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Emergency Medical

NEWS
September 20, 1990
The other honorees are:Civilian Certificate of Honor:* Matthew Scott, 6, of Rockville, was at home when his mother had a seizure. He called 911 and requested an ambulance, then cared for his younger siblings during the absence of an adult.* Gertrude Kidd, of Fallston, a home-health care nurse, stopped the bleeding from a motorist's head within seconds after an accident, before paramedics arrived.* Margaret Johnson, of Bladensburg, saved a child whose clothes were engulfed in flames.* Joseph R. Snowberger, of Ridgely, was driving a dump truck when he saw another dump truck overturn and catch fire.
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NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | January 28, 2006
Feeling faint, Jose Cintron called 911 last month. Two emergency responders soon arrived at his Joppa home. One of them - a polite young man, Cintron recalls - knelt down and checked his blood pressure and blood oxygen level. "No one ever checks my oxygen," said Cintron, 67, who has experienced episodes of low blood pressure and shortness of breath since being hospitalized for pneumonia in 2004. "He said, `I'm not a doctor, so you should check with a doctor.'" Not only was the man not a doctor, but he wasn't even an emergency responder, police say. Robert Joseph Smith, 24, of Aberdeen, was arrested this week, accused of impersonating an emergency medical technician and of theft.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | May 15, 1991
On March 24, Thomas John "T.J." Flaherty, 13, and his 3-year-old niece were watching television when he gave her a Lifesaver candy as his sister-in-law had told him to do.The candy would keep Dana Jill Flaherty from crying while her mother washed clothes.Almost immediately after putting the candy in her mouth, Dana started choking on it. Her lips began turning blue.T.J. didn't have time to get his adult brother, who was upstairs sleeping.So T.J. applied the Heimlich maneuver he had learned in the first grade.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
Maryland ranked 10th and earned a B-minus in a state-by-state assessment of emergency medical care released today. A panel of experts appointed by the American College of Emergency Physicians evaluated emergency medical care available in each state and the District of Columbia based on 50 criteria, such as access to hospital emergency rooms and seat-belt laws. California ranked first, earning a high B. Arkansas finished last, receiving a D. The national average was a C-minus. States were given an overall grade and a ranking based on each of four categories: emergency care, quality and patient safety, public health and injury prevention, and the medical-liability environment.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | June 11, 1995
"Stay on the line . . . I'll tell you exactly what to do next."This potentially life-saving message comes from Harford County's 911 dispatchers. They want callers, often panicked, to realize that they can help a sick or injured person if they will listen to a few simple instructions.They also want callers to know that an ambulance is sent on an emergency no more than 30 seconds after a 911 call is received.The new messages are part of a Harford program called Emergency Medical Dispatch, which began in April to provide better medical assistance to county residents.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | January 21, 1992
Budget cuts and retirements, which have already caused Baltimore County police to put seasoned detectives back on the street and merge some patrol areas, are now forcing changes in firefighting services.Fire Chief Elwood H. Banister Jr. has ordered crews at four double-engine companies cut in half, starting Feb. 1, and crews on some of the county's eight ladder-rescue trucks trimmed from four to five.He also ordered changes in emergency medical services that a fire union leader said could leave coverage thinner in some areas and reassigned four hazardous-materials training officers to field jobs.
NEWS
By Sherry Stravino and Sherry Stravino,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2003
Harford County volunteer firefighters and emergency medical workers will hold a mass casualty drill at Edgewood High School from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 28. Volunteers will practice responding spontaneously to a disaster situation. With help from the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, a major disaster will be simulated. Last year, a train wreck was enacted. Upper Chesapeake Hospital in Bel Air and Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace also will participate.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | June 11, 1995
"Stay on the line . . . I'll tell you exactly what to do next."This potentially life-saving message comes from Harford County's 911 dispatchers. They want callers, often panicked, to realize that they can help a sick or injured person if they will listen to a few simple instructions.They also want callers to know that an ambulance is sent on an emergency no more than 30 seconds after a 911 call is received.The new messages are part of a Harford program called Emergency Medical Dispatch, which began in April to provide better medical assistance to county residents.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
In the aftermath of last week's terrorist attacks, local and state health authorities are stepping up efforts to prepare for a possible biological or chemical attack. They're tracking ambulance runs and hospital emergency rooms for certain symptoms, putting physicians and labs on alert and considering stockpiling drug supplies. Some of the actions are part of emergency plans already in place; others are steps officials are adding to make Maryland as prepared as possible. "We want to make sure our systems are geared up to respond as best we can," said Dr. Bob Bass, the state's emergency medical services director.
NEWS
By From staff reports | March 25, 2001
Bill to allow patients to choose practitioner or physician for care Patients in health maintenance organizations could select a nurse practitioner as their primary care physician under a bill approved yesterday by the House of Delegates. Backers of the bill, approved 73-49, said they want patients to have the option of choosing a physician or nurse practitioner to treat them and make decisions about their care. HMOs would not be permitted to require a patient to be seen by a nurse practitioner.
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