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Emergency Medical Services

NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 13, 2008
A bomb explodes. An airliner crashes. Fire engulfs an office tower. The list of calamities that could send hundreds of casualties to Maryland hospitals is limited only by the human imagination. As their counterparts elsewhere cope with earthquakes and tornadoes, the Marylanders charged with planning for the unimaginable say the state's emergency response infrastructure, communications networks, first-responders and hospitals are much improved since the events of Sept. 11, 2001. But worrisome vulnerabilities remain, they concede.
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NEWS
January 28, 2001
Use public funds to help train volunteer EMT's The Sun's article "Ambulance volunteers overwhelmed" (Dec. 19) examined a very real problem facing Emergency Medical Technicians and the Maryland counties they serve -- the viability of an all-volunteer system in the face of a growing suburban population and whether counties should supplement their volunteer EMTs with paid personnel. However that is resolved, another equally important problem faces volunteers today: the lack of up-to date training.
NEWS
December 23, 2008
A new proposal to create a Cabinet-level department to oversee Maryland's emergency medical services is no remedy for what ails the trauma care system. The idea, as floated by two legislators, sounds more like a grandiose prescription for trouble - and a scheme to privatize the state-run medevac helicopter service. The Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems has come under scrutiny since a state police helicopter crashed in Prince George's County in September while en route to a trauma center.
NEWS
March 15, 2009
Maryland's world-renowned emergency medical system took a hit when a state police helicopter crashed in Prince George's County last fall, killing four people on board. Subsequent calls for change in the way Maryland operates its emergency medical system prompted an intense review of policies on transporting patients to trauma centers around the state and that has led to some needed reforms, with more to come. But the emergency medical system's service to all Marylanders should be preserved as a publicly funded and operated network for accident victims.
NEWS
August 10, 1994
An article in some editions of The Evening Sun yesterday on the appointment of Dr. Robert Redwood Bass, executive director of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, incorrectly stated his duties. He does not supervise the R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, whose director is John W. Ashworth.The Evening Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
May 22, 2013
During the week of May 19-25, 2013, Maryland joins the rest of the nation in celebrating National Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Week. I commend the Maryland EMS providers who respond every day of every month to emergency situations, making our statewide EMS and trauma system a national model for life-saving care. With Gov. Martin O'Malley's commitment to public safety and the well-being of all Maryland's citizens, he has recognized the accomplishments of EMS providers by designating Emergency Medical Services Week in Maryland.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Using the national theme for EMS Week of "We're Ready -- Are You?" local emergency medical services personnel will kick off a celebration in Carroll County on Sunday.Activities during the week aim to educate the public about emergency medical care and how to use local emergency services.Other activities will include recognizing local EMS providers for their services throughout the year and highlighting ways to prevent injuries.Many Marylanders, including some from Carroll, will be honored May 27 at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore for their heroic, life-saving action or for distinguished service to the EMS community.
NEWS
By Kristina M. Schurr and Kristina M. Schurr,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 18, 1997
It's an emergency -- who ya gonna call?Well, it used to be the Anne Arundel County Fire Department.But not anymore.The department formerly known as Anne Arundel County Fire has a new moniker: Anne Arundel County EMS/Fire/Rescue.The new name reflects an essential shift in services, said Stephen D. Halford, county fire administrator."We used to be a fire department which occasionally handled emergency medical services calls. Our system has now evolved to the point where we are really an EMS department which occasionally handles fire calls," Halford said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | November 3, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Several organizations of doctors and nurses are recommending that the state's emergency medical system be removed from the University of Maryland's orbit to erase the possibility of a conflict of interest.As an alternative, they are calling for an independent board -- without direct ties to any hospital -- to oversee the system.The groups told a gubernatorial panel Friday that they were troubled by the affiliation of Emergency Medical Services with the Maryland Shock Trauma Center -- both of which fall under the broad umbrella of the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Paramedic Kevin Hook's vehicle speeds up Lombard Street, weaving through traffic. His 7 a.m. shift as acting lieutenant at Baltimore's John F. Steadman Fire Station has just begun and Hook is monitoring dozens of calls scrolling down a monitor mounted on the dashboard of his SUV. There's an oil spill requiring a hazardous materials team to the east, a car crash to the west and a victim suffering from a stroke ahead on West Baltimore Street....
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