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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 17, 1993
The snow was piling up Saturday morning and the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick were not about to kiss their 38th annual luncheon goodbye.Some 200 of these fellows resisted the blizzard and drove downtown for the get-together, a green-letter day on the local Celtic social calendar. Had the weather been better, 900 Irishmen and friendly pretenders would have been wearing the green at the luncheon.Baltimore possesses a number of groups whose membership tends to be strictly all-male and who revere the memory of the Emerald Isle.
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SPORTS
By Patrick Maynard | April 15, 2013
BOSTON -- When Kieran O'Leary took the trip to last year's Boston Marathon, the County Dublin resident met up with several other Irish visitors before the race. "Some of the guys I knew from before from other races -- I'd met a few of them previously," O'Leary said by phone last week. "We met up on race day and traveled out to the start together and then hung around together, waiting for the start. " There were plans to meet up afterward as well. No post-race reunion happened however, because O'Leary found himself in a medical tent, receiving an I.V. drip -- a recovery from one of the hotter Boston Marathons in history.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2003
Chances are that the term "Irish culture" conjures up the immortal words of poets and playwrights before it suggests anything else. That is hardly surprising, given the Irish flair for language and the extraordinary roster of wordsmiths who have graced the Emerald Isle with their literary presence. But if evocative words have enjoyed pride of place in the Irish soul, music has not been far behind. That is the rationale behind "From Ireland, on Wings of Song," the season-ending concert Saturday evening by Columbia Pro Cantare, Howard County's premiere ensemble for vocal music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore and hh | October 8, 2012
"He went to the cellar, to draw a little beer; And quickly did return, to say there was none there. " -- "Blue Bell Boy," traditional nursery rhyme "Blue Bell Boy" is a stripped-down, brilliant episode of "Boardwalk Empire. " Outside of Nucky's immediate world, things move along incrementally, but ultimately the meat of the episode is a spectacular one-act play featuring three great performances. It's a big episode for Owen Sleater, who is experiencing that familiar headache of being in the boss' doghouse.
TRAVEL
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2000
It's your first day in Ireland. The weather is bracing, the Emerald Isle's scenery is even greener than you expected, and you've negotiated the winding drive from Shannon Airport to Galway, the 760-year-old town known as City of the Tribes. There's an edge of excitement - you've never driven on the opposite side of the road, and it's awkward shifting with your left hand - but you've found a groove, plunged safely into a dozen busy roundabouts and made it to your Tudor-style bed and breakfast safe and sound.
NEWS
October 5, 1992
ROSS PEROT'S off-again, on-again presidential campaign reminds some old-timers around here of the lyrical refrain from a poem by Strickland Gillilan, The Evening Sun's very first editorial page columnist:Off agin, on agin,Gone agin. -- FinniginThese closing lines are more memorable than the poem itself, which was written in what can only be described as a heavy Irish dialect. Entitled "Finnigin to Flannigan," the poem recounts the story of Finnigin, a railroad section chief whose more-educated boss, Flannigan, had berated him for writing overly wordy reports.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Sad news for Baltimore's Irish community: Joe Patrick Byrne, who for decades ran J. Patrick's Irish Pub in Locust Point, passed away last Saturday of cancer. The future of the pub is uncertain. Byrne, who lived above the bar, made J. Patrick's one of Baltimore's most authentic Irish pubs. Every week, musicians came to practice, jam and perform traditional Irish music there. While the pub doesn't look like much from the outside (you might drive past it a few times if you don't know exactly where to look)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore and hh | October 8, 2012
"He went to the cellar, to draw a little beer; And quickly did return, to say there was none there. " -- "Blue Bell Boy," traditional nursery rhyme "Blue Bell Boy" is a stripped-down, brilliant episode of "Boardwalk Empire. " Outside of Nucky's immediate world, things move along incrementally, but ultimately the meat of the episode is a spectacular one-act play featuring three great performances. It's a big episode for Owen Sleater, who is experiencing that familiar headache of being in the boss' doghouse.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | February 18, 2002
DUBLIN - I inserted my Allfirst bank card in the machine at Allied Irish Banks PLC headquarters, and held my breath. Having an automated teller machine eat your bank card is a hassle, so having one eat your card 3,000 miles from home must be doubly so, I assumed. But I had to try it: How much of a network were we really? Ireland's largest bank owns mine? Maybe I recalled that in the recesses of my mind, but frankly, how many Allfirst customers realized their bank's owner is across the Atlantic?
FEATURES
By Candyce H. Stapen and Candyce H. Stapen,Contributing Writer | March 14, 1993
What could be more Irish than a pint of Guinness, more country than lamb and kidney pie and more local than a neighborhood pub? On your next trip to the Emerald Isle, chart a tour of the cities and the countryside that has you stopping between sightseeing for lunch and dinner at local pubs.Not only will you literally rub elbows with the neighbors, but you'll taste good fare from stout to stew. As you soak up the ambience, which varies from workaday to upscale, you'll save money as well, since such traditional dishes as beef curry, Irish stew and thick potato soup are often one-half to one-third the price of similar meals in restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Sad news for Baltimore's Irish community: Joe Patrick Byrne, who for decades ran J. Patrick's Irish Pub in Locust Point, passed away last Saturday of cancer. The future of the pub is uncertain. Byrne, who lived above the bar, made J. Patrick's one of Baltimore's most authentic Irish pubs. Every week, musicians came to practice, jam and perform traditional Irish music there. While the pub doesn't look like much from the outside (you might drive past it a few times if you don't know exactly where to look)
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
The exploration and discovery of new and exotic sensory realms inspires chef John Shields' zest for cooking. The owner of Gertrude's Restaurant at the Baltimore Museum of Art uses travel to foreign shores to nourish that quest. Often called "The Culinary Ambassador of the Chesapeake Bay," Shields hosts the PBS television series "Coastal Cooking With John Shields" and has written three popular cookbooks on bay cuisine. To say Shields is busy is an understatement, so when he has time to get away, simplicity is key. He finds that and more, in his ancestral home of Ireland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2011
The bar at 1439 S. Charles St. has gone by different names over the past couple of years. Until 2008, it was the Fort Charles Pub. Then, it was Taps. When they started renovating it in November, its new owners were going to call it Catherine's Pub. But a month later, they switched permanently to Delia Foley's. What kind of bar is it? What else could it be but an Irish pub? As a concept bar, it works. From its name to its decor, it plays the Irish pub role so well it practically belongs in a Jim Sheridan movie.
NEWS
By Christianna McCausland and Christianna McCausland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 17, 2004
At Killarney House restaurant in Davidsonville, a duo of Irish musicians plays while families, couples and friends dine on chicken breast stuffed with Irish blue cheese, oatmeal-encrusted trout and steak flamed in Jameson whiskey. "Our emphasis is on the food," says Michael Galway, who owns Killarney House and another restaurant, Galway Bay, in Annapolis. He came to the United States from County Kilkenny, Ireland, in 1986 and began his career as a dishwasher at the Powerscourt restaurant in Washington.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2003
Chances are that the term "Irish culture" conjures up the immortal words of poets and playwrights before it suggests anything else. That is hardly surprising, given the Irish flair for language and the extraordinary roster of wordsmiths who have graced the Emerald Isle with their literary presence. But if evocative words have enjoyed pride of place in the Irish soul, music has not been far behind. That is the rationale behind "From Ireland, on Wings of Song," the season-ending concert Saturday evening by Columbia Pro Cantare, Howard County's premiere ensemble for vocal music.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | February 18, 2002
DUBLIN - I inserted my Allfirst bank card in the machine at Allied Irish Banks PLC headquarters, and held my breath. Having an automated teller machine eat your bank card is a hassle, so having one eat your card 3,000 miles from home must be doubly so, I assumed. But I had to try it: How much of a network were we really? Ireland's largest bank owns mine? Maybe I recalled that in the recesses of my mind, but frankly, how many Allfirst customers realized their bank's owner is across the Atlantic?
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | March 16, 1993
T. J. Lanaghan will play Irish music and there will be a reading of Irish poetry from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Cover To Cover Bookstore Cafe in the Owen Brown Shopping Center.Chef Glenn will also offer a special Irish menu and Irish coffee during cafe hours. Information: 381-9200.... If the outdoors is more to your liking for the 17th, join the Mountain Club of Maryland for a seven-mile hike at Liberty Reservoir or an easy stroll at Gunpowder Falls.Guests of all ages are welcome to join MCM members for either activity.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 16, 1996
It used to be that the phrase "Irish music" was understood by most Americans to mean one thing: folk music. Whether it was rollicking rebel songs sung by the Clancy Brothers or a spirited reel uncorked by a local ceili band, those traditional tunes were all anybody ever heard from Irish musicians particularly on St. Patrick's Day.Now, that's not at all the case. Thanks to the worldwide success of bands such as U2, the Cranberries and Hothouse Flowers, rock and roll has become Ireland's best-known sound.
TRAVEL
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2000
It's your first day in Ireland. The weather is bracing, the Emerald Isle's scenery is even greener than you expected, and you've negotiated the winding drive from Shannon Airport to Galway, the 760-year-old town known as City of the Tribes. There's an edge of excitement - you've never driven on the opposite side of the road, and it's awkward shifting with your left hand - but you've found a groove, plunged safely into a dozen busy roundabouts and made it to your Tudor-style bed and breakfast safe and sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff | March 16, 2000
'Tis a day to be green, but not with envy, for all are invited to celebrate St. Patrick's Day. 'Tis time for all lads and lassies to join the festivities, no matter if ye be Irish or not. Sure, it would be great to celebrate the day in Ireland, but for most of us that is not a likely scenario. So don your green apparel tomorrow, grab your shamrocks and hoist a brew at one or more of the numerous celebrations in the area. You can choose from among the many Irish pubs planning major celebrations for their biggest day of the year.
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