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February 22, 2013
Emergency equipment responding to incidents for assistance need the right of way. The Laurel Volunteer Fire Department's fire technicians or drivers have been instructed by county fire department driving regulations to come to a complete stop at all red traffic lights and stop signs, but we still need everyone's help to ensure that we can get there both quickly and safely. It could mean the difference between life and death. When you see lights or hear sirens, we ask you to: Immediately yield the right of way. This can be done by calmly and carefully pulling to the right edge of the roadway.
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NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman, mtilghman@tribune.com | May 15, 2014
Plans for a new Towson firehouse moved forward Wednesday when the Design Review Panel voted to approve the design for the brick two-story structure planned for the corner of Bosley Avenue and Towsontown Boulevard. Area residents were on hand to express concerns about the building's plain design, as well as worries about traffic and noise. The firehouse design calls for with five bays for emergency vehicles and a two-story wing with 12 dorm rooms, kitchen, storage and meeting space, according to David Recchia, a partner and vice president of Towson architectural firm Rubeling & Associates, which designed the building.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2000
Troubled by collisions that result from police cars responding to emergencies, City Councilwoman Lisa Joi Stancil wants to impose penalties on officers who violate traffic regulations and motorists who fail to yield to emergency vehicles. Under the legislation awaiting a public hearing, police officers could not exceed the maximum speed for city streets. Officers who violate the proposed ordinance or motorists who fail to yield to emergency vehicles would be fined $1,000 and be subject to a court-ordered driver's education course.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
After a tow truck operator from Green's Garage stopped on the shoulder of Interstate 795 in Reisterstown in January to help a motorist, she ended up needing a wrecker herself. A distracted driver veered off the road and hit her truck, causing nearly $10,000 in damage, according to Larry Green, owner of the Hampstead towing business and president of the Towing & Recovery Professionals of Maryland. The truck operator was not injured, Green said, but she and others face constant danger.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2003
Attempting to ensure that emergency vehicles can get to fire scenes on narrow roads, Hampstead officials are trying to strike a balance between public safety and parking convenience for residents. To make the narrower town roads more accessible to fire engines and snowplows, the town has proposed limiting parking to one side of four streets. "This is a tough balancing act on an issue that broaches public safety for people who have been able to park on the street for as long as they have owned their homes," said Mayor Haven N. Shoemaker Jr. "We are asking them to make a radical change."
NEWS
December 15, 2000
IT'S A BASIC RULE of driving. When emergency sirens are blaring and lights are flashing, drivers must get out of the way. But too often, some motorists seem to think they have other options when a firetruck or rescue vehicle is racing to help someone. These drivers refuse to yield. Or they panic and stop, impeding the rescue. And then there are the motorists who, incredibly, cut in front of emergency vehicles. They must have slept through driver's ed classes. So let's review: Motorists are required to pull to the right in ideal driving situations and onto the shoulder of the road if one exists.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2010
Annapolis drivers and pedestrians can expect traffic congestion Monday around St. John's College, as police and fire departments conduct an emergency exercise on the campus. People can expect see emergency equipment, including ambulances and police vehicles, for the exercise that starts at 9 a.m. and runs for several hours. The nature of the exercise is not being disclosed. This will be the second mock emergency response drill in the area in a week. On Tuesday, Anne Arundel County police and other agencies spent half a day at Downs Park in Pasadena for a mock search and rescue for three missing adults who had dementia.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
An emergency drill is being conducted by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. at its Spring Gardens facility in South Baltimore on Thursday morning. The drill began at 7 a.m. and will last through noon "to provide an opportunity for BGE and Baltimore City Emergency Management and first responders to practice emergency management procedures to ensure readiness, part of BGE's commitment to the safety of employees and the communities we serve," the company...
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
The sirens are blaring. The lights are flashing. For some drivers, it's not a signal to pull over and let the ambulance, police cruiser or firetruck pass. Instead, they panic and stop, Annapolis public safety officials say -- or worse, they pass and pull in front of emergency vehicles. But officials have begun to crack down on drivers who fail to yield to emergency vehicles, issuing tickets that carry a $60 fine and one point on their driver's licenses. Last week, police began following ambulances and firetrucks to ensure drivers are pulling over safely, said Annapolis police Officer Eric E. Crane, a department spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | March 24, 1993
Noise Cancellation Technologies Inc. has found a new marke for its electronic sound reduction system: wailing and screaming firetrucks and ambulances.NCT said yesterday that it reached an agreement with the Federal Signal Corp., the nation's largest maker of emergency vehicles, sirens and other equipment for police, fire and emergency vehicles, to market and distribute its noise reduction equipment.The agreement, expected to result in $30 million in business for NCT over the next five years, includes the sale of headsets to eliminate about 70 percent of the siren noise inside emergency vehicles.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
An emergency drill is being conducted by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. at its Spring Gardens facility in South Baltimore on Thursday morning. The drill began at 7 a.m. and will last through noon "to provide an opportunity for BGE and Baltimore City Emergency Management and first responders to practice emergency management procedures to ensure readiness, part of BGE's commitment to the safety of employees and the communities we serve," the company...
NEWS
Staff Reports | September 25, 2013
A county project to realign a portion of Landing Road in Ellicott City is scheduled to begin Tuesday, Oct. 1, according to Howard County officials. About 500 feet of Landing Road will be realigned at Ilchester Road to tie in directly with Ilchester Point Court. As part of the project, a right-turn lane will be added to northbound Ilchester Road. During construction, part of Landing Road will be closed to through traffic, although driveways will remain accessible to residents and emergency vehicles.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2013
Emergency equipment responding to incidents for assistance need the right of way. The Laurel Volunteer Fire Department's fire technicians or drivers have been instructed by county fire department driving regulations to come to a complete stop at all red traffic lights and stop signs, but we still need everyone's help to ensure that we can get there both quickly and safely. It could mean the difference between life and death. When you see lights or hear sirens, we ask you to: Immediately yield the right of way. This can be done by calmly and carefully pulling to the right edge of the roadway.
NEWS
By Ashley Halsey III, The Washington Post | February 20, 2011
FedEx is a shipping company — except on football Sundays in Washington. Verizon is a communications company, unless professional hockey is being played at the home of the Capitals. Verizon competes with Comcast, unless you're talking about the home court of the University of Maryland Terrapins. Now, State Farm Insurance wants to be identified as a good Samaritan by drivers whose cars go kaput on Maryland highways. Just like FedEx, Verizon and Comcast, the insurance company has entered into a partnership — albeit somewhat less glamorous than the others — with the state of Maryland.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2010
Annapolis drivers and pedestrians can expect traffic congestion Monday around St. John's College, as police and fire departments conduct an emergency exercise on the campus. People can expect see emergency equipment, including ambulances and police vehicles, for the exercise that starts at 9 a.m. and runs for several hours. The nature of the exercise is not being disclosed. This will be the second mock emergency response drill in the area in a week. On Tuesday, Anne Arundel County police and other agencies spent half a day at Downs Park in Pasadena for a mock search and rescue for three missing adults who had dementia.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | February 10, 2010
State lawmakers are considering several proposals to require drivers to slow down and move over for emergency and towing vehicles that have pulled to the side of the road. Maryland is one of just three states without a "move over" law, said Sen. Nancy Jacobs, a Harford and Cecil County Republican who is sponsoring one of the measures. Several other senators have similar proposals, which are largely supported by fire and police unions and the State Highway Administration. Jacobs' bill would require drivers to vacate the lane closest to the shoulder where an emergency vehicle with active lights has stopped.
NEWS
Staff Reports | September 25, 2013
A county project to realign a portion of Landing Road in Ellicott City is scheduled to begin Tuesday, Oct. 1, according to Howard County officials. About 500 feet of Landing Road will be realigned at Ilchester Road to tie in directly with Ilchester Point Court. As part of the project, a right-turn lane will be added to northbound Ilchester Road. During construction, part of Landing Road will be closed to through traffic, although driveways will remain accessible to residents and emergency vehicles.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2002
An Anne Arundel County police officer was injured in a crash late Monday as he sped north on Crain Highway to assist another officer, county police said. Cpl. Edward Kuentzel, a 17-year veteran, injured his chest and rib cage in the accident. He was released from the Maryland Shock Trauma Center yesterday, a hospital spokeswoman said. The officer's 1999 Ford Crown Victoria collided with a 1996 Honda Accord and then careened into a signal pole at Fifth Avenue and Crain Highway in Glen Burnie just before midnight, police said.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 10, 2010
The snow has been coming down hard for a few hours, and coupled with 40-plus mile an hour winds, area roads are "beyond treacherous," according to the State Highway Administration. There are some vehicles moving on major highways, but in many cases, the roads are down to one lane and crews are having difficulty keeping those open, said David Buck, administration spokesman. "This is a white-out, deteriorating condition," said Buck. "This is not a day to be outside." Officials are encouraging people not to drive.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | December 13, 2007
The Baltimore Fire Department released yesterday the names of the four firefighters involved in a fatal accident that killed three people in a sport utility vehicle Sunday. The driver of Truck 27 was Nathaniel D. Moore, 40, a firefighter and paramedic apprentice who joined the department three years ago, a department spokesman said. Passengers on the truck were identified as Lt. Thomas Moore, a 33-year veteran, not related to the driver; Darryl Alexander, a 25-year veteran; and Kenneth Jacobs, a 13-year veteran.
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