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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
1 The woman had survived cancer but lost her job. That is what she was hoping to replace when she reached out to the Eastpoint Workforce Development Center in Essex for help. But a counselor there learned that the woman was living in her car and immediately found a shelter bed for her. Then he was able to guide her to medical and prescription assistance. Credit A Helping Hand in Hard Times, a new Web tool that is helping Baltimore County staff and job-seekers locate a wide range of emergency assistance.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2011
Help still is available for Marylanders at risk of losing their homes because they lost a job, their pay was cut or earnings reduced because of an illness. But time is running out. Homeowners facing foreclosure on their primary residence must get their applications into the state before 4 p.m. Sept. 16 to receive an interest-free, forgivable loan worth up to $50,000. The money is intended to help delinquent homeowners get current on housing payments and assist with future mortgage bills for as long as two years.
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 6, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The first phase of Maryland's welfare reform effort begins at the end of this month when the state kills off a program that once helped more than 17,000 Maryland families a year with small grants to tide them over in emergencies.State-funded Emergency Assistance, a $3.2 million program that made small amounts available for those facing eviction or other sudden problems, ends April 1. The remainder of its budget, $800,000, will revert to the general Department of Human Resources budget.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
A string of terrible luck brought Deborah Goldring to the brink of foreclosure. Her husband died. All their savings were exhausted paying down bills from his long illness. Then she lost her job. But just as the Baltimore woman's lender notified her that her time had nearly run out, a new federally funded program was launched to help homeowners like her. Now Goldring is about to close on a no-interest loan that will allow her to catch up on her mortgage and that will cover a large chunk of her monthly payments while she looks for work.
NEWS
May 1, 2005
THE QUESTION: How many calls does the 911 county emergency dispatch center in Westminster typically receive in a year? THE ANSWER: The dispatch center fielded 55,375 calls for help last year, according to the county Office of Public Safety. That's a 67 percent increase since 1994, when the center handled 33,071 calls. Last year, emergency assistance was dispatched in response to 15,104 of those calls, up from 10,728 in 1994. Send your questions of general interest to: carroll.letters@baltsun.
NEWS
September 7, 1995
FIRN/Community Assistance for International Residents has published the "Helpbook," a resource booklet to acquaint new arrivals from other countries with the services available in Howard County through local government and nonprofit agencies.The 20-page booklet shows where to find information on immigration and naturalization, translators, jobs, housing, driver's licenses, Social Security cards, transportation, English classes, aid to low-income families or the elderly and emergency assistance.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 6, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The first phase of Maryland's welfare reform effort begins at the end of this month when the state kills off a program that once helped more than 17,000 Maryland families a year with small grants to tide them over in emergencies.State-funded Emergency Assistance, a $3.2 million program that made small amounts available for those facing eviction or other sudden problems, ends April 1. The remainder of its budget, $800,000, will revert to the general Department of Human Resources budget.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | November 28, 1990
Human Services Programs Inc., the private agency that runs most of Carroll's shelters and emergency assistance, won approval from the County Commissioners yesterday to become a "community action agency."That designation was started by former President Lyndon B. Johnson in the 1960s during his "War on Poverty."Community action agencies formed in other parts of the state and country in the 1960s, but never in Carroll. Human Services needed the commissioners' OK and now awaits state approval.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation announced this week that it will award $10 million over five years for emergency services for impoverished Holocaust survivors living in North America. The Weinberg Holocaust Survivors Emergency Assistance Fund provides medical equipment and medications, dental care, transportation, food and short-term home care for Holocaust survivors. The money from the Baltimore-based foundation will be managed by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, based in New York.
NEWS
May 13, 2009
The waiting lines for food and medical assistance, always long at state Department of Human Resources offices, have grown even longer during this economic downturn as a surge in applicants has stretched caseworkers to the limit and left many people without benefits, simply because there aren't enough staff workers to process their claims. Baltimore Sun reporter Julie Bykowicz's poignant story Tuesday about Miracyle Thompson, a pregnant mother who was forced to skip meals so that her children could eat, represents a dilemma faced by thousands of Maryland residents who have waited longer than the 30 days allowed by federal law for emergency assistance approval.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation announced this week that it will award $10 million over five years for emergency services for impoverished Holocaust survivors living in North America. The Weinberg Holocaust Survivors Emergency Assistance Fund provides medical equipment and medications, dental care, transportation, food and short-term home care for Holocaust survivors. The money from the Baltimore-based foundation will be managed by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, based in New York.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
1 The woman had survived cancer but lost her job. That is what she was hoping to replace when she reached out to the Eastpoint Workforce Development Center in Essex for help. But a counselor there learned that the woman was living in her car and immediately found a shelter bed for her. Then he was able to guide her to medical and prescription assistance. Credit A Helping Hand in Hard Times, a new Web tool that is helping Baltimore County staff and job-seekers locate a wide range of emergency assistance.
NEWS
May 13, 2009
The waiting lines for food and medical assistance, always long at state Department of Human Resources offices, have grown even longer during this economic downturn as a surge in applicants has stretched caseworkers to the limit and left many people without benefits, simply because there aren't enough staff workers to process their claims. Baltimore Sun reporter Julie Bykowicz's poignant story Tuesday about Miracyle Thompson, a pregnant mother who was forced to skip meals so that her children could eat, represents a dilemma faced by thousands of Maryland residents who have waited longer than the 30 days allowed by federal law for emergency assistance approval.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun reporter | January 27, 2008
College Park -- In the aftermath of Maryland's embarrassing home losses to Ohio University and American last month, forward James Gist seemed to be taking much of the criticism for his lack of production, effort and leadership. Gist fouled out of both games, playing a total of 47 minutes, contributing 11 points and 10 rebounds. The only fourth-year senior on the team, Gist was seeing his final season as a Terrapin quickly slipping away. Duke@Maryland Tonight, 6:30, Comcast SportsNet, 1300 AM, 105.7 FM Records: No. 4 Duke (16-1, 4-0 ACC)
NEWS
November 21, 2007
In this season of bounty, there are troubling reminders of hunger in our midst that should not be acceptable. Two reports last week found that the number of hungry Americans, including children, remains about the same, which is way too many people. And things aren't likely to get better as food, energy and housing costs are increasing while salaries remain the same or decline. Reducing hunger requires more aggressive public and private action. The federal Department of Agriculture reported that in 2006, there was a slight increase in "food insecure" households, up from 12.59 million in 2005 to 12.65 million in 2006, or nearly 11 percent of all households.
NEWS
July 28, 2006
In the chaotic aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the Bush administration was so eager to compensate for initial bungling that imperiled thousands of Gulf Coast residents, it began passing out cash aid to victims almost indiscriminately. So many people took advantage of this invitation to fraud that federal investigators estimate that 16 percent of the emergency assistance money - about $1 billion - was misspent on bogus victims and duplicate payments, with uses of the funds including football season tickets, divorce lawyers, and - most famously - a sex-change operation.
NEWS
May 28, 1993
By pledging $20,000 in funds to the Human Services Program, the Carroll County commissioners have ensured that two shelters for homeless families in Westminster will remain open. Without that 11th hour-contribution, HSP might have been forced to close its family shelters. The commissioners realized the gravity of the situation, found the money in their 1994 budget and solved the problem -- at least until next year.We commend the commissioners -- along with groups and private individuals who have made recent donations -- for their responsiveness.
NEWS
March 24, 1993
By refusing to sign a letter to President Clinton requestin federal assistance to pay for snow removal after the recent blizzard, Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett adhered to his political ideology to reduce federal spending. However in his zeal, Mr. Bartlett may not have been thinking of the best interests of his constituents.Mr. Bartlett, along with Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, his GOP colleague from the Eastern Shore who also refused to sign the letter, believe that the federal government's emergency assistance programs fall into that category.
NEWS
May 1, 2005
THE QUESTION: How many calls does the 911 county emergency dispatch center in Westminster typically receive in a year? THE ANSWER: The dispatch center fielded 55,375 calls for help last year, according to the county Office of Public Safety. That's a 67 percent increase since 1994, when the center handled 33,071 calls. Last year, emergency assistance was dispatched in response to 15,104 of those calls, up from 10,728 in 1994. Send your questions of general interest to: carroll.letters@baltsun.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2004
Carroll County will pick up the tab for the next five months for a cash-strapped state program that provides emergency assistance to poor and disabled adults. The commissioners approved spending $50,000 yesterday to cover no more than 18 new applicants each month through June. "This is a safety net we're throwing out," Commissioner Dean L. Minnich said. The state instituted a six-month freeze last month on applications for the Transitional Emergency Medical and Housing Assistance program, which provides $185 a month to disabled people.
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