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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
Dr. John D. Stafford, who established an emergency medical radio system for accident victims in the 1970s and was later a Maryland deputy health secretary, died of complications from diabetes March 26 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The White Marsh resident was 66. Born in Altoona, Pa., he was a 1968 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He completed his medical internship in the Army and while at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, he worked with patients burned in the Vietnam War. He then completed an anesthesiology residency at Baltimore City Hospitals and earned a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
William E. "Bill" Hathaway, an emergency medical services expert who taught the subject at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and earlier had served in the Army Intelligence Corps, died Nov. 1 of cancer at his home in Amherst, Va. The former Annapolis resident was 75. Mr. Hathaway was born in Chicago and moved in 1945 with his family to McLean, Va., where he graduated in 1955 from Fairfax High School. After graduating from West Point in 1961, he served in an artillery unit before joining the Intelligence Corps, where he worked in Washington for the Defense Intelligence Agency.
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NEWS
October 8, 2008
With a fatal accident on their watch and some lawmakers pressing for cutbacks to the state police helicopter fleet that ferries accident victims, Maryland's emergency medical professionals are on the defensive. They've revised the protocols paramedics use to identify which patients need to be airlifted to trauma centers and decided to bring in independent experts to assess the system's reliance on choppers. They're trying to get ahead of any attempt by the legislature to undercut the highly regarded system.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
A state panel charged with making recommendations on medical marijuana presented two divergent plans Friday, failing to find consensus on an issue that will likely be debated during the coming legislative session. The 22-member group, headed by Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, split almost evenly between two proposals. The first, backed by Sharfstein and the group's medical and law enforcement officials, would treat medical marijuana as an investigational drug.
NEWS
December 23, 2008
A new proposal to create a Cabinet-level department to oversee Maryland's emergency medical services is no remedy for what ails the trauma care system. The idea, as floated by two legislators, sounds more like a grandiose prescription for trouble - and a scheme to privatize the state-run medevac helicopter service. The Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems has come under scrutiny since a state police helicopter crashed in Prince George's County in September while en route to a trauma center.
NEWS
February 21, 2000
FEW DRIVERS know it, but they pay a fee so Maryland's shock-trauma system can continue its life-saving work -- the medevac helicopters, the paramedic units and the nine designated hospital trauma centers, including the renowned R Adams Cowley Center at University of Maryland Hospital. There's an $8 annual surcharge on Maryland's 2.2 million drivers when they renew their vehicle registrations. This supports a complex system that includes 32,000 emergency medical workers. Now the shock-trauma community is seeking $3 more on this surcharge.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Using the national theme for EMS Week of "We're Ready -- Are You?" local emergency medical services personnel will kick off a celebration in Carroll County on Sunday.Activities during the week aim to educate the public about emergency medical care and how to use local emergency services.Other activities will include recognizing local EMS providers for their services throughout the year and highlighting ways to prevent injuries.Many Marylanders, including some from Carroll, will be honored May 27 at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore for their heroic, life-saving action or for distinguished service to the EMS community.
NEWS
May 28, 1993
Six Anne Arundel County Fire Department employees received awards for heroism yesterday during a ceremony at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.Capt. Gary Sheckells, Chief Charles Rogers, firefighter Deborah Rodey, and acting Lt. Michele Delalla, an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), were awarded the Emergency Medical System Certificate of Honor for their rescue May 16, 1992, of a woman who was thrown from a raft in West Virginia.The four were off-duty at the time. The woman later died.Firefighter and EMT Barton Shortall and Lt. James D. Kruger also were awarded the EMS Certificate of Honor for treating two stabbing victims at the Maryland House of Corrections in Jessup on July 10, 1992.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | November 3, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Several organizations of doctors and nurses are recommending that the state's emergency medical system be removed from the University of Maryland's orbit to erase the possibility of a conflict of interest.As an alternative, they are calling for an independent board -- without direct ties to any hospital -- to oversee the system.The groups told a gubernatorial panel Friday that they were troubled by the affiliation of Emergency Medical Services with the Maryland Shock Trauma Center -- both of which fall under the broad umbrella of the University of Maryland.
NEWS
October 29, 1991
Funeral services for Dr. R Adams Cowley, emergency medicine pioneer will be held at 11 a.m. Nov. 4 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1400 Dulaney Valley Road.Graveside services at 2:30 p.m. at Arlington National Cemetery will follow.Dr. Cowley, 74, who created the concept of shock-trauma medicine and founded what became the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, died Sunday of coronary disease at his home in Baltimore.Dr. Cowley was a military surgeon in hospitals in post-war France and Germany, where he began his study of emergency medical techniques.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
The state of Maryland created one of the nation's first statewide emergency medical systems to ensure that patients got consistent and timely care no matter where they were. The Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems now oversees and coordinates the providers from the field to the emergency department, according to James W. Brown, director of educational support services, from headquarters in Baltimore. When was MIEMSS formed and what are its responsibilities now?
NEWS
March 15, 2009
Maryland's world-renowned emergency medical system took a hit when a state police helicopter crashed in Prince George's County last fall, killing four people on board. Subsequent calls for change in the way Maryland operates its emergency medical system prompted an intense review of policies on transporting patients to trauma centers around the state and that has led to some needed reforms, with more to come. But the emergency medical system's service to all Marylanders should be preserved as a publicly funded and operated network for accident victims.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | January 23, 2009
Police officials launched an emotional defense of Maryland's state-run medevac system yesterday, which faces a privatization initiative from General Assembly critics whose case for reform has been bolstered by a recent fatal crash and critical audit. A routine legislative briefing about Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget proposal to purchase two new helicopters turned into a heated exchange yesterday between the police major in charge of the medevac fleet and Sen. E.J. Pipkin, an Eastern Shore Republican who wants to require the police to compete for the job with private services.
NEWS
December 23, 2008
A new proposal to create a Cabinet-level department to oversee Maryland's emergency medical services is no remedy for what ails the trauma care system. The idea, as floated by two legislators, sounds more like a grandiose prescription for trouble - and a scheme to privatize the state-run medevac helicopter service. The Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems has come under scrutiny since a state police helicopter crashed in Prince George's County in September while en route to a trauma center.
NEWS
November 28, 2008
It took outside experts to say what supporters of Maryland's much-praised emergency medical services system probably needed to hear: that Maryland State Police helicopters could fly fewer accident victims to trauma centers across the state without compromising the safety of patients or the integrity of the care. But now comes the tough part: acting on the panel's recommendations. The findings of the seven-member panel may embolden critics of the system who say Maryland's emergency medical response system has come to rely on costly helicopter flights to transport accident victims to trauma centers when ambulances would get them to the hospital as quickly without compromising their health.
NEWS
October 8, 2008
With a fatal accident on their watch and some lawmakers pressing for cutbacks to the state police helicopter fleet that ferries accident victims, Maryland's emergency medical professionals are on the defensive. They've revised the protocols paramedics use to identify which patients need to be airlifted to trauma centers and decided to bring in independent experts to assess the system's reliance on choppers. They're trying to get ahead of any attempt by the legislature to undercut the highly regarded system.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | October 30, 1992
The controversial head of Maryland's emergency medical system told Carroll County Ambulance Association members two things they wanted to hear last night: He wants to upgrade cardiac rescue technicians to paramedic status and abolish limits on skills they are allowed to use.Dr. Kimball I. Maull, chief of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS), met with ambulance association members at the Carroll Emergency Operations Center in Westminster.He endorsed changes in the rules of the state's emergency rescue service but declined to specify when he wanted them put in place.
NEWS
December 2, 1997
County Fire Administrator Steven D. Halford is expected to promote 35 career firefighters during a ceremony at Anne Arundel Community College this morning.Halford announced yesterday that he will promote 11 firefighters to the rank of emergency medical technician/firefighter III, a position responsible for driving heavy fire apparatus.Eleven more firefighters will become emergency medical technician-paramedic/firefighters, or firefighters who have two additional years of training in advanced emergency medical life support.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,robert.little@baltsun.com | October 7, 2008
In a move that could reduce the number of medevac flights in Maryland, state emergency medical officials announced yesterday that ambulance teams will be required to consult with doctors before deciding whether flying some accident victims to a trauma center is better than driving them to a local hospital. The change, in response to a deadly helicopter crash in Prince George's County about a week ago, won't apply to victims with obviously traumatic injuries. But the state will stop automatically ordering medevac transportation based on the nature of an accident, as it does with hundreds of flights each year.
NEWS
September 12, 2008
When portable ultrasound machines become standard equipment for emergency medical crews, the ability to assess the internal injuries of accident and shooting victims on the spot should vastly improve. Until then, such teams in Maryland will continue to rely on their best judgment and a national checklist of standards to identify patients in need of air transport to a local trauma center. At least 4,500 patients are flown by state police helicopter to trauma centers across the state annually.
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