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NEWS
By From Staff Reports | July 19, 1994
The emergency room at Carroll County General Hospital, flooded Sunday during a heavy rainstorm, was expected to reopen today, according to hospital officials.Patients in need of emergency medical attention yesterday were sent 50 feet down the hall to the hospital's ambulatory surgery center, where the emergency room staff was temporarily located.The flooding came during a downpour that dumped 3.58 inches of rain on Westminster in about three hours Sunday afternoon. Water leaked through the emergency room ceiling, turning the room into a wading pool several inches deep.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 1, 1994
BAKERSFIELD, Calif. -- A second bizarre emergency room incident in which a fuming body felled medical personnel during the Saturday evening rush was probably unrelated to the first case, authorities said yesterday.Nineteen emergency room workers at Mercy Hospital here had to be decontaminated Saturday night after ammonia-like fumes from an unidentified 44-year-old woman caused minor dizziness, headaches and difficulties breathing.Steve McCalley, head of Kern County's environmental health department, said late yesterday that the victim ingested a common household pesticide called Dursban, which is sold over the counter and used to kill ants and other insects.
NEWS
By a Sun Staff Writer | January 1, 1995
Equipment and extra beds aren't the only additions to the new emergency room at Carroll County General Hospital.Susan R. Vittek joined the hospital staff in November as the clinical manager of the emergency department.Mrs. Vittek will play a major role in managing the daily operations of the department, as well as handling budget and staffing issues.For the past eight years, Mrs. Vittek has worked in the emergency department at Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown.For the past 2 1/2 years, she was nurse manager of the department, which handles 35,000 patients annually.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2010
Elizabeth Ann "Lizann" Donovan, a registered nurse whose career spanned more than 50 years, died Tuesday of multiple organ failure at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. The Chestertown resident was 77. Elizabeth Ann Curtin, the daughter of a chemist and an educator, was born and raised in Syracuse, N.Y. She was a 1950 graduate of Most Holy Rosary High School in Syracuse and earned her nursing degree from the St. Joseph Hospital School of Nursing, also in Syracuse.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 28, 1999
Black patients with broken arms or legs were less likely to be given painkillers in an Atlanta emergency room than white patients with similar injuries and complaints of pain, a new study has found.Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta examined the charts of 127 black patients and 90 white patients treated by 37 doctors at the hospital, which was not identified, from 1992 to 1995. They found that 43 percent of black patients with fractures of the extremities received no pain medication in the emergency room, while 26 percent of white patients with similar injuries went untreated for pain.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Area hospitals are coping with a surge of patients with achy bodies, fevers and sore throats as the nation grapples with a flu season that has hit earlier and harder than usual. The flu virus is unpredictable, so no one knows when the outbreak will peak or how bad the season will be, but a doctor said the pieces are in place to potentially make it one of the worst influenza seasons in recent years. The principal strain infecting people this year is one generally associated with more severe symptoms, said Dr. Andrea Dugas, an emergency room physician at Johns Hopkins Hospital who is leading research on the flu virus.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
A man who shot himself in the head outside the emergency room in North Baltimore's Union Memorial Hospital on Thursday left a note indicating he chose that locale because he wanted to donate his organs to medicine, according to law enforcement source. Baltimore police reported that the 29-year-old man was severely injured and later transferred to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he was in critical condition Thursday night. Officials declined to discuss other details about the note or the motivation, other than to say that homicide detectives are investigating the incident.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1999
It was splashy. It was so customer-friendly it was almost aggressive. It was expensive to build and promote -- a $16 million facility with a quarter-million-dollar advertising budget. But could Sinai Hospital's new emergency room, dubbed ER-7 for its seven care zones, actually attract patients? Could amenities -- such as private waiting rooms with videophones -- TV ads and high-tech care draw people? Or would patients, in a real emergency, simply head for the nearest hospital?
HEALTH
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Enrollees in an innovative Howard County health access plan for the uninsured visited emegency rooms and were admitted to hospitals much less than the national average last year, according to a report that is being cheered by supporters of the plan and questioned by critics. Figures for the Healthy Howard program were collected by David Holtgrave, chairman of the Department of Health, Behavior and Society at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and showed that in 2009, 8.5 percent of the roughly 515 Healthy Howard members studied made an emergency room visit and 2 percent were admitted to a hospital.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 9, 2010
Dr. William Dawson Lynn, a retired Baltimore surgeon and medical school professor who was an avid collector of flags, died March 2 at the Brightwood Center in Lutherville from complications of a fall. He was 91. Dr. Lynn, the son of a surgeon and a registered nurse, was born in Baltimore and spent his early years on Preston Street before moving to Rugby Road. Dr. Lynn's interest in medicine began early in his life. "He used to go to the hospital and watch his father operate and go on rounds," said a son, James Nelson Lynn, who lives in Lutherville.
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