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By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | July 28, 2006
The newly formed Maryland Stem Cell Research Commission, which will allocate state funds for public and private projects, held its first meeting yesterday and agreed to stay away from political debate on the merits of embryonic versus adult stem cells. Thirteen of the 15 members - two were absent - found another point on which most could agree: Their $15 million state-provided fund is relatively modest. "We have a chunk of change. It may not be a lot, but it's better than nothing," said Dr. Jeremy Sugarman, a professor at Johns Hopkins' Phoebe R. Berman Bioethics Institute.
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NEWS
By Edwin F. O'Brien | September 23, 2009
This week, the gaze of the international medical research community is fixed on Baltimore, as leading scientists have gathered here for the World Stem Cell Summit. This is both an opportunity to showcase the great talent found in Maryland's research institutions and also an occasion to invite some of the world's greatest minds to re-commit themselves to research that is ethically sound. I offer this appeal in the hope that the research being conducted and which will be discussed in Baltimore this week will uncover new avenues to relieve human suffering and advance life.
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NEWS
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,Los Angeles Times | June 7, 2007
Scientists have succeeded in reprogramming ordinary cells from the tips of mouse tails and rewinding their developmental clocks so they are virtually indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells, according to studies published today. If the discovery applies to human cells - and researchers are optimistic that it will - it would offer a straightforward method for creating a limitless supply of cell lines tailor-made for patients without ethical strings attached. Three research groups said they accomplished their feat by activating four genes that are turned on in days-old embryos.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | March 11, 2009
WASHINGTON - As he lifted the ban on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research Monday, President Barack Obama proclaimed that scientific decisions now will be made "on facts, not ideology." This sounds good, but what if there were other nonideological facts that Mr. Obama seems to be ignoring? One fact is that since Mr. Obama began running for president, researchers have made some rather amazing strides in alternative stem cell research. Mr. Obama has missed an opportunity to prove that he is pro-science but also sensitive to the concerns of taxpayers who don't want to pay for research that requires embryo destruction.
NEWS
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2007
Researchers have found stem cells in human amniotic fluid that appear to have many of the key benefits of embryonic stem cells while avoiding their knottiest ethical, medical and logistical drawbacks, according to a study published yesterday. The stem cells - easy to harvest from the fluid left over from amniocentesis tests given to pregnant women - were able to transform into new bone, heart muscle, blood vessels, fat, nerve and liver tissues, the study said. "So far, we've been successful with every cell type we've attempted to produce from these stem cells," said Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., and senior author of the report published online by the journal Nature Biotechnology.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | March 11, 2009
WASHINGTON - As he lifted the ban on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research Monday, President Barack Obama proclaimed that scientific decisions now will be made "on facts, not ideology." This sounds good, but what if there were other nonideological facts that Mr. Obama seems to be ignoring? One fact is that since Mr. Obama began running for president, researchers have made some rather amazing strides in alternative stem cell research. Mr. Obama has missed an opportunity to prove that he is pro-science but also sensitive to the concerns of taxpayers who don't want to pay for research that requires embryo destruction.
NEWS
July 26, 2006
Issues before Congress last week Embryonic Research Senators voted, 63-37, to send President Bush a bill (HR 810) extending U.S. support of embryonic stemcell research beyond limits he set in 2001. A yes vote was to pass a bill allowing scientists to utilize thousands of embryos that fertility clinics plan to discard. Voting Rights Senators voted, 98-0, to renew the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which bans discrimination at the polls, mandates multilingual voting materials and requires some jurisdictions to get federal approval of voting changes.
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Cells that develop into the liver can also give rise to part of the pancreas, according to researchers at the Fox Chase Cancer Center here. The finding counters the assumption that during the early stages of mammalian development, the liver and pancreas cells develop from separate lineages. Kenneth S. Zaret and his research team had originally been studying the development of the liver in mouse embryos and then discovered that the ventral part of the pancreas develops at the same time as the liver and from the same type of endoderm cells.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 20, 2005
WHAT WAS THE General Assembly's biggest anti-business goof this year? Was it the Wal-Mart tax, which would effectively require the giant retailer to devote more dollars to employee medicine or pay a penalty to Comptroller William Donald Schaefer? Was it the minimum-wage bill, which would raise the floor for Maryland pay to $6.15 an hour, $1 more than the federal standard? The defeat of liability-lawsuit reform? Strike three on approving slot machines? Nope. The biggest legislative blow to Maryland's economy was the Assembly's failure to approve $23 million in funding for embryonic stem-cell research because of ethical objections to destroying tiny human embryos to obtain the cells.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Scientists urged senators yesterday to join the House in passing a measure to expand embryonic stem cell research, arguing that newer, uncontaminated cell lines now available cannot be used by federally funded investigators under President Bush's policy. A hearing, held by the Special Committee on Aging, was the first in the Senate since the House passed stem cell legislation late last month in defiance of Bush's veto threat. The House bill would allow federally funded research on thousands of frozen embryos that are stored in fertility centers and donated by couples who no longer need them.
NEWS
March 10, 2009
President Barack Obama's decision to lift the ban on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research affords U.S. scientists a chance to expand this potentially ground-breaking, disease-curing work and make up ground lost to researchers elsewhere whose hands weren't similarly tied. A memo also signed by the president yesterday would return science to its rightful place in government policymaking - above politics. The stem cell decision has been anxiously awaited by American researchers who have been limited in their work on embryonic stem cells since 2001, when President Bush restricted the use of federal funds to research involving a relatively small number of existing embryonic stem cell lines.
NEWS
By Curt I. Civin and E. Albert Reece | February 20, 2009
In the near future, President Barack Obama is widely expected to lift the ban on federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research, which has been in place since 2001 and has limited federal funding to only 21 existing lines. Lifting the ban is an important first step - but it is mostly symbolic. Unless it leads to a significant increase in funding for rebuilding the infrastructure this field needs to mature, it is likely to have little tangible effect. This would be very unfortunate, because the field of regenerative medicine - which utilizes stem cells, among other tools, to understand disease processes and to repair damaged organs - is ripe for development.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Stephanie Desmon and Matthew Hay Brown and Stephanie Desmon,matthew.brown@baltsun.com and stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | January 24, 2009
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given the go-ahead for a California biotechnology company to inject humans with embryonic stem cells for the first time - a turning point in the decade-long debate over whether the potential of the cells to heal injuries and cure diseases outweighs the ethical questions raised by their use. Geron Corp. plans to inject up to 10 recently injured paraplegics with the living cells this summer and monitor the patients throughout the year that follows.
NEWS
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 7, 2007
Taking the next step in a series of breakthrough stem-cell experiments, scientists have cured sickle- cell anemia in mice by rewinding their skin cells to an embryonic state and manipulating them to create healthy, genetically matched replacement tissue. After the repaired cells were transfused into the animals, they soon began producing healthy blood cells free of the crippling deformities that deprive organs of oxygen, scientists from the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 30, 2007
BOSTON -- I have a friend who dedicated her first book to her husband, "without whom this would never have been possible." Years later, when the husband was gone, she used to fantasize about tweaking her dedication: "To my husband, without whom this book would have been done five years earlier." I thought of her as the Bush administration claimed credit for a bona fide breakthrough in biology. Two groups of scientists, in Wisconsin and Japan, have found a way to reprogram ordinary skin cells so they behave like embryonic stem cells.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance and Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance,Sun reporters | November 21, 2007
Scientists in the U.S. and Japan have converted human skin cells into stem cells like the ones found in embryos, a breakthrough that could yield regenerative therapies without igniting the ethical debates that have embroiled the field for nearly a decade. Yesterday's announcements raise the possibility that cells taken from sick patients could be reprogrammed and used to repair tissues damaged by heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses. The technique, achieved earlier this year in mice, holds two potential advantages.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | April 11, 2001
In a feat of biological alchemy, scientists have converted human fat into cells that make muscle, bone and cartilage, suggesting that people's least-favorite body part could become a rich source of repair cells for disease or injury. The new fat stem cells "may take the use of fetal tissue or embryonic tissue off the table as a practical matter," said Dr. Marc H. Hedrick, a plastic surgery specialist at the University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine. The Bush administration has said it supports the use of adult stem cells but not embryonic ones.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance and Jonathan Bor and Frank Roylance,Sun reporters | November 21, 2007
Scientists in the U.S. and Japan have converted human skin cells into stem cells like the ones found in embryos, a breakthrough that could yield regenerative therapies without igniting the ethical debates that have embroiled the field for nearly a decade. Yesterday's announcements raise the possibility that cells taken from sick patients could be reprogrammed and used to repair tissues damaged by heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses. The technique, achieved earlier this year in mice, holds two potential advantages.
NEWS
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,Los Angeles Times | June 7, 2007
Scientists have succeeded in reprogramming ordinary cells from the tips of mouse tails and rewinding their developmental clocks so they are virtually indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells, according to studies published today. If the discovery applies to human cells - and researchers are optimistic that it will - it would offer a straightforward method for creating a limitless supply of cell lines tailor-made for patients without ethical strings attached. Three research groups said they accomplished their feat by activating four genes that are turned on in days-old embryos.
NEWS
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2007
Researchers have found stem cells in human amniotic fluid that appear to have many of the key benefits of embryonic stem cells while avoiding their knottiest ethical, medical and logistical drawbacks, according to a study published yesterday. The stem cells - easy to harvest from the fluid left over from amniocentesis tests given to pregnant women - were able to transform into new bone, heart muscle, blood vessels, fat, nerve and liver tissues, the study said. "So far, we've been successful with every cell type we've attempted to produce from these stem cells," said Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., and senior author of the report published online by the journal Nature Biotechnology.
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