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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 17, 2014
Maryland was ranked 10 th among the states for its emergency medical services, according to a new assessment by the American College of Emergency Physicians . The state got an overall ranking of a C, better than the national grade of D+. And the emergency system got top ranking for the category focused on quality and patient safety. That was largely based on protocols established by the state's unique management system, Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, for how emergency and trauma care is triaged and where patients are taken.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
A man was shot in the elbow in Northeast Baltimore on Thursday night, according to Baltimore Police. Officers responded to the 2900 block of Southern Avenue in the city's Lauraville neighborhood about 9:47 p.m. and found the injured man, police said. The man was transported to a nearby hospital for emergency care, police said. His injuries were not considered life-threatening late Thursday, police said. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call police at 410-396-2444.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As enrollment in health maintenance organizations soars, hospitals across the country report that HMOs are increasingly denying claims for care provided in hospital emergency rooms.Such denials create obstacles to emergency care for HMO patients or can leave them responsible for thousands of dollars in medical bills.The denials also frustrate emergency room doctors, who say the HMO practices discourage patients from seeking urgently needed care.For their part, HMOs -- in which 51 million people are now enrolled -- say their costs would run out of control if they allowed unlimited access to emergency rooms.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
A man entered Johns Hopkins Hospital with a gun early Tuesday morning and is believed to have fatally shot himself inside an emergency room bathroom, an incident that came days after the medical center held a national symposium on safety inside hospitals. The man, who was 69 years old, was found dead with a gunshot wound to his chest shortly after midnight, Baltimore police spokeswoman Sgt. Sarah E. Connolly confirmed. Police would not identify him or provide additional details of the shooting, saying it was under investigation.
NEWS
By ROBYN SHELTON and ROBYN SHELTON,ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 15, 2006
ORLANDO, Fla. -- The nation's emergency medical system is in crisis, with crowded ERs turning away ambulances, patients waiting hours to be treated and a shortage of on-call specialists. A three-volume report published yesterday found that the system is barely able to meet daily demands, let alone the potential onslaught of patients from a disease outbreak or terrorist attack. The Institute of Medicine, which spent two years investigating the problems, found gaping holes in the "safety net" for the critically ill and injured.
HEALTH
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2011
The Anne Arundel County Fire Department on Tuesday unveiled a 26-patient, bus-style ambulance, a vehicle for treating and transporting people in a variety of emergencies, including mass casualties, heat-related problems at large public events and evacuations of nursing homes. Depending on needs, the ambulance can hold 14 patients on stretchers or eight in wheelchairs, or 26 in its seats. Division Chief Michael E. Cox Jr. said its features include the ability to supply individually metered oxygen to 23 patients at once, as well as state-of-the-art radio capability.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
Maryland ranked 10th and earned a B-minus in a state-by-state assessment of emergency medical care released today. A panel of experts appointed by the American College of Emergency Physicians evaluated emergency medical care available in each state and the District of Columbia based on 50 criteria, such as access to hospital emergency rooms and seat-belt laws. California ranked first, earning a high B. Arkansas finished last, receiving a D. The national average was a C-minus. States were given an overall grade and a ranking based on each of four categories: emergency care, quality and patient safety, public health and injury prevention, and the medical-liability environment.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | March 15, 1994
Dr. Janet Neslen has a ready response to those who don't believe there's a health care crisis in the country.The county health officer might mention that 500,000 Marylanders don't have health insurance or that some elderly people have to choose between paying for medicine or buying food.But Dr. Neslen says one of the most striking examples of the inadequacy of the country's health care system is the health department's shrinking emergency-care fund.The fund was set up three years ago to provide medical care to uninsured Carroll residents in cases of pain or acute infection.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
A man was shot in the elbow in Northeast Baltimore on Thursday night, according to Baltimore Police. Officers responded to the 2900 block of Southern Avenue in the city's Lauraville neighborhood about 9:47 p.m. and found the injured man, police said. The man was transported to a nearby hospital for emergency care, police said. His injuries were not considered life-threatening late Thursday, police said. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call police at 410-396-2444.
NEWS
August 11, 2011
In response to the coverage of a new health care facility in Columbia ("Patient First to open Columbia medical center," Aug. 5), it should be noted that urgent care centers are not equal alternatives to emergency rooms. They are options for common medical problems when a physician's office is closed or unable to provide an appointment. The fact is, the vast majority people seeking emergency care need to be there. Only 8 percent of patients are non-urgent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and non-urgent "doesn't mean unnecessary" by the government's definition.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 17, 2014
Maryland was ranked 10 th among the states for its emergency medical services, according to a new assessment by the American College of Emergency Physicians . The state got an overall ranking of a C, better than the national grade of D+. And the emergency system got top ranking for the category focused on quality and patient safety. That was largely based on protocols established by the state's unique management system, Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, for how emergency and trauma care is triaged and where patients are taken.
HEALTH
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
As of Tuesday, thousands of residents will be able to log onto the state's health care exchange, the Maryland Health Connection, to browse for medical insurance and even buy a policy. The exchange and others like it across the country are considered key to getting the uninsured insured, which in Maryland is estimated to involve as many as 800,000 people. The Maryland exchange will feature 45 plans offered by six private carriers. "Maryland Health Connection is not government-run health insurance.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Peninsula Regional Medical Center announced Wednesday that it will lay off 58 employees and offer buyouts to 130 as the number of patients it treats declines. The employees who lose their jobs will be offered severance packages and the opportunity to apply for other jobs at the Salisbury hospital, the company said in a statement. Peninsula Regional on average has 66 fewer patients in the hospital a day than last year. The medical center is licensed for 288 beds and expects that number to decrease to 250 within the next two years.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
As the nation implements health care reform, emergency care has never been more important. We treat everyone, from babies to seniors, and we see the full spectrum of medical problems that exist. We are available at all times for all people. A new report by the RAND Corporation finds that emergency physicians are playing a role in reducing health care costs. This report urges policymakers and hospital administrators to pay closer attention to the role that emergency physicians can play in evaluating, managing and preventing hospital admissions.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
The lack of mental health resources in the United States has contributed to a significant increase in visits to the emergency department ("How to care for mentally ill people?" Jan. 8). Psychiatric emergencies grew by 131 percent between 2000 and 2007, according to a recent study. Psychiatric patients often "board" in the hallways of emergency department for several days, waiting for inpatient psychiatric services. This contributes to overcrowding which harms everyone. Emergency physicians are dedicated to providing a medical home for any patient who can't access medical care including people with health insurance who are unable to get timely appointments with their primary care physicians.
NEWS
By Patrick Whelan and Kathleen Kennedy Townsend | October 28, 2012
On the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's dramatic announcement about the presence of Soviet missiles in Cuba, the two presidential candidates met for a debate last Monday only 250 miles away in Boca Raton, Fla. Moderator Bob Schieffer began the night by reminding the nearly 60 million viewers that those 13 days in late 1962 were "perhaps the closest we've ever come to nuclear war. And it is a sobering reminder that every president faces...
HEALTH
By Reprinted from Mayo Clinic Health Letter with permission of Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. 55905. Distributed by Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 18, 1990
You're awakened in the middle of the night by severe chest pains. You notice a lump in your right breast during your morning shower. You've had a fever and a persistent cough for the last three days.If faced with one of these or other health problems, what would you do? Should you go immediately to the emergency room? Or should you just wait and see?How you perceive symptoms strongly influences whether you'll seek emergency care for problems that aren't serious -- or whether you'll delay seeking treatment for conditions that could threaten your life.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
A man entered Johns Hopkins Hospital with a gun early Tuesday morning and is believed to have fatally shot himself inside an emergency room bathroom, an incident that came days after the medical center held a national symposium on safety inside hospitals. The man, who was 69 years old, was found dead with a gunshot wound to his chest shortly after midnight, Baltimore police spokeswoman Sgt. Sarah E. Connolly confirmed. Police would not identify him or provide additional details of the shooting, saying it was under investigation.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | October 26, 2012
Linda Teixeira, of Laurel, is no stranger to emergency rooms. Her daughter is on dialysis and has other related health issues that require emergency care on a regular basis. What is new for Teixeira is that on this particular evening, she's waiting for her daughter in Laurel Regional Hospital's waiting room. "We live up the street and could walk here, but she was here a couple of times in the past and the service wasn't good, so we had been going to Howard General," Teixeira said.
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