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Embryonic Stem Cell

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By Edwin F. O'Brien | September 23, 2009
This week, the gaze of the international medical research community is fixed on Baltimore, as leading scientists have gathered here for the World Stem Cell Summit. This is both an opportunity to showcase the great talent found in Maryland's research institutions and also an occasion to invite some of the world's greatest minds to re-commit themselves to research that is ethically sound. I offer this appeal in the hope that the research being conducted and which will be discussed in Baltimore this week will uncover new avenues to relieve human suffering and advance life.
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NEWS
By Edwin F. O'Brien | September 23, 2009
This week, the gaze of the international medical research community is fixed on Baltimore, as leading scientists have gathered here for the World Stem Cell Summit. This is both an opportunity to showcase the great talent found in Maryland's research institutions and also an occasion to invite some of the world's greatest minds to re-commit themselves to research that is ethically sound. I offer this appeal in the hope that the research being conducted and which will be discussed in Baltimore this week will uncover new avenues to relieve human suffering and advance life.
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NEWS
March 10, 2009
President Barack Obama's decision to lift the ban on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research affords U.S. scientists a chance to expand this potentially ground-breaking, disease-curing work and make up ground lost to researchers elsewhere whose hands weren't similarly tied. A memo also signed by the president yesterday would return science to its rightful place in government policymaking - above politics. The stem cell decision has been anxiously awaited by American researchers who have been limited in their work on embryonic stem cells since 2001, when President Bush restricted the use of federal funds to research involving a relatively small number of existing embryonic stem cell lines.
NEWS
By Bernard Siegel | September 20, 2009
During the George W. Bush years, stem cell advocates fought an uphill battle to expand funding opportunities and engage the National Institutes of Health in this potentially lifesaving research. The political climate improved drastically with the election of President Barack Obama, who lifted the Bush-era restrictions by executive order and freed the NIH do its job in providing comprehensive guidelines for human embryonic stem cell research. In the long run, these actions will add much-needed funding for this basic research.
NEWS
By Aaron Zitner and Aaron Zitner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 2002
WASHINGTON - Following California's lead, lawmakers in at least three other states will take up proposals next year to encourage research on stem cells taken from human embryos. The measures would also permit scientists to use cloning to produce human embryos for stem cell experiments. The legislation is a challenge to President Bush, who favors a federal ban on cloning and has set rules that limit embryonic stem cell research. Congress is expected to revisit a proposal next year to outlaw human cloning for any purpose.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
Chris Foster, a top science adviser to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., retracted yesterday a statement he made a day earlier that $20 million in state money proposed by the governor for stem cell research should be targeted for nonembryonic projects. "Governor Ehrlich has directed that all proposals for the usage of the dedicated funds, including proposals for embryonic stem cell research, receive an exhaustive and science-based evaluation by the Maryland Technology Development Corp., or TEDCO," Foster, deputy secretary of the state Department of Business and Economic Development, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | November 3, 2006
U.S. Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin's Senate campaign fired off a tersely worded letter to rival Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele yesterday, demanding an end to "offensive push-poll" phone calls from a conservative group that equates Cardin's support for embryonic stem cell research to "medical experiments on unborn babies." "While it's true that you and I have a fundamental difference on embryonic stem cell research, this sort of gutter politics must stop now," Cardin said in the letter. Steele, who is challenging Cardin in the Senate race, is opposed to embryonic stem cell research.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
The recent passage of the Maryland Stem Cell Act of 2006 represented the rare convergence of good public policy with good politics. The outcome reflects well on both the General Assembly's Democratic majority and Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who has indicated he will sign the bill. There was even a measure of compromise involved, a rarity in Annapolis. But such election-year machinations are trivial compared with the measure's larger significance: Maryland is set to become a full-fledged investor in the burgeoning field of embryonic stem cell research.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - In a break with President Bush, Senate Republican leader Bill Frist has decided to support a bill to expand federal financing for embryonic stem cell research - a move that could push it closer to passage and force a confrontation with the White House, which is threatening to veto the measure. Frist, a heart-lung transplant surgeon who said last month that he did not support expanding financing "at this juncture," is expected to announce his decision this morning in a Senate speech.
NEWS
October 26, 2006
To give Rush Limbaugh his due, campaign ads for Benjamin L. Cardin and other supporters of embryonic stem cell research starring Michael J. Fox swaying and shaking from the effects of Parkinson's disease are so disturbing as to inspire disbelief. The Back to the Future star is still all-American-boy appealing, and the impulse is to reject the notion of such deterioration. Further, Mr. Limbaugh amended his initial charge that the actor was either faking his symptoms or manipulating his medication for dramatic effect.
NEWS
July 8, 2009
In one of his first acts in office, President Barack Obama directed the National Institutes of Health to issue new ethical guidelines lifting the extreme restrictions on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research imposed by the Bush administration in 2001. Those new rules, published Monday, aim to greatly expand the number of human embryonic stem cell lines available to researchers while ensuring that such cells are derived according to strict ethical standards. The new stem cell lines will have to be derived from leftover embryos created for in vitro fertilization, and donors will have to give full, informed consent for them to be used.
NEWS
March 15, 2009
Science supports humanity of fetus President Barack Obama's comments about lifting the ban on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research, and the support he is receiving from Democrats and Republicans alike on this issue, are disgustingly disingenuous ("Obama to lift stem cell research restrictions," March 7). It seems that stem cell supporters are ignoring or dancing around scientific facts about the early stages of life even as Mr. Obama claims to support "scientific facts." The real scientific facts demonstrate that the embryo is a human being who should be treated with respect and dignity from the point of its creation, not be used as a commodity.
NEWS
March 10, 2009
President Barack Obama's decision to lift the ban on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research affords U.S. scientists a chance to expand this potentially ground-breaking, disease-curing work and make up ground lost to researchers elsewhere whose hands weren't similarly tied. A memo also signed by the president yesterday would return science to its rightful place in government policymaking - above politics. The stem cell decision has been anxiously awaited by American researchers who have been limited in their work on embryonic stem cells since 2001, when President Bush restricted the use of federal funds to research involving a relatively small number of existing embryonic stem cell lines.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | July 16, 2007
ATLANTA -- A veteran of combat and police sieges, Dr. Richard H. Carmona thought he knew a dangerous assignment when he saw it. But he didn't know what he was getting into when he signed up to be U.S. surgeon general in the administration of George W. Bush. He entered an unfamiliar, high-risk environment sprinkled with snipers and pockmarked by (political) land mines. As the nation's top doc from 2002 to 2006, Dr. Carmona was ordered not to discuss embryonic stem cell research or the emergency contraceptive known as Plan B, he said last week in testimony before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.
NEWS
June 25, 2007
Pro-life president is just a hypocrite On Wednesday, President Bush vetoed legislation that would have expanded federal funding for embryonic stem cell research ("Stem cell veto spurs Md. alarm," June 21). He stated that allowing this bill to become law would "compel American taxpayers - for the first time in our history - to support the deliberate destruction of human embryos." Thus Mr. Bush cloaks himself in the words and mantle of a pro-life person. But his actions speak louder than his words.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | June 21, 2007
President Bush vetoed legislation to expand federal funding for embryonic stem cell research yesterday, prompting officials at Maryland research institutions to issue warnings that restrictions on the science are slowing medical progress. Some scientists in Maryland have patched together state grants and private donations to keep embryonic stem cell work going, but others have shied away for lack of federal support, officials said. That has blunted Maryland's competitive edge in medical research, they said, and in the long run could prevent scientists from turning their theories into treatments for disease.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jonathan Bor and Jennifer Skalka and Jonathan Bor,Sun Reporters | October 28, 2006
In the latest sign that political ads starring actor Michael J. Fox could be aiding Democrat Benjamin L. Cardin and other proponents of embryonic stem cell research, Republican Senate nominee Michael S. Steele countered yesterday with a spot in which his sister asserts that Steele supports the potentially groundbreaking science. She also reveals that she has multiple sclerosis. "Congressman Ben Cardin is attacking Michael Steele with deceptive, tasteless ads," says Monica Turner, a pediatrician and the ex-wife of the boxer Mike Tyson.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Despite strong dissent from one of his own appointees, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. launched the state commission yesterday that will likely pour millions of dollars into the ethically charged field of embryonic stem cell research. Ehrlich acknowledged the debate over the use of embryos in biomedical research but said "science will dominate" the panel's decisions about which projects will receive money. The governor spoke during a news conference at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he named the last four members of the 15-member panel, which will direct spending of $15 million in state funds this year.
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