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Emergency Medical

NEWS
October 29, 1991
Like any other multi-billion-dollar enterprise, hospital care can develop hide-bound routines, protected by high priests of orthodoxy. Rare is the individual brave enough to challenge that orthodoxy with solid analysis of its weaknesses and a plan of action for improvement. Rarer still is that individual with the staying power and tenacity to bring the improvements finally into being.Dr. R Adams Cowley, who died Sunday at 74, was such a man. Beginning his surgical practice in Europe after World War II, he found himself on a treadmill, racing to save lives cast into grave jeopardy by the left-over instruments of war. He concluded, rightly, that the procedures intended to save lives were themselves hindering the process.
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NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- People wanting to become paramedics can now get training in Carroll County for the first time in the history of emergency medical services here, the county's Volunteer Ambulance Association said Wednesday.The 13 medical technicians currently enrolled in the paramedic class will be trained through a joint program between Essex and Carroll community colleges."This program has been in the works for about two years and we are excited about being able to train our people here," said Bruce Walz, chairman of the association's paramedic committee, a news conference at Westminster High School.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | March 6, 1993
Baltimore City paramedics are being trained in the use of endotracheal intubation, an emergency life-saving procedure expected to save "hundreds of lives a year."In the procedure, a tube is inserted into the throat to help remove obstacles from the esophagus and open airways so that oxygen can be quickly pumped into the lungs before any physical damage can occur.The procedure reduces the risk of brain damage or death and prevents the buildup of deadly acid in the body."The No. 1 priority of all medical teaching and practice is optimal management of the airway," said Dr. Richard Alcorta, acting emergency medical services director of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS)
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | October 13, 1992
It was a helpless feeling in the face of a possible heart attack, says Michael A. Buckley, a cardiac rescue technician with the Lineboro Volunteer Fire Co."We get there and this poor patient's lying there in pain and we can't do anything."Now they can.Lineboro's Basic Life Support ambulance became an Advanced Life Support system last week, equipped and staffed to provide the emergency aid that can be critical in cases of cardiac arrest, respiratory failure or loss of consciousness.The new status means that northeastern county residents will no longer have to wait for an ALS ambulance from Hampstead, nine miles away and a 15-minute drive at best.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | January 21, 1992
Budget cuts and retirements, which have already caused Baltimore County police to put seasoned detectives back on the street and merge some patrol areas, are now forcing changes in firefighting services.Fire Chief Elwood H. Banister Jr. has ordered crews at four double-engine companies cut in half, starting Feb. 1, and crews on some of the county's eight ladder-rescue trucks trimmed from four to five.He also ordered changes in emergency medical services that a fire union leader said could leave coverage thinner in some areas and reassigned four hazardous-materials training officers to field jobs.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | May 15, 1991
On March 24, Thomas John "T.J." Flaherty, 13, and his 3-year-old niece were watching television when he gave her a Lifesaver candy as his sister-in-law had told him to do.The candy would keep Dana Jill Flaherty from crying while her mother washed clothes.Almost immediately after putting the candy in her mouth, Dana started choking on it. Her lips began turning blue.T.J. didn't have time to get his adult brother, who was upstairs sleeping.So T.J. applied the Heimlich maneuver he had learned in the first grade.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
Maryland ranked 10th and earned a B-minus in a state-by-state assessment of emergency medical care released today. A panel of experts appointed by the American College of Emergency Physicians evaluated emergency medical care available in each state and the District of Columbia based on 50 criteria, such as access to hospital emergency rooms and seat-belt laws. California ranked first, earning a high B. Arkansas finished last, receiving a D. The national average was a C-minus. States were given an overall grade and a ranking based on each of four categories: emergency care, quality and patient safety, public health and injury prevention, and the medical-liability environment.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | June 11, 1995
"Stay on the line . . . I'll tell you exactly what to do next."This potentially life-saving message comes from Harford County's 911 dispatchers. They want callers, often panicked, to realize that they can help a sick or injured person if they will listen to a few simple instructions.They also want callers to know that an ambulance is sent on an emergency no more than 30 seconds after a 911 call is received.The new messages are part of a Harford program called Emergency Medical Dispatch, which began in April to provide better medical assistance to county residents.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | June 11, 1995
"Stay on the line . . . I'll tell you exactly what to do next."This potentially life-saving message comes from Harford County's 911 dispatchers. They want callers, often panicked, to realize that they can help a sick or injured person if they will listen to a few simple instructions.They also want callers to know that an ambulance is sent on an emergency no more than 30 seconds after a 911 call is received.The new messages are part of a Harford program called Emergency Medical Dispatch, which began in April to provide better medical assistance to county residents.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
In the aftermath of last week's terrorist attacks, local and state health authorities are stepping up efforts to prepare for a possible biological or chemical attack. They're tracking ambulance runs and hospital emergency rooms for certain symptoms, putting physicians and labs on alert and considering stockpiling drug supplies. Some of the actions are part of emergency plans already in place; others are steps officials are adding to make Maryland as prepared as possible. "We want to make sure our systems are geared up to respond as best we can," said Dr. Bob Bass, the state's emergency medical services director.
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