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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 11, 1991
When Tennessee trauma surgeon Kimball I. Maull takes over Feb. 10 as the head of Maryland's statewide emergency medical services, he will find himself operating a system shocked and traumatized by state budget cutbacks.In all, by next July, the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services System budget for statewide services in the field will have been slashed from $6.8 million to $2.7 million, MIEMSS spokeswoman Rochelle Cohen said.Meanwhile, the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore has lost $1.2 million in state budget allocations and anticipated Medicaid reimbursements.
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NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | November 20, 1991
County volunteer fire companies may have more than one consolidationplan to consider at their annual convention in May.The fire companies were to vote at their convention on a single proposal to consolidate the authority of the governing structures for fire and emergency services. When the county's 14 fire companies voted on the proposalin October, it was narrowly approved, 8-6.At last night's meeting of the Emergency Services Planning Board,members expressed some concern that the proposal will not be approved at the convention, because two-thirds of the companies must approvechanges in the association's charter.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 21, 1996
The Carroll County Volunteer Firemen's Association's annual convention Saturday focused on how additional county dollars should be spent and the need to improve the group's relationship with the Board of County Commissioners.The association took action on both measures during its business meeting at the Pleasant Valley Volunteer Fire Company. About 65 volunteers attended the two-hour meeting.The measures call for:A committee to be created to write a job description for a liaison to work with the association and the commissioners.
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2004
FEIGNING BLINDNESS in a shadowy hallway of the "burn building," Carleigh Maness knows she has to feel her way out of danger. She runs her fingers over the fire hose couplings, searching for the directional markings that will lead her safely outside. Carleigh, 11, who lives in North Laurel, belongs to the Elkridge Volunteer Fire Department's Junior Firefighters, and she is training. The inside of the three-story burn building is completely black, a maze of doors and narrow passageways.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2001
With the flu season just getting under way, hospital emergency rooms throughout metropolitan Baltimore have been declaring "yellow alerts" this week -- meaning they are too busy to take additional patients. Though the number fluctuates from hour to hour, seven of the region's 21 hospitals were asking ambulances to take patients elsewhere by late afternoon yesterday. A day earlier, 17 said they were treating all the patients they could handle. "It's very busy," said Dr. Brian Browne, director of emergency medicine at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | January 26, 1993
The chairman of a gubernatorial commission that recently recommended a new oversight board for Maryland's emergency medical services spends part of his time in the emergency room at Carroll County General Hospital.At 41, Dr. James A. D'Orta wears half a dozen hats. One of them is senior partner in Professional Emergency Physicians, an eight-member Baltimore-based physicians group that contracts to provide emergency room physicians at Franklin Square, St. Agnes and CCGH.The group is also to provide emergency room physicians for the new Atlantic General Hospital, scheduled to open in Berlin in May.Dr.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1995
The nationwide trend toward privatizing ambulance services has not reached Howard County, but fire officials here say they want to be ready if the challenge comes.An evaluation report by a seven-member advisory panel organized last fall recommends that the county Department of Fire and Rescue stave off such an option by improving its services and its communication with citizens.Scheduled for release later this week, the report suggests giving community classes on cardiopulmonary resuscitation, outfitting fire engines with more life-saving equipment and hiring a medical director to oversee the department's emergency medical services (EMS)
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2000
Reese Community Volunteer Fire Company is threatening to sue the county firemen's association for withholding its share of county money for emergency medical services. While other Carroll companies are charging a minimum $200 for an ambulance call, Reese has remained steadfast in charging $5 despite pressure from Carroll County Volunteer Firemen's Association, which oversees the county's 14 fire companies and related associations. The association started ambulance billing two years ago, but the Reese members voted last year to not charge for emergency medical service.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1995
Anne Arundel County is considering whether a private company should provide a critical component of its emergency medical services -- a controversial idea some say could lead to life-threatening delays and raise the cost of service."
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1991
The line of emergency vehicles stretched down Redwood Street, red lights flashing, black crepe draping radiator grills.They had come to the University of Maryland at Baltimore yesterday to protest a nearly $1 million cut in the state's Emergency Medical Services system, funded through the university.The EMS field services train local emergency crews and provide a statewide medical communications network. They are being cut back as part of a $5.8 million slash in the over-all UMAB budget."In the long run, what it means is total degradation of the services that we've got now," said Christopher N. Amos, who works with the Washington County Volunteer Fire and Rescue )
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