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By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
Maryland ranked 10th and earned a B-minus in a state-by-state assessment of emergency medical care released today. A panel of experts appointed by the American College of Emergency Physicians evaluated emergency medical care available in each state and the District of Columbia based on 50 criteria, such as access to hospital emergency rooms and seat-belt laws. California ranked first, earning a high B. Arkansas finished last, receiving a D. The national average was a C-minus. States were given an overall grade and a ranking based on each of four categories: emergency care, quality and patient safety, public health and injury prevention, and the medical-liability environment.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | June 11, 1995
"Stay on the line . . . I'll tell you exactly what to do next."This potentially life-saving message comes from Harford County's 911 dispatchers. They want callers, often panicked, to realize that they can help a sick or injured person if they will listen to a few simple instructions.They also want callers to know that an ambulance is sent on an emergency no more than 30 seconds after a 911 call is received.The new messages are part of a Harford program called Emergency Medical Dispatch, which began in April to provide better medical assistance to county residents.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | June 11, 1995
"Stay on the line . . . I'll tell you exactly what to do next."This potentially life-saving message comes from Harford County's 911 dispatchers. They want callers, often panicked, to realize that they can help a sick or injured person if they will listen to a few simple instructions.They also want callers to know that an ambulance is sent on an emergency no more than 30 seconds after a 911 call is received.The new messages are part of a Harford program called Emergency Medical Dispatch, which began in April to provide better medical assistance to county residents.
NEWS
By Sherry Stravino and Sherry Stravino,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2003
Harford County volunteer firefighters and emergency medical workers will hold a mass casualty drill at Edgewood High School from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 28. Volunteers will practice responding spontaneously to a disaster situation. With help from the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, a major disaster will be simulated. Last year, a train wreck was enacted. Upper Chesapeake Hospital in Bel Air and Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace also will participate.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
In the aftermath of last week's terrorist attacks, local and state health authorities are stepping up efforts to prepare for a possible biological or chemical attack. They're tracking ambulance runs and hospital emergency rooms for certain symptoms, putting physicians and labs on alert and considering stockpiling drug supplies. Some of the actions are part of emergency plans already in place; others are steps officials are adding to make Maryland as prepared as possible. "We want to make sure our systems are geared up to respond as best we can," said Dr. Bob Bass, the state's emergency medical services director.
NEWS
By From staff reports | March 25, 2001
Bill to allow patients to choose practitioner or physician for care Patients in health maintenance organizations could select a nurse practitioner as their primary care physician under a bill approved yesterday by the House of Delegates. Backers of the bill, approved 73-49, said they want patients to have the option of choosing a physician or nurse practitioner to treat them and make decisions about their care. HMOs would not be permitted to require a patient to be seen by a nurse practitioner.
NEWS
January 25, 1993
The new president took his oath, gave his inaugural speech to the nation, and there, inching its way through the thousands of people heading for the parade route was . . .An ambulance from the West Friendship volunteer fire company?"
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Eric Siegel and Peter Hermann and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1997
Baltimore's fire chief has given up on a controversial idea to privatize the city's ambulance service, pleasing the heads of unions representing paramedics who warned such a move could cost lives.Chief Herman Williams Jr., who headed a board that examined the proposal, said through a spokesman yesterday that a private company could not provide emergency response cheaper than the city does for $8 million a year."Based on bids submitted, there is no cost-savings to privatize the ambulance service," said Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres, a Fire Department spokesman.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 11, 1991
When Tennessee trauma surgeon Kimball I. Maull takes over Feb. 10 as the head of Maryland's statewide emergency medical services, he will find himself operating a system shocked and traumatized by state budget cutbacks.In all, by next July, the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services System budget for statewide services in the field will have been slashed from $6.8 million to $2.7 million, MIEMSS spokeswoman Rochelle Cohen said.Meanwhile, the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore has lost $1.2 million in state budget allocations and anticipated Medicaid reimbursements.
NEWS
By Eileen Canzian and Eileen Canzian,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
Three Baltimore firefighters who rescued a baby from a burning rowhouse last month were honored for their heroism yesterday by the state's emergency medical system.Firefighters William Raab, Dan Stallings and Daryl Williams were among more than 30 individuals and organizations that were recognized by the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS), which runs the Maryland Shock Trauma Center and coordinates emergency medical services throughout the state.Those honored included two paramedics from Calvert County who extricated a motorist from the wreckage of a car, a state trooper from Allegany County who revived a man who had stopped breathing, and the Baltimore County Fire Department team that rescued a plumber who was buried alive when a ditch caved in.Though they and others honored yesterday were doing their jobs when they saved lives, "we want you to know that we do not take you for granted," Dr. Kimball I. Maull, the MIEMSS director, told the group.
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