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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2001
With the flu season just getting under way, hospital emergency rooms throughout metropolitan Baltimore have been declaring "yellow alerts" this week -- meaning they are too busy to take additional patients. Though the number fluctuates from hour to hour, seven of the region's 21 hospitals were asking ambulances to take patients elsewhere by late afternoon yesterday. A day earlier, 17 said they were treating all the patients they could handle. "It's very busy," said Dr. Brian Browne, director of emergency medicine at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
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NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | February 24, 2008
A deputy slumps to the ground. "Officer down! Officer down!" Three members of the Harford County Sheriff's Special Response Team, essentially a SWAT team, corner the suspect with their guns raised. As deputies scatter to secure the living room, the fallen officer lies motionless. An unarmed man in a black Kevlar bulletproof vest rushes in. Unlike the others, he carries no weapons, just two huge black packs, loaded with medicine and supplies. The unarmed man in the practice drill is Dr. Eric Nager, an emergency room doctor at Franklin Square Hospital, who often accompanies the team in barricade situations.
NEWS
June 3, 2001
Farmers' market opens this month in Westminster The Downtown Westminster Farmers' Market opens this month at the Sherwood Parking Lot on Railroad Avenue and Distillery Drive. The market will be held from 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays through Oct. 27. The farmers' market features fresh seasonal produce, including fruits, vegetables, herbs, honey, flowers, eggs, apple butter, raw and spun wool, and organically grown produce. All produce is delivered and sold directly by local farmers. The market is sponsored by the mayor and Common Council of Westminster.
NEWS
October 24, 2004
The Sykesville-Freedom District Fire Department has launched a membership recruitment campaign, Who Will Answer The Call, with a goal of recruiting 25 new fire and Emergency Medical Services personnel in six months. Membership applications can be downloaded from a new Web site, www.sykesvillefire.org, which includes news and history of the Fire Department and information on how to contact personnel. The department is seeking new firefighting and emergency medical services volunteers, as well as for administrative duty, which includes fund raising, public relations, fire prevention and auxiliary work.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 16, 1993
NEW YORK -- A Brooklyn woman, pronounced dead by emergency medical technicians, lay on the floor of her apartment for at least two hours until an investigator from the city Medical Examiner's office heard a gurgling sound and realized she was alive.The woman, Nancy Vitale, 40, a teacher, was unconscious and in critical condition yesterday at Coney Island Hospital as the police, the Emergency Medical Service and the medical examiner's office defended their actions and said they were not responsible for failing to realize that she needed a doctor, not a coroner.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 26, 2003
Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens appointed a committee yesterday to study the Fire Department's $7.2 million overtime expenditures last fiscal year. The move is the second county government response to criticism that the department exceeded its overtime budget by more than $1 million and spent millions more on overtime than neighboring counties. Last week, the County Council requested an audit of the department. The eight-member committee, headed by Owens' senior economic adviser, Ronald McGuirk, will analyze the department's staffing practices and compare them with other jurisdictions.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1995
Anne Arundel County is considering whether a private company should provide a critical component of its emergency medical services -- a controversial idea some say could lead to life-threatening delays and raise the cost of service."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | March 12, 1995
Speeding ambulances and screaming sirens don't always improve a patient's chances of surviving an injury or illness. Sometimes, the trip itself can be deadly."
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Like any other multi-billion-dollar enterprise, hospital care can develop hide-bound routines, protected by high priests of orthodoxy. Rare is the individual brave enough to challenge that orthodoxy with solid analysis of its weaknesses and a plan of action for improvement. Rarer still is that individual with the staying power and tenacity to bring the improvements finally into being.Dr. R Adams Cowley, who died Sunday at 74, was such a man. Beginning his surgical practice in Europe after World War II, he found himself on a treadmill, racing to save lives cast into grave jeopardy by the left-over instruments of war. He concluded, rightly, that the procedures intended to save lives were themselves hindering the process.
NEWS
May 11, 1993
Donna Geiman has been named 1993 nurse of the year from Carroll County General Hospital. She has been with the Westminster hospital for 18 years and works in the emergency department.John Sernulka, executive vice president of the hospital, said it is "proud that she is a member of our nursing staff and a neighbor in our community.""Her contributions to our hospital are invaluable," he said. "Her understanding that good nursing care is the foundation of a community hospital helps to raise the standard of care throughout our institution."
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