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Emerald Ash Borer

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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Just weeks after it turned up in Howard County, the emerald ash borer has been detected in Anne Arundel and Allegany counties. Maryland agriculture officials have responded by placing all Maryland counties west of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay under quarantine. Movement of ash wood and trees, and all hardwood firewood, out of the zone is banned, and all movement of hardwood firewood within the zone is discouraged. "Buy it where you burn it," officials urged. The quarantine is "the best way to secure Maryland's Eastern Shore, where EAB has not been found to date, and protect our riparian forest buffer plantings," said state Agriculture Secretary Buddy Hance.
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NEWS
August 29, 2014
Doing something about the imminent slaughter of the city's ash trees as a result of arrival of the emerald ash borer in Baltimore should be a rallying cry for citizens to get educated about trees ( "Enemy at the gates," Aug. 26). Through understanding comes action, and what this town needs is more TreeKeepers. Free city-wide TreeKeepers classes are offered this September and I urge everyone to become educated about ash trees, the insects that threaten them and how trees really do function as the lungs of our city.
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NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | September 14, 2008
The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed the spread of a voracious ash tree-killing beetle to a wooded region of northern Charles County. Previously, the pest, commonly called the emerald ash borer, had been limited to a site south of Andrews Air Force Base in Prince George's County. In recent years, the beetle has been blamed for the destruction of 25 million ash trees, including about 25,000 in Maryland. The latest detection is in a wooded area of Charles County just over the border from Prince George's.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
A voracious Asian beetle that's killed millions of ash trees across North America has finally been spotted in Baltimore, posing a costly and difficult challenge for a city that stands to lose more than 200,000 of its most common trees to the exotic pest's onslaught. It could denude blocks lined with ash and cost the city millions of dollars to remove dead or dying trees from public lands, while homeowners may be forced to pay hundreds or even thousands to treat or replace their vulnerable trees.
FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to The Sun | October 14, 2006
We're going camping and want to take our firewood with us. We live in the part of Maryland quarantined to prevent spread of the emerald ash borer insect. As I understand the regulations, we can transport wood depending on air temperatures, correct? No! Firewood is the most common way this pest is spreading in the United States. The emerald ash borer is a serious threat. No hardwood, nursery stock, green lumber, woody material, living or dead - including stumps and roots - or even uncomposted ash chips can be moved from the quarantined area.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2003
An exotic beetle from Asia that attacks ash trees has been discovered in a Prince George's County nursery, making Maryland the third state where the deadly, invasive insect has turned up. Most of the batch of 121 infected trees, which came from a Michigan nursery, was destroyed. State officials kept one to study, and they plan to survey the areas near the 27 trees that were sold and planted to see if the bug, known as the emerald ash borer, has spread, said William F. Gimpel, chief of the Maryland Department of Agriculture's plant protection and weed management section.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 5, 2009
An alert cargo inspector for U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the port of Baltimore has nabbed a dangerous stowaway hiding in a cargo container shipped from China. The illegal alien was a long-horned beetle called Stenhomalus, which has been intercepted only once before in a U.S. port and is not yet known to be loose in North America. But Stenhomalus belongs to a family of highly destructive wood-boring beetles whose members have escaped from foreign cargos and are now defying federal quarantines in New York, New Jersey, Illinois and other states.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | March 30, 2008
The Maryland Department of Agriculture is opening a new front in its war against a voracious beetle blamed for the destruction of 25 million ash trees, including about 25,000 in Maryland. In the next few weeks, the state will begin hanging insect traps along roadsides in Western Maryland to attack the emerald ash borer. The tiny insect feeds on ash trees, the most common landscaping trees in the nation. They are one of the more common trees in Western Maryland forests. The trees are popular with landscape architects, and there are nearly 300,000 planted in Baltimore and about 6 million in the metropolitan area.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Doing something about the imminent slaughter of the city's ash trees as a result of arrival of the emerald ash borer in Baltimore should be a rallying cry for citizens to get educated about trees ( "Enemy at the gates," Aug. 26). Through understanding comes action, and what this town needs is more TreeKeepers. Free city-wide TreeKeepers classes are offered this September and I urge everyone to become educated about ash trees, the insects that threaten them and how trees really do function as the lungs of our city.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2010
Agricultural specialists with the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol say they have intercepted a new foreign insect pest hiding in imported cargo at the Port of Baltimore. The discovery of Stenopterapion tenue in a shipment of Italian tiles was a first for Baltimore, but it marked the 10 t h time since 2005 the bug has been discovered in cargo shipped to U.S. ports. A wood-boring weevil found in Europe, S. tenue was discovered Dec. 6. It was identified by a U.S. Department of Agriculture entomologist last week.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
I found a shiny green bug in my yard, and I'm afraid it is the emerald ash borer that is killing ash trees in Maryland. What should I do about my ash tree? The emerald ash borer beetle is rarely seen. It's about 1/2-inch long with a tapering silhouette. Recently, many people are confusing them with green tiger beetles. This voracious predator of other insects is 1/2- to 3/4-inch long, with an abdomen wider than the head and thorax and six white spots on the abdomen - a good guy in your landscape, though its powerful jaws can nip. For guidance on identifying emerald ash borers and symptoms, observing the quarantine on ash wood, and deciding on treatment of a valuable ash tree, go to extension.umd.edu/hgic/invasives/emerald-ash-borer . I'd been watering my new dogwood for 45 minutes a day like I was told to do, but I forgot the hose one day and watered for 50 minutes.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Just weeks after it turned up in Howard County, the emerald ash borer has been detected in Anne Arundel and Allegany counties. Maryland agriculture officials have responded by placing all Maryland counties west of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay under quarantine. Movement of ash wood and trees, and all hardwood firewood, out of the zone is banned, and all movement of hardwood firewood within the zone is discouraged. "Buy it where you burn it," officials urged. The quarantine is "the best way to secure Maryland's Eastern Shore, where EAB has not been found to date, and protect our riparian forest buffer plantings," said state Agriculture Secretary Buddy Hance.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2010
Agricultural specialists with the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol say they have intercepted a new foreign insect pest hiding in imported cargo at the Port of Baltimore. The discovery of Stenopterapion tenue in a shipment of Italian tiles was a first for Baltimore, but it marked the 10 t h time since 2005 the bug has been discovered in cargo shipped to U.S. ports. A wood-boring weevil found in Europe, S. tenue was discovered Dec. 6. It was identified by a U.S. Department of Agriculture entomologist last week.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 5, 2009
An alert cargo inspector for U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the port of Baltimore has nabbed a dangerous stowaway hiding in a cargo container shipped from China. The illegal alien was a long-horned beetle called Stenhomalus, which has been intercepted only once before in a U.S. port and is not yet known to be loose in North America. But Stenhomalus belongs to a family of highly destructive wood-boring beetles whose members have escaped from foreign cargos and are now defying federal quarantines in New York, New Jersey, Illinois and other states.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | September 14, 2008
The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed the spread of a voracious ash tree-killing beetle to a wooded region of northern Charles County. Previously, the pest, commonly called the emerald ash borer, had been limited to a site south of Andrews Air Force Base in Prince George's County. In recent years, the beetle has been blamed for the destruction of 25 million ash trees, including about 25,000 in Maryland. The latest detection is in a wooded area of Charles County just over the border from Prince George's.
NEWS
By ted shelsby | August 27, 2006
The emerald ash borer, a small beetle from Asia that is blamed for the destruction of 20 million trees in Michigan, has made its way to Maryland. Testing by the state Department of Agriculture last week detected beetle-infested ash trees in Prince George's County between Clinton and Brandywine. The state imposed a quarantine that prohibits moving ash trees, logs, fallen banches, stumps or roots in or out of Prince George's County until further notice. The quarantine also bans transporting of ash firewood or any hardwood firewood - including oak, maple and cherry - in or out of the county.
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