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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 11, 1991
When Tennessee trauma surgeon Kimball I. Maull takes over Feb. 10 as the head of Maryland's statewide emergency medical services, he will find himself operating a system shocked and traumatized by state budget cutbacks.In all, by next July, the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services System budget for statewide services in the field will have been slashed from $6.8 million to $2.7 million, MIEMSS spokeswoman Rochelle Cohen said.Meanwhile, the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore has lost $1.2 million in state budget allocations and anticipated Medicaid reimbursements.
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NEWS
By Eileen Canzian and Eileen Canzian,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
Three Baltimore firefighters who rescued a baby from a burning rowhouse last month were honored for their heroism yesterday by the state's emergency medical system.Firefighters William Raab, Dan Stallings and Daryl Williams were among more than 30 individuals and organizations that were recognized by the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS), which runs the Maryland Shock Trauma Center and coordinates emergency medical services throughout the state.Those honored included two paramedics from Calvert County who extricated a motorist from the wreckage of a car, a state trooper from Allegany County who revived a man who had stopped breathing, and the Baltimore County Fire Department team that rescued a plumber who was buried alive when a ditch caved in.Though they and others honored yesterday were doing their jobs when they saved lives, "we want you to know that we do not take you for granted," Dr. Kimball I. Maull, the MIEMSS director, told the group.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | February 24, 2008
A deputy slumps to the ground. "Officer down! Officer down!" Three members of the Harford County Sheriff's Special Response Team, essentially a SWAT team, corner the suspect with their guns raised. As deputies scatter to secure the living room, the fallen officer lies motionless. An unarmed man in a black Kevlar bulletproof vest rushes in. Unlike the others, he carries no weapons, just two huge black packs, loaded with medicine and supplies. The unarmed man in the practice drill is Dr. Eric Nager, an emergency room doctor at Franklin Square Hospital, who often accompanies the team in barricade situations.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2005
On a recent frigid and wet evening at the Woodlawn Volunteer Fire Company, students from Woodlawn High School bundled up and happily shoveled the snow from the front of the station. Then the alarm sounded. Wesley Watson, a 17-year-old junior, raced into the firehouse and hopped aboard an ambulance with two of the department's paramedics. They raced -- sirens blaring and lights flashing -- to a car accident on Dogwood Road, where Watson helped take an injured person's vital signs. Watson and the other students are enrolled in a new Emergency Medical Services and Fire Rescue class at Woodlawn High.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | January 26, 1993
The chairman of a gubernatorial commission that recently recommended a new oversight board for Maryland's emergency medical services spends part of his time in the emergency room at Carroll County General Hospital.At 41, Dr. James A. D'Orta wears half a dozen hats. One of them is senior partner in Professional Emergency Physicians, an eight-member Baltimore-based physicians group that contracts to provide emergency room physicians at Franklin Square, St. Agnes and CCGH.The group is also to provide emergency room physicians for the new Atlantic General Hospital, scheduled to open in Berlin in May.Dr.
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2007
The radio in the emergency medical vehicle crackled - the stifling heat had overwhelmed someone on Lexington Street. Capt. Charles Cheelsman turned on the vehicle's lights and sirens and hit the accelerator. Cars swerved to get out of the way as he sped toward Lexington Market. When he got there, he found Murdis Ferguson, 52, drooping in a plastic chair. She had been walking with a friend, Celeste Gross, also 52, when she was overcome by the heat. Yesterday, the temperature hit 98 in the city, but it felt like 106, according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2000
Reese Community Volunteer Fire Company is threatening to sue the county firemen's association for withholding its share of county money for emergency medical services. While other Carroll companies are charging a minimum $200 for an ambulance call, Reese has remained steadfast in charging $5 despite pressure from Carroll County Volunteer Firemen's Association, which oversees the county's 14 fire companies and related associations. The association started ambulance billing two years ago, but the Reese members voted last year to not charge for emergency medical service.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1995
Anne Arundel County is considering whether a private company should provide a critical component of its emergency medical services -- a controversial idea some say could lead to life-threatening delays and raise the cost of service."
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1995
The nationwide trend toward privatizing ambulance services has not reached Howard County, but fire officials here say they want to be ready if the challenge comes.An evaluation report by a seven-member advisory panel organized last fall recommends that the county Department of Fire and Rescue stave off such an option by improving its services and its communication with citizens.Scheduled for release later this week, the report suggests giving community classes on cardiopulmonary resuscitation, outfitting fire engines with more life-saving equipment and hiring a medical director to oversee the department's emergency medical services (EMS)
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1991
The line of emergency vehicles stretched down Redwood Street, red lights flashing, black crepe draping radiator grills.They had come to the University of Maryland at Baltimore yesterday to protest a nearly $1 million cut in the state's Emergency Medical Services system, funded through the university.The EMS field services train local emergency crews and provide a statewide medical communications network. They are being cut back as part of a $5.8 million slash in the over-all UMAB budget."In the long run, what it means is total degradation of the services that we've got now," said Christopher N. Amos, who works with the Washington County Volunteer Fire and Rescue )
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