Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEmergency Physicians
IN THE NEWS

Emergency Physicians

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 16, 2006
Did you know?-- Drowning is the third-leading cause of accidental death in the U.S., killing nearly 5,000 people each year. - American College of Emergency Physicians
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 17, 2014
Maryland was ranked 10 th among the states for its emergency medical services, according to a new assessment by the American College of Emergency Physicians . The state got an overall ranking of a C, better than the national grade of D+. And the emergency system got top ranking for the category focused on quality and patient safety. That was largely based on protocols established by the state's unique management system, Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, for how emergency and trauma care is triaged and where patients are taken.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 5, 1991
North Arundel Hospital Emergency Department's Assistant Director Richard T. Fields has recently become a Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians.Fields has been on North Arundel's staff for the past nine years, becoming board-certified in emergency medicine in 1989.He is a member of the Anne Arundel County Medical Society and resides in Severna Park with his wife and two children.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
As the nation implements health care reform, emergency care has never been more important. We treat everyone, from babies to seniors, and we see the full spectrum of medical problems that exist. We are available at all times for all people. A new report by the RAND Corporation finds that emergency physicians are playing a role in reducing health care costs. This report urges policymakers and hospital administrators to pay closer attention to the role that emergency physicians can play in evaluating, managing and preventing hospital admissions.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
As the nation implements health care reform, emergency care has never been more important. We treat everyone, from babies to seniors, and we see the full spectrum of medical problems that exist. We are available at all times for all people. A new report by the RAND Corporation finds that emergency physicians are playing a role in reducing health care costs. This report urges policymakers and hospital administrators to pay closer attention to the role that emergency physicians can play in evaluating, managing and preventing hospital admissions.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
The lack of mental health resources in the United States has contributed to a significant increase in visits to the emergency department ("How to care for mentally ill people?" Jan. 8). Psychiatric emergencies grew by 131 percent between 2000 and 2007, according to a recent study. Psychiatric patients often "board" in the hallways of emergency department for several days, waiting for inpatient psychiatric services. This contributes to overcrowding which harms everyone. Emergency physicians are dedicated to providing a medical home for any patient who can't access medical care including people with health insurance who are unable to get timely appointments with their primary care physicians.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1996
Patients who are treated at Carroll County General Hospital's emergency room can expect more attention from doctors and a greater emphasis on follow-up care, now that the emergency department is under the management of a new physician group, hospital officials say.Emergency Medical Associates, a Rockville-based physician group, assumed leadership of the hospital's emergency department a month ago, replacing Professional Emergency Physicians, the hospital's provider...
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
A state disciplinary board has charged an emergency room physician at Carroll County General Hospital with illegally prescribing a painkiller to the relative of a nurse.The Maryland Board of Physician Quality Assurance alleges that the doctor prescribed the painkiller Dilaudid at the request of the nurse, who was addicted to the drug.The board filed charges Tuesday against Dr. Robert L. Gossweiler, 61, an attending physician in Carroll County General's emergency room.According to the charging papers, in December 1993 a nurse in the hospital's emergency department asked Dr. Gossweiler to prescribe a painkiller for a relative who had been diagnosed with inoperable cancer.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 17, 2014
Maryland was ranked 10 th among the states for its emergency medical services, according to a new assessment by the American College of Emergency Physicians . The state got an overall ranking of a C, better than the national grade of D+. And the emergency system got top ranking for the category focused on quality and patient safety. That was largely based on protocols established by the state's unique management system, Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, for how emergency and trauma care is triaged and where patients are taken.
NEWS
August 11, 2011
In response to the coverage of a new health care facility in Columbia ("Patient First to open Columbia medical center," Aug. 5), it should be noted that urgent care centers are not equal alternatives to emergency rooms. They are options for common medical problems when a physician's office is closed or unable to provide an appointment. The fact is, the vast majority people seeking emergency care need to be there. Only 8 percent of patients are non-urgent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and non-urgent "doesn't mean unnecessary" by the government's definition.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
The lack of mental health resources in the United States has contributed to a significant increase in visits to the emergency department ("How to care for mentally ill people?" Jan. 8). Psychiatric emergencies grew by 131 percent between 2000 and 2007, according to a recent study. Psychiatric patients often "board" in the hallways of emergency department for several days, waiting for inpatient psychiatric services. This contributes to overcrowding which harms everyone. Emergency physicians are dedicated to providing a medical home for any patient who can't access medical care including people with health insurance who are unable to get timely appointments with their primary care physicians.
NEWS
August 11, 2011
In response to the coverage of a new health care facility in Columbia ("Patient First to open Columbia medical center," Aug. 5), it should be noted that urgent care centers are not equal alternatives to emergency rooms. They are options for common medical problems when a physician's office is closed or unable to provide an appointment. The fact is, the vast majority people seeking emergency care need to be there. Only 8 percent of patients are non-urgent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and non-urgent "doesn't mean unnecessary" by the government's definition.
NEWS
June 16, 2006
Did you know?-- Drowning is the third-leading cause of accidental death in the U.S., killing nearly 5,000 people each year. - American College of Emergency Physicians
NEWS
May 26, 2005
Dr. Douglas James McPhee, an emergency room physician, died of a stroke May 17 at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Ellicott City resident was 38. Born in Towson and raised in Bel Air, he was co-valedictorian of his 1985 class at C. Milton Wright High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in biology at Loyola College and was a 1993 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. After a residency at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., Dr. McPhee returned to Maryland and became an emergency room physician at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2001
Dr. Eugene J. Riley, a pioneer in emergency medicine and retired chief of the emergency room at St. Joseph Medical Center, died Friday at the hospital of acute respiratory distress. He was 82. Dr. Riley was one of six physicians who transformed St. Joseph's emergency room in 1968 by replacing the interns who ran it with experienced surgeons who gave up their private practices to work there full time. His work led to the founding of the American College of Emergency Physicians, an organization that grew from fewer than two dozen doctors to nearly 20,000 today.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1997
Seeking to set a national standard for the definition of an "emergency," two members of Maryland's congressional delegation plan to introduce legislation that would prohibit HMOs from denying payment for emergency medical services after the fact.Such denials are a complaint across the country from emergency physicians and people insured by health maintenance organizations. And the stories are all the same: A person arrives at the emergency room, believing something may be seriously ** wrong.
NEWS
February 21, 1996
Plans must include emergency careThe Sun's Jan. 31 article, "Doctors, HMOs call truce in Annapolis," reports on an understanding between managed care plans and the state medical society of Maryland.We commend this cooperation, but the agreement language requires emergency physicians to obtain permission from managed care gatekeepers to treat subscribers who present non-life-threatening conditions.Federal law mandates that emergency departments screen and stabilize all patients regardless of ability to pay, and prohibits any delay to inquire about insurance or obtain approval from third parties.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2001
Dr. Eugene J. Riley, a pioneer in emergency medicine and retired chief of the emergency room at St. Joseph Medical Center, died Friday at the hospital of acute respiratory distress. He was 82. Dr. Riley was one of six physicians who transformed St. Joseph's emergency room in 1968 by replacing the interns who ran it with experienced surgeons who gave up their private practices to work there full time. His work led to the founding of the American College of Emergency Physicians, an organization that grew from fewer than two dozen doctors to nearly 20,000 today.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.