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By Linell Smith | February 12, 1992
WHEN the BAUhouse arts center opened two years ago, it offered a rich feast of visual arts, music, poetry, dance and theater untainted by commercial considerations. It gave Baltimore's unseasoned artists a highly visible post -- next to the Charles Theatre on Charles Street -- to display and refine their talents.Now buffeted by the same economic conditions that have hurt most arts organizations, the BAUhouse has stalled in its own attempts to emerge, reaching the edge of insolvency. On Saturday, the arts center will hold a "Live or Let Die" benefit party at "10" the Performance Centre (formerly Cignals)
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FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Doreen Bolger's home wasn't built for art. It's not one of those open-air boxes made of white walls and windows, the ceilings laced with pinpoint spotlights and the rooms furnished with sculpture instead of cozy settees. It is, instead, a failed attempt at a rowhouse on St. Paul Street in what was once Peabody Heights. The flat front and the breezeway side entrances were such a disappointment in 1872 that not another one was built. Inside, the home of the director of the Baltimore Museum of Art is warm, but so modestly lit that the stairs to the second floor should carry a warning.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 30, 1992
There were seven jurors for this year's BAUhouse Emerging Artists' Multi-Media Survey (BEAMS), and they all favored us with statements, from Symmes Gardner's paean to pluralism to Michael Weiss' "Good stuff all around."One can applaud Weiss' brevity without entirely agreeing with him. But if not everything in this show qualifies as good stuff, there's enough of interest to make this a worthwhile experience, especially in terms of artists who are not familiar to the viewing public.The pluralism that Gardner champions is a mixed blessing, but one of its advantages is that artists can stand out not for what they adhere to, but for what they are; they are less likely to be hailed or dismissed on the basis of what's in fashion.
NEWS
By Gena R. Chattin and Gena R. Chattin,Sun Reporter | February 18, 2007
Hundreds of the nation's leading artists in ceramics, glass, jewelry and other fine crafts will be in Baltimore this week for the annual American Craft Show. Now the largest juried, indoor craft show in the country, the event draws thousands of visitors each February to the Baltimore Convention Center. This is the Baltimore show's 31st year, but the event has its eyes on the future with two new categories that spotlight emerging artists and art for future generations. One is the kid-centric Craft 4 Kids, a category encompassing clothing, toys and decor for infants and small children.
NEWS
By Gena R. Chattin and Gena R. Chattin,Sun Reporter | February 18, 2007
Hundreds of the nation's leading artists in ceramics, glass, jewelry and other fine crafts will be in Baltimore this week for the annual American Craft Show. Now the largest juried, indoor craft show in the country, the event draws thousands of visitors each February to the Baltimore Convention Center. This is the Baltimore show's 31st year, but the event has its eyes on the future with two new categories that spotlight emerging artists and art for future generations. One is the kid-centric Craft 4 Kids, a category encompassing clothing, toys and decor for infants and small children.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Doreen Bolger's home wasn't built for art. It's not one of those open-air boxes made of white walls and windows, the ceilings laced with pinpoint spotlights and the rooms furnished with sculpture instead of cozy settees. It is, instead, a failed attempt at a rowhouse on St. Paul Street in what was once Peabody Heights. The flat front and the breezeway side entrances were such a disappointment in 1872 that not another one was built. Inside, the home of the director of the Baltimore Museum of Art is warm, but so modestly lit that the stairs to the second floor should carry a warning.
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | September 11, 1991
The BAUhouse's support of new work by emerging artists is that gallery's most important enterprise. And its second annual BEAMS exhibition (BAUhouse Emerging Artists' Multi-media Survey) may be the gallery's best show to date.Representing 39 artists from Virginia to Pennsylvania, the 50 works here include essays in painting, sculpture and newer forms incorporating such diverse media as photography, computer graphics and found objects. Each piece partakes of vitality and ingenuity in equal measure.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | October 25, 1992
The date of a performance at the Basilica of the Assumption by the choral group Gloriae Dei Cantores was reported incorrectly in yesterday's Arts and Entertainment section. The performance will be at 8 p.m. tomorrow.* The Sun regrets the error.Gloriae Dei Cantores to singGloriae Dei Cantores, which is developing a reputation as one of the finest choral groups in the United States, will appear Wednesday at 8 p.m. at the Basilica of the Assumption. Although the singers and their music director, Elizabeth Patterson, are noted for a wide repertory, they have developed a special identification with Russian music, and Wednesday's concert will include music by Glinka and Georgy Sviridov, who is Russia's greatest choral conductor as well as a well-known composer.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | May 29, 1993
Jorden Nye, co-owner of South Baltimore's Nye Gomez Gallery, is leaving the gallery as of Tuesday to resume working for the Internal Revenue Service.He has been with the gallery since October 1991, when he took over co-ownership from Gary Knight, one of the first two owners with Walter Gomez.Mr. Nye said yesterday that his reason for leaving was basically economic. Despite the gallery's success, with 1992 art sales up almost 40 percent over 1991, "the reality is that for the foreseeable future it will be difficult for it to support two owners with a decent salary."
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | February 12, 1992
When the BAUhouse arts center opened two years ago, it offered a rich feast of visual arts, music, poetry, dance and theater untainted by commercial considerations. It gave Baltimore's unseasoned artists a highly visible post -- next to the Charles Theatre on Charles Street -- to display and refine their talents.Now buffeted by the same economic conditions that have hurt most arts organizations, the BAUhouse has stalled in its own attempts to emerge, reaching the edge of insolvency. On Saturday, the arts center will hold a "Live or Let Die" benefit party at "10" the Performance Centre (formerly Cignals)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2005
In February, Susie Little was sitting in figure-painting class at the Carver Center for Art and Technology when her guidance counselor came in and pulled her out of the classroom. Usually, when a guidance counselor pulls a student out of class, it's either for something really good or something really bad. That day, it was something really good. Susie's mom was waiting for her outside the classroom, holding an envelope from the admissions department of Cooper Union in New York City. Last year, Susie, a 17-year-old senior, and her mom attended one of Cooper Union's open houses, where Susie presented her art portfolio for review.
NEWS
By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 21, 2000
REBECCA WEBER, owner of Sheppard Art Gallery in Ellicott City, has a clear sense of cultural purpose. Like any businessperson, Weber must make sales to remain in operation. The gallery's framing business ensures that Sheppard is a profitable venture, but sales are not Weber's primary motivation. "My goal is to help people learn to appreciate art," Weber said. "If someone comes in and just looks for half an hour, that means more to me than making a sale." For Weber, Sheppard has assumed even greater significance in recent years after the closing of the only downtown theater and the burning of Blues Alley in November.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOHN DORSEY | January 14, 1999
The Women Artists' Forum of Baltimore is a group of emerging professional artists founded in the spring of 1997 to learn about art-related issues. It is open to artists in the Baltimore region and so far has organized two shows of members' work. The current one is at Resurgam Gallery on South Charles Street and features works by 28 of the current 37 members. Among them are Helene Ageloff, Frances Aubrey, Mary Catalano, Ruth Channing, Marge Feldman, Nancy Linden, Sally Sanford Ney, Beverly Polt, Michelle Santos and Bert Wallace.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | January 10, 1999
Mission: To provide emerging and established artists with professional exhibition opportunities; encourage the study, practice, collection and appreciation of fine art in Maryland; and to provide educational opportunities for community enrichment and artists' professional development. Organized in 1963, the MFA has been operating the Gallery on the Circle in Annapolis since 1968.Latest accomplishments: Last spring, the gallery initiated the "Artists After School Workshop Series." The community outreach program provides mixed-media art programs for children in school-based afternoon care, culminating in an exhibit.
NEWS
July 14, 1994
Rising from the ashes of City Fair, the festival of neighborhood enthusiasm that made Baltimoreans feel better about their hometown, Artscape has been a summer tradition since the early 1980s.Each year, hundreds of thousands of people -- last year's crowd was estimated at more than a million -- trek to the vicinity of the Maryland Institute and Lyric Theater on Mount Royal Avenue. For three days they fairly overdose on art, crafts, literature, music and food.This year promises to be bigger than ever: Friday's free 8:15 p.m. kick-off concert brings to Baltimore none other than Aretha xTC Franklin, the Queen of Soul.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | May 29, 1993
Jorden Nye, co-owner of South Baltimore's Nye Gomez Gallery, is leaving the gallery as of Tuesday to resume working for the Internal Revenue Service.He has been with the gallery since October 1991, when he took over co-ownership from Gary Knight, one of the first two owners with Walter Gomez.Mr. Nye said yesterday that his reason for leaving was basically economic. Despite the gallery's success, with 1992 art sales up almost 40 percent over 1991, "the reality is that for the foreseeable future it will be difficult for it to support two owners with a decent salary."
NEWS
By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 21, 2000
REBECCA WEBER, owner of Sheppard Art Gallery in Ellicott City, has a clear sense of cultural purpose. Like any businessperson, Weber must make sales to remain in operation. The gallery's framing business ensures that Sheppard is a profitable venture, but sales are not Weber's primary motivation. "My goal is to help people learn to appreciate art," Weber said. "If someone comes in and just looks for half an hour, that means more to me than making a sale." For Weber, Sheppard has assumed even greater significance in recent years after the closing of the only downtown theater and the burning of Blues Alley in November.
NEWS
July 14, 1994
Rising from the ashes of City Fair, the festival of neighborhood enthusiasm that made Baltimoreans feel better about their hometown, Artscape has been a summer tradition since the early 1980s.Each year, hundreds of thousands of people -- last year's crowd was estimated at more than a million -- trek to the vicinity of the Maryland Institute and Lyric Theater on Mount Royal Avenue. For three days they fairly overdose on art, crafts, literature, music and food.This year promises to be bigger than ever: Friday's free 8:15 p.m. kick-off concert brings to Baltimore none other than Aretha xTC Franklin, the Queen of Soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 30, 1992
There were seven jurors for this year's BAUhouse Emerging Artists' Multi-Media Survey (BEAMS), and they all favored us with statements, from Symmes Gardner's paean to pluralism to Michael Weiss' "Good stuff all around."One can applaud Weiss' brevity without entirely agreeing with him. But if not everything in this show qualifies as good stuff, there's enough of interest to make this a worthwhile experience, especially in terms of artists who are not familiar to the viewing public.The pluralism that Gardner champions is a mixed blessing, but one of its advantages is that artists can stand out not for what they adhere to, but for what they are; they are less likely to be hailed or dismissed on the basis of what's in fashion.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | October 25, 1992
The date of a performance at the Basilica of the Assumption by the choral group Gloriae Dei Cantores was reported incorrectly in yesterday's Arts and Entertainment section. The performance will be at 8 p.m. tomorrow.* The Sun regrets the error.Gloriae Dei Cantores to singGloriae Dei Cantores, which is developing a reputation as one of the finest choral groups in the United States, will appear Wednesday at 8 p.m. at the Basilica of the Assumption. Although the singers and their music director, Elizabeth Patterson, are noted for a wide repertory, they have developed a special identification with Russian music, and Wednesday's concert will include music by Glinka and Georgy Sviridov, who is Russia's greatest choral conductor as well as a well-known composer.
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