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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 26, 2003
Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens appointed a committee yesterday to study the Fire Department's $7.2 million overtime expenditures last fiscal year. The move is the second county government response to criticism that the department exceeded its overtime budget by more than $1 million and spent millions more on overtime than neighboring counties. Last week, the County Council requested an audit of the department. The eight-member committee, headed by Owens' senior economic adviser, Ronald McGuirk, will analyze the department's staffing practices and compare them with other jurisdictions.
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NEWS
October 24, 2004
The Sykesville-Freedom District Fire Department has launched a membership recruitment campaign, Who Will Answer The Call, with a goal of recruiting 25 new fire and Emergency Medical Services personnel in six months. Membership applications can be downloaded from a new Web site, www.sykesvillefire.org, which includes news and history of the Fire Department and information on how to contact personnel. The department is seeking new firefighting and emergency medical services volunteers, as well as for administrative duty, which includes fund raising, public relations, fire prevention and auxiliary work.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 16, 1993
NEW YORK -- A Brooklyn woman, pronounced dead by emergency medical technicians, lay on the floor of her apartment for at least two hours until an investigator from the city Medical Examiner's office heard a gurgling sound and realized she was alive.The woman, Nancy Vitale, 40, a teacher, was unconscious and in critical condition yesterday at Coney Island Hospital as the police, the Emergency Medical Service and the medical examiner's office defended their actions and said they were not responsible for failing to realize that she needed a doctor, not a coroner.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | March 12, 1995
Speeding ambulances and screaming sirens don't always improve a patient's chances of surviving an injury or illness. Sometimes, the trip itself can be deadly."
NEWS
May 11, 1993
Donna Geiman has been named 1993 nurse of the year from Carroll County General Hospital. She has been with the Westminster hospital for 18 years and works in the emergency department.John Sernulka, executive vice president of the hospital, said it is "proud that she is a member of our nursing staff and a neighbor in our community.""Her contributions to our hospital are invaluable," he said. "Her understanding that good nursing care is the foundation of a community hospital helps to raise the standard of care throughout our institution."
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- People wanting to become paramedics can now get training in Carroll County for the first time in the history of emergency medical services here, the county's Volunteer Ambulance Association said Wednesday.The 13 medical technicians currently enrolled in the paramedic class will be trained through a joint program between Essex and Carroll community colleges."This program has been in the works for about two years and we are excited about being able to train our people here," said Bruce Walz, chairman of the association's paramedic committee, a news conference at Westminster High School.
NEWS
September 20, 1990
The other honorees are:Civilian Certificate of Honor:* Matthew Scott, 6, of Rockville, was at home when his mother had a seizure. He called 911 and requested an ambulance, then cared for his younger siblings during the absence of an adult.* Gertrude Kidd, of Fallston, a home-health care nurse, stopped the bleeding from a motorist's head within seconds after an accident, before paramedics arrived.* Margaret Johnson, of Bladensburg, saved a child whose clothes were engulfed in flames.* Joseph R. Snowberger, of Ridgely, was driving a dump truck when he saw another dump truck overturn and catch fire.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | March 6, 1993
Baltimore City paramedics are being trained in the use of endotracheal intubation, an emergency life-saving procedure expected to save "hundreds of lives a year."In the procedure, a tube is inserted into the throat to help remove obstacles from the esophagus and open airways so that oxygen can be quickly pumped into the lungs before any physical damage can occur.The procedure reduces the risk of brain damage or death and prevents the buildup of deadly acid in the body."The No. 1 priority of all medical teaching and practice is optimal management of the airway," said Dr. Richard Alcorta, acting emergency medical services director of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS)
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Like any other multi-billion-dollar enterprise, hospital care can develop hide-bound routines, protected by high priests of orthodoxy. Rare is the individual brave enough to challenge that orthodoxy with solid analysis of its weaknesses and a plan of action for improvement. Rarer still is that individual with the staying power and tenacity to bring the improvements finally into being.Dr. R Adams Cowley, who died Sunday at 74, was such a man. Beginning his surgical practice in Europe after World War II, he found himself on a treadmill, racing to save lives cast into grave jeopardy by the left-over instruments of war. He concluded, rightly, that the procedures intended to save lives were themselves hindering the process.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | January 21, 1992
Budget cuts and retirements, which have already caused Baltimore County police to put seasoned detectives back on the street and merge some patrol areas, are now forcing changes in firefighting services.Fire Chief Elwood H. Banister Jr. has ordered crews at four double-engine companies cut in half, starting Feb. 1, and crews on some of the county's eight ladder-rescue trucks trimmed from four to five.He also ordered changes in emergency medical services that a fire union leader said could leave coverage thinner in some areas and reassigned four hazardous-materials training officers to field jobs.
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