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Emergency Medical

NEWS
January 25, 1993
The new president took his oath, gave his inaugural speech to the nation, and there, inching its way through the thousands of people heading for the parade route was . . .An ambulance from the West Friendship volunteer fire company?"
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Eric Siegel and Peter Hermann and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1997
Baltimore's fire chief has given up on a controversial idea to privatize the city's ambulance service, pleasing the heads of unions representing paramedics who warned such a move could cost lives.Chief Herman Williams Jr., who headed a board that examined the proposal, said through a spokesman yesterday that a private company could not provide emergency response cheaper than the city does for $8 million a year."Based on bids submitted, there is no cost-savings to privatize the ambulance service," said Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres, a Fire Department spokesman.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 11, 1991
When Tennessee trauma surgeon Kimball I. Maull takes over Feb. 10 as the head of Maryland's statewide emergency medical services, he will find himself operating a system shocked and traumatized by state budget cutbacks.In all, by next July, the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services System budget for statewide services in the field will have been slashed from $6.8 million to $2.7 million, MIEMSS spokeswoman Rochelle Cohen said.Meanwhile, the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore has lost $1.2 million in state budget allocations and anticipated Medicaid reimbursements.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | January 26, 1993
The chairman of a gubernatorial commission that recently recommended a new oversight board for Maryland's emergency medical services spends part of his time in the emergency room at Carroll County General Hospital.At 41, Dr. James A. D'Orta wears half a dozen hats. One of them is senior partner in Professional Emergency Physicians, an eight-member Baltimore-based physicians group that contracts to provide emergency room physicians at Franklin Square, St. Agnes and CCGH.The group is also to provide emergency room physicians for the new Atlantic General Hospital, scheduled to open in Berlin in May.Dr.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1995
The nationwide trend toward privatizing ambulance services has not reached Howard County, but fire officials here say they want to be ready if the challenge comes.An evaluation report by a seven-member advisory panel organized last fall recommends that the county Department of Fire and Rescue stave off such an option by improving its services and its communication with citizens.Scheduled for release later this week, the report suggests giving community classes on cardiopulmonary resuscitation, outfitting fire engines with more life-saving equipment and hiring a medical director to oversee the department's emergency medical services (EMS)
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1995
Anne Arundel County is considering whether a private company should provide a critical component of its emergency medical services -- a controversial idea some say could lead to life-threatening delays and raise the cost of service."
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2007
The radio in the emergency medical vehicle crackled - the stifling heat had overwhelmed someone on Lexington Street. Capt. Charles Cheelsman turned on the vehicle's lights and sirens and hit the accelerator. Cars swerved to get out of the way as he sped toward Lexington Market. When he got there, he found Murdis Ferguson, 52, drooping in a plastic chair. She had been walking with a friend, Celeste Gross, also 52, when she was overcome by the heat. Yesterday, the temperature hit 98 in the city, but it felt like 106, according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1991
The line of emergency vehicles stretched down Redwood Street, red lights flashing, black crepe draping radiator grills.They had come to the University of Maryland at Baltimore yesterday to protest a nearly $1 million cut in the state's Emergency Medical Services system, funded through the university.The EMS field services train local emergency crews and provide a statewide medical communications network. They are being cut back as part of a $5.8 million slash in the over-all UMAB budget."In the long run, what it means is total degradation of the services that we've got now," said Christopher N. Amos, who works with the Washington County Volunteer Fire and Rescue )
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | May 15, 1991
On March 24, Thomas John "T.J." Flaherty, 13, and his 3-year-old niece were watching television when he gave her a Lifesaver candy as his sister-in-law had told him to do.The candy would keep Dana Jill Flaherty from crying while her mother washed clothes.Almost immediately after putting the candy in her mouth, Dana started choking on it. Her lips began turning blue.T.J. didn't have time to get his adult brother, who was upstairs sleeping.So T.J. applied the Heimlich maneuver he had learned in the first grade.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2003
Hoping to improve the chances of saving lives of critically injured children, Carroll County paramedics are using a state grant to buy kid-sized resuscitation equipment and to train to better treat the youngest of patients. Ambulances at each of the 14 volunteer fire companies serving the county will carry a Broselow bag, a resuscitation kit that includes equipment in varying sizes to children. Jeff M. Fleming, a paramedic for Gamber and Community Fire Company, said the bag would cut the time it takes to sort through equipment to fit children, who he said account for about 10 percent of Carroll County's emergency calls.
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