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By Susan Reimer | February 26, 2002
"BEACH WEEK," the May migration of high school seniors to Ocean City, is a rite of passage - for both parents and children. Beach Week is when a bunch of high school kids crowd, unsupervised, into a rental unit for a week of having their parents at least two hours away. Back at home, parents wring their hands and pray that the phone does not ring with a request for bail money. The best-case scenario is that the seniors come back from the beach suffering from too much sun and too little sleep.
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By Cal Thomas | March 29, 2014
"Well, then," Jesus said, "give to Caesar what belongs to Caesar, and give to God what belongs to God. " (Mark 12:17 Living Paraphrase) When considering what belongs to Caesar and what belongs to God, what happens when the federal government seeks to replace God by defining "church" and when life begins to have value, the latter having been done in Roe vs. Wade and subsequent court rulings? While there are other issues in the Hobby Lobby case argued before the Supreme Court on Tuesday, these are the major ones.
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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 28, 2005
WASHINGTON - The government is continuing to delay a ruling on nonprescription sales of a "morning-after pill," highlighting a bitter clash over sex and reproductive rights between the White House and medical and women's groups. Under federal guidelines, the Food and Drug Administration was supposed to reach a decision last Friday on whether to make an emergency contraceptive pill available over the counter for women 16 and older. But in a highly unusual move, according to those familiar with the agency, the FDA missed its deadline and told Barr Pharmaceuticals, manufacturer of the drug known as Plan B, only that it hoped to complete its review in the "near future."
NEWS
February 20, 2014
A report released recently by the Guttmacher Institute shows a sharp decline in national abortion rates and strongly suggests it is due to increased access to birth control and fact-based sexual health information. We celebrate this news. Right now we have a unique opportunity for women and families in Maryland. Planned Parenthood of Maryland has announced an expansion of our long-acting contraception services project. Long-acting reversible contraception is a method of birth control that is either implanted in the arm, such as the Implanon, or intrauterine devices such as Paragard or Mirena.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 21, 2005
WASHINGTON - An emergency contraception drug that is awaiting a decision from the Food and Drug Administration on over-the-counter availability in the United States won approval yesterday for such nonprescription access from Canadian regulatory officials. The head of Barr Pharmaceuticals, makers of the drug called Plan B, said, "Canada now becomes the 34th country that enables women to have more timely access to emergency contraception without a prescription." Plan B, an FDA-approved back-up birth control measure that prevents pregnancy in most cases if taken up to 72 hours after unprotected sex, has been the subject of much debate and political wrangling in the United States.
NEWS
May 1, 2013
In the United States of 2013, any youngster can walk into a store and buy a bottle of aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen or some other pain reliever without showing any identification, parental consent or a doctor's order. They don't have to be 15 or 17 or even old enough to know how to make exact change if the cashier will help them out. So what's the big deal about a bottle of a common analgesic, you may ask? Well, it may be the most dangerous over-the-counter drug available. Each year, poison control centers across the nation get thousands of calls from people who have overdosed on painkillers, particularly acetaminophen, which some people deliberately take to commit suicide, as it can cause acute liver failure if consumed in sufficient quantity.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
In a close vote, the Senate defeated a bill yesterday that would have permitted pharmacists to dispense so-called "morning-after" emergency contraception without a prescription. After lengthy testimony, the 21-25 vote shocked sponsor Sharon M. Grosfeld, a Montgomery County Democrat. Two sponsors of the bill - Democrats Gloria G. Lawlah of Prince George's and Edward J. Kasemeyer of Howard County - cast dissenting votes. "I'm very disappointed," Grosfeld said. "It was a total shock. I think that maybe some senators were concerned about the right-wing movement in their district and were concerned about their own re-elections."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE NEWS | December 17, 2002
Emergency contraception, or the "morning-after pill," is playing a growing role in reducing abortions in the United States and may account for almost half of the recent decline in abortions, according to a new study by a leading reproductive health research center. The study, by researchers at the Alan Guttmacher Institute in New York, involved surveying a nationwide representative sample of more than 10,000 abortion patients in 1994 and 2000. During that period, the number of abortions fell from 1.4 million in 1994 to 1.3 million in 2000, while the use of emergency contraception increased slightly.
NEWS
March 6, 2006
Plan B pills can cut the rate of abortion When I read The Sun's article "Plan B battle shifts to the states" (Feb. 24), I was greatly concerned to see that anti-abortion groups are ignoring accepted science and medicine in their effort to deny women greater access to emergency contraception. Emergency contraception is, as its name indicates, contraception, plain and simple. It is a dose of ordinary birth control pills that works to prevent pregnancy if taken soon after unprotected sex. It is not a form of abortion, and will not work if a woman is already pregnant.
NEWS
By Cristina Page | August 21, 2007
At National Right to Life's conference this year, Mitt Romney set out to convince anti-abortion leaders he was their candidate. At the podium, he rattled off his qualifications. To a layman's ears, it sounded pretty standard for abortion politics. He wants to overturn Roe v. Wade. He supports teaching only abstinence to teens. But for those trained to hear the subtleties, Mr. Romney was acknowledging something more. He implied an opposition to the birth control pill and a willingness to join in their efforts to scale back access to contraception.
NEWS
May 2, 2013
In the United States of 2013, any youngster can walk into a store and buy a bottle of aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen or some other pain reliever without showing any identification, parental consent or a doctor's order. They don't have to be 15 or 17 or even old enough to know how to make exact change if the cashier will help them out. So what's the big deal about a bottle of a common analgesic, you may ask? Well, it may be the most dangerous over-the-counter drug available. Each year, poison control centers across the nation get thousands of calls from people who have overdosed on painkillers, particularly acetaminophen, which some people deliberately take to commit suicide, as it can cause acute liver failure if consumed in sufficient quantity.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
Last week, a federal district judge in New York ruled that girls younger than 17 should be allowed to purchase the Plan B contraceptive pill over the counter. Unlike the Obama administration, Judge Edward Korman got this one right. The 2011 decision by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius to restrict access for younger girls not only denied them a safe and legal means to prevent unwanted pregnancy but ignored all scientific evidence that supported its access. Emergency contraceptive pills, commonly known as "Plan B," are drugs that work to prevent pregnancy if taken shortly after sexual intercourse.
NEWS
By Jessica Valenti | February 28, 2012
Aspirins and short skirts and contraception, oh my! The last few weeks have seen a slew of Republican gaffes concerning women's sexuality. From Rick Santorum's billionaire supporter Foster Friess' waxing nostalgic about the good old days when women put aspirin "between their knees" in lieu of contraception to an online furor over whether the young conservative women at CPAC dressed too provocatively, the Republicans have a major woman problem on...
NEWS
By Margaret Moon | December 12, 2011
A society is at its worst when it leaves its most vulnerable citizens exposed so that its most powerful can hide from ugly realities. In the case of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius' ruling to reject the Food and Drug Administration's expert opinion regarding access to emergency contraception for adolescent girls, the ugly reality is that teenage girls engage in unprotected sexual intercourse. Unprotected from pregnancy due to lack of effective contraception, unprotected from sexually transmitted illnesses including HIV, unprotected from the aggressive sexual content of popular media and advertising, unprotected by social and family networks that ought to be looking out for them.
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,Tribune Washington Bureau | February 27, 2009
WASHINGTON -Taking another step into the abortion debate, the Obama administration will move today to rescind a controversial rule that allows health care workers to deny abortion counseling or other family planning services if doing so would violate their moral beliefs, according to administration officials. The rollback of the so-called "conscience rule" comes just two months after the Bush administration announced it late last year in one of its final policy initiatives. The new administration's action seems certain to stoke ideological battles between supporters and opponents of abortion rights over the responsibilities of doctors, nurses and other medical workers to their patients.
NEWS
By Cristina Page | August 21, 2007
At National Right to Life's conference this year, Mitt Romney set out to convince anti-abortion leaders he was their candidate. At the podium, he rattled off his qualifications. To a layman's ears, it sounded pretty standard for abortion politics. He wants to overturn Roe v. Wade. He supports teaching only abstinence to teens. But for those trained to hear the subtleties, Mr. Romney was acknowledging something more. He implied an opposition to the birth control pill and a willingness to join in their efforts to scale back access to contraception.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2003
A bill that some say would reduce the number of abortions - and that opponents argue would encourage greater promiscuity and sexually transmitted diseases among young women - narrowly passed the Maryland House of Delegates yesterday. In a 71-66 vote, the House authorized pharmacists to sell over-the-counter emergency contraception - the so-called morning-after pill - to prevent pregnancy. The bill needed a minimum of 71 votes to pass. "This bill is about abortion," said Del. John Adams Hurson, the chairman of the House Health and Governmental Operations Committee.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | August 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration announced yesterday that the Plan B morning-after pill can now be purchased without a prescription by women 18 and older. The decision ends a bitter three-year political fight, but doctors say it is not likely to change the behavior of women in the ways that conservatives and liberals had argued. Women will have to show proof of age in order to buy the emergency contraception, which will be kept behind counters in pharmacies and health clinics, but they won't need a prescription any longer.
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