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By Mary Gail Hare and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 18, 2010
Harford County has won a $750,000 federal grant to improve emergency communications. Officials said the funding, announced Thursday at the county's Emergency Operations Center, would pay for upgrades to communications used by first responders, including several hundred volunteer firefighters. They said the technology would help police, fire and emergency medical services workers to share videos, images and data securely. "This technology will allow our volunteer fire departments to communicate better with our own county agencies, like public works," said Rich Gardner, spokesman for the volunteer fire departments.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | January 31, 2013
Going back 25 years, mobile phones, as they were called in those days, were the size of small briefcases, and were prohibitively expensive and impractical for the average person. In those days, police officers communicated mainly by radio dispatch and volunteer firefighters and ambulance crews in Harford County were issued radio pagers which activated whenever a network of transmitters broadcast a signal that emergency help was needed at a particular location. Now, of course, almost everyone has at least one portable phone - we call them cell phones or just "our" phones - and they're small enough to carry just about anywhere.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
A man hiding from a burglar silently sends a text message about his emergency. A motorist quickly uploads a video of a serious car crash. A passerby's snapshot of an armed robber is quickly delivered to police on patrol. As wireless devices increasingly allow citizens to quickly capture and transmit information, Maryland officials are installing technology that could pave the way to make any of these scenarios possible. As part of a nationwide effort, the state is upgrading emergency communications to prepare dispatch centers for what's called Next Generation 911. The effort has funneled more than $50 million into system upgrades statewide, creating the backbone for systems that could be enhanced to accept text messages, images, video and audio.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
A man hiding from a burglar silently sends a text message about his emergency. A motorist quickly uploads a video of a serious car crash. A passerby's snapshot of an armed robber is quickly delivered to police on patrol. As wireless devices increasingly allow citizens to quickly capture and transmit information, Maryland officials are installing technology that could pave the way to make any of these scenarios possible. As part of a nationwide effort, the state is upgrading emergency communications to prepare dispatch centers for what's called Next Generation 911. The effort has funneled more than $50 million into system upgrades statewide, creating the backbone for systems that could be enhanced to accept text messages, images, video and audio.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2003
Five years after county officials began searching for a site to build a tower that would eliminate a gap in emergency radio communications in the northeast area of the county, the Carroll commissioners moved yesterday toward buying land for the project. The commissioners voted unanimously to sign an option for the county to buy for $125,000 a 3-acre parcel south of Lineboro, where the tower could be built as early as this summer. The county must advertise the agreement and wait 15 days for public comment before returning the proposal to the commissioners to complete the purchase, said Douglas Myers, Department of Public Works director.
NEWS
August 14, 2005
Harrison to serve as interim head of historical society Antiques and collectibles appraiser C. Robert Harrison of Uniontown has agreed to serve as interim executive director of the Historical Society of Carroll County while the organization conducts a nationwide search for a new leader. Harrison's three-month term began in late last month. During his tenure, he will continue to run his business, Harrison Appraisals LLC. He has a Master of Liberal Arts degree from the Johns Hopkins University and has studied at the Museum for Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winterthur and Williamsburg.
NEWS
November 8, 1993
POLICE* Westminster: A $700 portable radio, used by the Westminster tTC fire company for emergency communications, was stolen from one of the medic units on Monday. The two-way transceiver was last seen Oct. 31 in the ambulance at the firehouse in the first block of E. Main St. Police have no suspects in the theft.An employee of Newburg Wood Crafts in the Crossroads Square Shopping Center told police someone stole a $55 child's table from the store Thursday. There are no suspects, police said.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | July 13, 1993
Two lightning strikes in 16 days on Carroll's 911 emergency communications system have caused an undetermined amount of damage and great concern at the Emergency Operations Center, the county commissioners were told yesterday.Each of the two recent hits took the 911 system off the air for hours and destroyed or damaged equipment at the center, including power supply machinery, Teletype equipment used for the hearing-impaired, dispatch consoles and associated controls, said Thomas van de Bussche, bureau chief of the management information system.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1997
The county's 14 volunteer fire companies will switch to a radio communication system at noon today that will enable them to talk to dispatchers privately and without interference for the first time in more than 30 years.Under the old system, "all incidents had to be run at once" by the county's emergency communications office on two low-band channels, said Duane Ludwig, president of the Carroll County Fire Chiefs' Association."If someone else was talking, you had to wait your turn," he said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - A classified Bush administration report has found that the largest counterterrorism exercise conducted by the federal government since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks was marred by communications problems, serious shortages of medical supplies and hospital rooms, and confusion over where the residue of a radiological attack would spread, administration officials said yesterday. The five-day exercise in May in Chicago and Seattle, "Topoff 2," tested the response of federal agencies and local governments to nearly simultaneous terrorist attacks using biological agents and a so-called dirty bomb, a crude radiological device.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Hundreds of Perry Hall High School parents and students packed into the auditorium one week after the first day of school was marred by gunfire, demanding answers about what unfolded in the cafeteria and posing questions about student safety. From metal detectors to tighter student discipline policies and more sophisticated communication systems, dozens of parents called for action Tuesday night in the wake of the Aug. 27 shooting that left Daniel Borowy, 17, a special needs student, in critical condition.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 18, 2010
Harford County has won a $750,000 federal grant to improve emergency communications. Officials said the funding, announced Thursday at the county's Emergency Operations Center, would pay for upgrades to communications used by first responders, including several hundred volunteer firefighters. They said the technology would help police, fire and emergency medical services workers to share videos, images and data securely. "This technology will allow our volunteer fire departments to communicate better with our own county agencies, like public works," said Rich Gardner, spokesman for the volunteer fire departments.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jessica Anderson,Sun Reporter | July 11, 2008
Firefighters, police officers and other emergency workers across Maryland will be able to communicate on a uniform radio system, improving their ability to react to everything from car crashes to terrorist attacks, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced yesterday. O'Malley signed an executive order yesterday to establish a statewide communications system that will allow law enforcement and public safety personnel from different state, county and municipal agencies to use one emergency radio system.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Sumathi Reddy and Siobhan Gorman and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporters | July 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Baltimore and Maryland will receive a total of more than $32 million in U.S. homeland security grants, the federal government announced yesterday. The amount represents a major increase over last year but falls short of the nearly $40 million in 2005. Maryland can also expect to receive close to $23 million more under a special federal program for emergency communications, said Homeland Security spokesman Russ Knocke. That one-time infusion would raise the state's total above $55 million, more than double last year's federal funding and close to the peak of more than $57 million in 2004.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 8, 2007
The Carroll County Sheriff's Office has been pushing for years for a consolidated dispatch center to streamline emergency communications on one channel and under one roof. But the commander of the state police's Westminster barracks said in-house dispatchers have no problem handling 911 calls for the resident troopers and officers from the Hampstead, Manchester, Sykesville and Taneytown municipal police departments. Lt. Dean Richardson, commander of the Westminster barracks, said one integrated system would require more dispatchers and a larger county emergency call facility.
NEWS
By ELLIE BAUBLITZ and ELLIE BAUBLITZ,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
Nearly nine years ago, Carroll County installed a highly touted, advanced radio emergency communications system. But the Lineboro Volunteer Fire Department was still plagued by dead spots where communication was impossible. Now, a new 340-foot communications tower is up and running outside of Lineboro. It was officially placed in service at 3:15 p.m. March 31, said Randy Waesche Jr., the county's Emergency Communications Center coordinator. The county will hold a ribbon cutting for the tower at 1 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
County public safety officials plan to move forward with a new tower in Lineboro and will tap the expertise of state agencies to choose a site that will eliminate a gap in emergency communications. Buddy Redman, director of public safety, plans to meet next week with officials from the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services and the state Department of Management and Budget's General Services to revisit prospective sites for the tower. The agencies have surveyed sites in Carroll County and southern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
In changes designed to make Baltimore emergency response efforts safer and more efficient, city officials unveiled yesterday their new state-of-the-art emergency communications system.For the first time, 911 or 311 calls to fire and police departments, paramedics and the Department of Water and Power are being routed through one $60 million computer system and can automatically prompt response from all the agencies."This is one of the most sophisticated communications systems anywhere in the world," said Patricia A. Sturmon, a spokeswoman for Motorola, which designed the system.
NEWS
By Brad Lyman | September 7, 2005
PRESIDENT BUSH, in virtually the same breath, declared the emergency response to Hurricane Katrina "unacceptable" and praised Michael Brown, director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Once again, the discontinuity between what Americans witness on television and the words uttered by their leaders is staggering. Does Mr. Bush plan to award Mr. Brown the Medal of Freedom as he did to discredited CIA Director George J. Tenet? America is afflicted with too many face-saving politicians and too few leaders.
NEWS
August 14, 2005
Harrison to serve as interim head of historical society Antiques and collectibles appraiser C. Robert Harrison of Uniontown has agreed to serve as interim executive director of the Historical Society of Carroll County while the organization conducts a nationwide search for a new leader. Harrison's three-month term began in late last month. During his tenure, he will continue to run his business, Harrison Appraisals LLC. He has a Master of Liberal Arts degree from the Johns Hopkins University and has studied at the Museum for Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winterthur and Williamsburg.
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