Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEmergency Department
IN THE NEWS

Emergency Department

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2011
Johns Hopkins Health System plans to open a $35 million expanded emergency department at Bayview Medical Center by January 2014, followed by a new oncology wing for its lung cancer treatment program. Preliminary plans for the expansion at the eastern Baltimore campus — which eventually would also include a seven-story hospital tower — were presented for review Thursday to the city's Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel. Bayview needs an expanded emergency department to meet growing community needs, said Michael Iati, senior director of architecture and planning for the health system.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
It's the weekend or nighttime, and someone in the family doesn't feel well or has hurt themselves. Many people assume the local hospital's emergency department is the best place to go for treatment, but an urgent care center may be a faster and cheaper way to get care for less serious conditions, according to Dr. William P. Jaquis, chief of emergency medicine at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore. LifeBridge Health, Sinai's parent company has recently partnered with ExpressCare urgent care centers.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | April 24, 1991
A $1.5 million expansion of Franklin Square Hospital Center's emergency department gets under way tomorrow with groundbreaking ceremonies for a project that is expected to nearly double the size of the hospital's emergency room.The project is expected to be completed in two phases, with a newly constructed waiting room area to open in April 1992 and a renovated emergency area to be completed by October 1992. The construction will allow the emergency department to grow from 10,000 square feet to 18,500 square feet, officials said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 17, 2014
Maryland was ranked 10 th among the states for its emergency medical services, according to a new assessment by the American College of Emergency Physicians . The state got an overall ranking of a C, better than the national grade of D+. And the emergency system got top ranking for the category focused on quality and patient safety. That was largely based on protocols established by the state's unique management system, Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, for how emergency and trauma care is triaged and where patients are taken.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | October 26, 2012
Linda Teixeira, of Laurel, is no stranger to emergency rooms. Her daughter is on dialysis and has other related health issues that require emergency care on a regular basis. What is new for Teixeira is that on this particular evening, she's waiting for her daughter in Laurel Regional Hospital's waiting room. "We live up the street and could walk here, but she was here a couple of times in the past and the service wasn't good, so we had been going to Howard General," Teixeira said.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2002
Carroll County General Hospital will break ground today on the first phase of an $80 million expansion - the largest in its 40-year history - that includes an enlarged emergency department and a four-story tower. The additions and improvements, approved by the Maryland Health Care Commission in January, will help the Westminster hospital meet the medical needs of a fast-growing county, hospital officials said. As part of the groundbreaking, the 172-bed hospital will launch Fulfilling the Promise, a campaign to raise $8 million in private funds for the project.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1997
A little Nordstrom. A little Disney. A little Mayo Clinic.In designing its glitzy new emergency room, Sinai Hospital is "trying to marry sophisticated clinical care with an exaggerated sense of caring for the whole family," says Warren A. Green, Sinai's president and chief executive officer.The $16 million emergency department, which will begin treating patients Dec. 16, will offer valet parking, private waiting rooms and a concierge, who can arrange baby-sitting or dog-walking for harried families (and who can be reached by videophone)
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2002
A super-sized emergency department at Howard County General Hospital is set to open its doors next week, marking the completion of a piece of a $33.5 million expansion that should wrap up next spring. Promoted by hospital officials as "bigger and better," the 24,000-square-foot facility is expected to have far-reaching effects on emergency medical care in the fast-growing county. "We hope that patients and families will have a better overall experience and a quicker stay in a nicer environment," said Victor A. Broccolino, president and chief executive officer of Howard County General Hospital.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
Vernon Lyon has some experience with emergency rooms. He has four kids. So when his daughter Sydni recently slipped on the stairs and hurt her foot, he thought he was in for some serious time in a hospital waiting room. But the Parkville dad went to St. Joseph Medical Center, where officials have been working to cut "door to doc" time. The community hospital in Towson is one of several in the area — and one of many across the country — working to reduce wait times for patients who come in with less-than-deadly conditions.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
Johns Hopkins Bayview campus plans to begin construction on a new $40 million emergency department annex on April 1, and some roads will be closed while work is being done. Nathan Shock Drive will be closed from Bayview Boulevard to Bioscience Drive. Maryland Transit Administration bus stops will also close at the blue awning, at the Bayview Medical Offices entrance, and on Nathan Shock Drive, by the emergency department. Bus 22 and Bus 30 will be rerouted with stops at Hopkins Bayview Circle.
SPORTS
October 12, 2013
Compelled to set the record straight, I'm writing in response to the article regarding the VA Office of the Inspector General review of the Emergency Department at the Baltimore VA Medical Center that cited lengthy wait times for patients ("Baltimore VA hospital faulted for lengthy emergency room stays," Sept. 27). Unfortunately, the reporter who wrote the article did not contact the VA Maryland Health Care System for a response about the OIG review or to fact-check his information.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Shortages of beds, doctors and nurses in the Baltimore VA Medical Center's emergency room resulted in nearly half of a sample of patients spending more than 6 hours at the facility, including one who waited more than 24 hours, according to a critical inspection report released this month. In that case, a 59-year-old woman who reported a racing and pounding heartbeat waited 24 hours, 8 minutes before being admitted to a unit where her heartbeat could be continuously monitored. In another example, a 52-year-old man with schizophrenia who expressed desires to kill himself or others waited 22 hours until he was transferred to a non-VA hospital for treatment.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 22, 2013
Five beer brands were most consumed by emergency room patients, Johns Hopkins researchers have found.  Budweiser, Steel Reserve, Colt 45, Bud Ice and Bud Light were found to have been drunk by patients at Johns Hopkins Hospital over a one-year period more than any other brands. Three of the beers are malt liquors, which typically have higher alcohol contents, according to a pilot study by researchers at the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
FEATURES
By Scott Krugman, M.D | July 24, 2013
Q  My son has never been stung by a bee, but I know that first sting is inevitable. How will I know if he has an allergic reaction, and is there anything I should have on hand to treat him? A  Most children who are stung by bees have only minor local reactions, like pain and swelling. The first bee sting is extremely unlikely to cause an allergic reaction since the child's body has not seen the venom before. The only instance in which this could happen is if your child was stung and you didn't know it. For children who are allergic to bee stings, many will have more significant localized reactions with lots of swelling and redness.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
The lack of mental health resources in the United States has contributed to a significant increase in visits to the emergency department ("How to care for mentally ill people?" Jan. 8). Psychiatric emergencies grew by 131 percent between 2000 and 2007, according to a recent study. Psychiatric patients often "board" in the hallways of emergency department for several days, waiting for inpatient psychiatric services. This contributes to overcrowding which harms everyone. Emergency physicians are dedicated to providing a medical home for any patient who can't access medical care including people with health insurance who are unable to get timely appointments with their primary care physicians.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
A bullet grazed the leg of a Baltimore County police officer Wednesday when her weapon discharged during a struggle at University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, police said Thursday. The suspect, Brian Dargan, 30, will be charged upon his release from the Towson hospital, police said. Dargan is being held on $25,000 bail for unrelated burglary charges and was taken to St. Joseph from District Court for medical treatment. Police did not know a permanent address for Dargan.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2003
Carroll County General Hospital's largest expansion project is on schedule as it reaches the halfway point of its first phase. Steel beams that form the skeleton for what will be a new emergency department, along with a makeshift lobby and relocated offices, are some of the signs that work is well under way on the $80 million project. The first phase of the expansion is in line to meet its projected October completion date, said Maurice E. Spielman, the Westminster hospital's director of facilities.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | December 1, 2009
Cumberland medical center opens, replaces two hospitals After three years of construction, Western Maryland Regional Medical Center has opened in Cumberland. The $268 million facility was designed by Hord Coplan Macht of Baltimore to replace two aging hospitals in Western Maryland. The seven-story building contains 275 beds, 18 surgical suites, an emergency department, intensive care unit, cardiovascular and pediatric units, laboratories, a pharmacy, cafe, chapel and healing garden.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2012
A Baltimore County police officer's weapon discharged as he struggled with a prisoner receiving treatment at University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson on Wednesday, police said. The officer was guarding a prisoner arrested in connection with a burglary who was receiving medical treatment in the hospital's emergency room, according to police. Police said an altercation broke out after hospital workers discovered the prisoner was hiding a needle in his clothing and the man grabbed a hospital staff member.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Most roads were cleared of snow and fallen trees in Garrett County as of late Sunday, and most federal and state emergency officials who'd responded there following superstorm Sandy's damaging blizzard had departed. Still, thousands remained without power. "The only thing that's still lacking, as far as I understand it, is power restoration, and that's a slow, tedious process because of the damage that's been done and because of the vastness of Garrett County," said Jim Raley, chairman of the county's Board of Commissioners.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.