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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 3, 1994
RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- The emergency room attendants who fell ill from so-called mystery fumes in February while treating a dying cancer patient probably succumbed to mass hysteria, California's Department of Health Services concluded in a report released yesterday.It is also plausible, state officials said, that a few hospital staff members were exposed to something that made them ill and that others reacted "to the stressful situation." But if there was an exposure to something, its identity remains unknown, said Dr. Ana Maria Osorio, chief of the health department's Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control and co-author of the report.
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NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2002
A Baltimore Circuit Court jury found yesterday that two emergency room doctors at Union Memorial Hospital committed malpractice that led to the death of a Baltimore man and must pay $1.05 million in damages to his family. After listening to two weeks of testimony and then deliberating for two hours, the jury decided Dr. Drory Tendler and Dr. Christopher Price should have diagnosed a blood clot in the lungs of Christian J. Walch, 76. Instead, they told him he had pneumonia when he visited the emergency room in December 1999.
NEWS
By Lionel Foster | September 7, 2012
I'm from the part of Baltimore that was knocked down. I grew up with a clear line of sight to the giant white letters spelling "Johns Hopkins" on the hospital's Monument Street campus. It was like my neighborhood's version of the Hollywood sign: tall, prestigious and distant, despite being just blocks away. This was the '80s, years before large sections of Baltimore's Middle East were seized under eminent domain and leveled after being scouted as the setting for a biotechnology park.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The rapid decline in health and ultimate death of a woman from fungal meningitis at Johns Hopkins Hospital after she'd received a tainted steroid injection was outlined by a team of Hopkins doctors in a medical journal article released online Thursday. The article, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, says a 51-year-old woman arrived at a local emergency room at the end of August with a headache "radiating" from the back of her head to her face. She'd received the steroid injection a week earlier.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Elisha King and Carl Schoettler and Elisha King,Evening Sun Staff | July 11, 1991
Police are awaiting the results of a psychiatric evaluation before deciding whether to file criminal charges against a 326-pound man who, investigators said, threatened emergency room workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital with a knife.A police officer brought Glenn A. Beasman, of the 3800 block of Bayonne Ave., to Hopkins for a psychiatric evaluation. After the officer left the emergency room about 3 p.m., Beasman pulled a 7-inch knife from his pocket and threatened emergency room workers, said police spokesman Dennis Hill.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
North Arundel Hospital has joined some hospitals in the state in adding physician assistants to speed emergency room care, resulting in an average 20-minute cut in waiting times, a spokesman said yesterday."
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
Brandy Dopkin gave her then-11/2-year-old daughter Jordana a snack — a small piece of multigrain bread topped with peanut butter — just before they headed to Jordana's music class. At the time, the child showed no indications of a food allergy. But that changed during the class: Someone noticed that Jordana's skin was breaking out in hives. Dopkin decided to take her daughter home, but by the time they arrived, Jordana's eyes were swollen shut and welts had formed on her neck.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's gun control bill faces a crucial test this week, when it is expected to receive committee votes in the House of Delegates. Although the legislation passed the Senate with strong support - and despite polling showing the vast majority of Marylanders approve of its key elements - it has produced some grumbling in the House, and not just from Republicans, who have stood unified in opposition to the measure. Lawmakers are likely to consider a host of amendments to the legislation, some of which are reasonable and some of which are not. Perhaps the trickiest area of the legislation is the standard it sets for who, by virtue of mental illness, should be prevented from buying a gun. Existing state law prohibits purchases by those who are found not criminally responsible or incompetent to stand trial because of mental illness - those provisions are not controversial - and anyone who has spent 30 consecutive days in an inpatient mental health facility.
NEWS
By JORGE VALENCIA and JORGE VALENCIA,SUN REPORTER | August 4, 2006
Howard County General Hospital will add a 10-bed mental health unit to its emergency room that will ease admission of involuntary psychiatric patients and improve emergency operations, hospital officials confirmed this week. The $775,000 project is scheduled to begin next week and be completed by January, said Beth Plavner, the hospital's construction consultant. It will be an addition of almost 2,200 square feet and will have three locked rooms and seven cubicles -- expanding the emergency room from 36 adult beds to 46. The unit would be staffed with a nurse and a hospital security guard 24 hours a day, according to Debbie Fleischmann, administrative director of the Emergency Department.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2013
Nearly 10,000 people in West Baltimore are diagnosed each year with new cases of diabetes, hypertension and other treatable, chronic health conditions — enough to fill 24 jumbo jets. These illnesses will kill many of them and complications will disable others who may end up in wheelchairs or have limbs amputated because they didn't get the proper medical care. This is the evidence the West Baltimore Primary Care Access Collaborative, a coalition of 16 hospitals and nonprofit organizations, gave state health officials as they sought to join a state program that provides financial incentives in an effort to curb health disparities in the state through the creation of special zones.
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