Grace has also recently opened manufacturing plants in Chongqing, China, and Dammam, Saudi Arabia.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Chicago Tribune | December 14, 2008
Individual investors who once envisioned global investing as a growth portion of their portfolios are feeling the pain. Emerging markets have been hit hard in the financial downturn. There's really nowhere to hide. Even though the worst might not be over as we look to 2009, some experts believe the situation provides opportunities to increase international investments because much of the rest of the world will revive before the U.S. does. "International stocks have been hit worse than U.S. stocks, but most of that difference has been due to the strength of the U.S. dollar," said Allan Nichols, equities strategist and editor of Morningstar International Investor in Chicago.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | July 1, 2008
Mohamed El-Erian's message at the Morningstar Investor Conference in Chicago last week could be boiled down to one simple, dangerous statement: "This time it's different." But if the global market conditions are as different as the co-chief executive and chief investment strategist at bond fund giant PIMCO contends, then the real concern for investors is why the proposed tactics to deal with "this time" feel so much like the same old thing. In a wide-ranging talk that covered everything from consumer finances to monetary policy, El-Erian said the markets' current problems are not the proverbial "random events," but rather a sequence of events - including the return of significant inflation and the realignment of global economic power - that lead the market to a new reality.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | January 8, 2008
The mutual fund that boasted one of the best runs in the fourth quarter - far outpacing the negative average return of peers - had almost one-third of its holdings in financial stocks. That may come as a surprise, given the global credit crisis that gripped many financial firms and sent domestic markets on a topsy-turvy course for the year. But T. Rowe Price Group Inc.'s Emerging Europe & Mediterranean Fund invests overseas in places that were largely sheltered from that turmoil, including some financial firms.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | January 8, 2008
Here are two good ones from the mail bag: Fidelity offered to look at my investment portfolio for free, so I took them up on it. After taking all of my information and asking some questions, the young man who met me said that I have "a hole in small-caps and emerging markets." He offered suggestions to fix it that sounded good, but I don't know. I want to keep things simple and I'm doing OK and I like the way I have things now. I never heard of the funds he said I should buy before. ... How bad off am I, really, if there's "a hole in my small caps," whatever that is?
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | February 28, 1999
Christopher Alderson knows first-hand how dicey it can be to manage a mutual fund that invests in developing countries.In the early 1990s, he was driven out of Malaysia at gunpoint by armed guards after asking "a lot of detailed questions of the Malaysian authorities." One guard even put a gun to Alderson's head."I got accused of being a spy," said Alderson, who manages the T. Rowe Price Emerging Market Stock Fund.Being pushed around by gun-toting heavies may be a hair-raising experience, but it almost pales in comparison with the plunging currency markets and cratering economies that have rocked the sector.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN | January 23, 1995
NEW YORK -- The best time to invest is when stocks are down and the press is singing their requiem. By that measure, you need to take a look at the mutual funds that buy emerging-market stocks.Much of the Pacific Rim had a terrible 1994. Hong Kong, Malaysia and Indonesia dropped 20 percent or more in dollar terms. In Latin America, Argentina and Mexico took a serious hit -- doubly so after Mexico devalued the peso last month.The average emerging-market fund was down 11 percent for the year and also looks sick in early 1995.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 21, 2007
International investing carries risks, but some funds find ways to reduce them. The political, economic and currency situations in foreign countries provide alternate periods of exhilaration and worry. The adventure can be rewarding but gut-wrenching. Yet some international funds with solid returns find ways to limit volatility, whether by diversifying among myriad countries, uncovering value-oriented firms or devoting only a portion of their portfolios to less-predictable emerging markets.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,Tribune Media Services | October 14, 2007
You have to love emerging market stocks. After all, they are up more than 36 percent for the year, an even more tantalizing return than the 31.6 percent average for each of the past five years. But should you love them and leave them? Analysts are starting to use the word bubble for emerging market stocks. Yet many are telling investors it's still not time to bolt. They urge investors to watch stock valuations and performance, along with the prospects for inflation or recession, to help determine where stocks are likely to be headed.
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