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NEWS
November 12, 2003
On November 9, 2003 EMBRY G. SCOTT, SR. beloved husband of Patricia C. Scott (nee Crawford); loving father of Embry G. Jr., Thomas G., Henry A. and the late John C. Scott; dear brother of Henry W. Scott, Pattie W. Scott and Nan Blottner. Mr. Scott will lie in state at the Chapel of Stella Maris Thursday 12:30 to 1 p.m. the funeral hour. Interment private. Memorials in his name to St. Vincent de Paul of Baltimore, 320 Cathedral St., Baltimore, MD 21201 would be appreciated. Arrangements by the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | September 12, 2008
Frances C. Embry, a homemaker and volunteer, died Tuesday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at her Towson home. She was 93. Mary Frances Cockerham was born and raised in Gunnison, Miss., the daughter of a doctor and a retired nurse. She was 15 when she graduated from Gunnison High School and earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1934 from Blue Mountain College in Tupelo, Miss. After college, she taught high school in Marigold, Miss., and formed and coached the first girls basketball team at the school.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
Robert Campbell "Jake" Embry Sr., a retired radio broadcasting executive and civic activist who is credited with helping transform Baltimore into a major-league sports city, died of a blood clot yesterday at his Towson home. He was 93. Mr. Embry, who never was able to quite shed his Southern demeanor despite having lived in Baltimore since 1935, was born in Belzoni, Miss., the son of a lumber company bookkeeper. The family later moved to Yazoo City, where he graduated from high school and picked up the nickname that would stay with him for the remainder of his life.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Andrea Walker and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Andrea Walker,sun reporters | October 27, 2006
A group of prominent Baltimore business and civic leaders has launched an effort to buy The Baltimore Sun Co., sending a letter yesterday indicating its interest to the company's Chicago parent. Theodore G. Venetoulis, a former Baltimore County executive who lost a Democratic primary bid for governor in 1978, said he wrote Tribune Co. yesterday afternoon on behalf of the newly formed Baltimore Media Group. His letter expresses "strong interest" in acquiring The Sun and other assets held by The Baltimore Sun Co. Venetoulis chairs the group, which includes Abell Foundation President Robert C. Embry Jr. and longtime civic leader Walter Sondheim.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 9, 1993
Norris Embry, who lived in Baltimore for 17 years before his death in 1981, was interested in the art of the mentally ill and suffered from mental illness himself. In the current show of his work at Grimaldis, it is easy -- too easy, really -- to see the evidence of disturbance in the obsessively covered surfaces with their floating faces, which can often seem the manifestations of inner demons.Embry was a trained artist -- he went to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and later studied with Oskar Kokoschka -- and the influences of formal training and German expressionism are just as strongly evident here.
SPORTS
By Steve Love and Steve Love,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 18, 1993
RICHFIELD, Ohio -- When Michael Jordan rose off the floor of the Richfield Coliseum for The Shot II, lifting off like from a launching pad at Cape Canaveral, it is more than himself that he elevated.It is his game -- and team.In each of the last two NBA playoff seasons, he has seemed to rise higher and higher, and now this time is soaring toward a championship three-peat.His final 15-foot jumper over Gerald Wilkins with a second left last night beat the Cleveland Cavaliers, 103-101, and swept them from the Eastern semifinals.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and By Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2000
It's been a busy two weeks in the world according to Robert C. Embry Jr. First came the publication of a 500-page report on how to reorganize city government, which Embry helped write. The next day he announced a deal with the city school board to keep alive another of his creations, the Baraka School in Kenya for at-risk boys. He's been at the epicenter of efforts to resolve the financial problems of the city's showpiece movie theater, the Senator. On Wednesday, he was criticized as the chief ammunition loader for a new study that shoots holes in the way Maryland evaluates schools.
NEWS
March 10, 1995
In yesterday's story about the State Board of Education, the status of member Robert C. Embry's service was misstated. Mr. Embry's term of office will expire in June; the governor did not reappoint him.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | February 7, 1993
Twice, Robert C. Embry Jr. tentatively embarked on campaigns to become mayor of Baltimore. Twice, he changed his mind. Now, he is president of the Abell Foundation, spending the foundation's money on school reform, health care, economic development -- and arguably shaping the city's social policies as much as any mayor ever has.With $150 million in assets and $7.5 million to give away each year, Abell is not the city's biggest foundation. But it is the most aggressive.Abell's work is visible everywhere: The contraceptive Norplant is widely available in city clinics.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1999
A struggling, 110-year-old glass manufacturer that employs 300 will remain open in Baltimore after the Abell Foundation made an undisclosed investment to save it.The Carr-Lowrey Glass Co., which makes glass containers for cosmetics and perfumes at a plant at 2201 Kloman St., had been searching for a buyer for months before the Abell Foundation stepped in, said K. Wayne Long, vice chairman of the company's board."
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 5, 2006
Raymond "Chip" Mason is a big-time executive, big enough to land on a recent cover of Forbes. But can the guy pick a necktie? The photographer who shot Mason's picture for the magazine wasn't betting on it. So the day before the shoot, photographer Bill Cramer picked one up at Strawbridge & Clothier's. Mason showed up in a red tie with little yellow and blue dots. Perfectly nice, but it didn't do a thing for the photographer's gray backdrop. Mason agreed to wear the silver-and-steel-blue number Cramer brought along, even though he wasn't crazy about it. "He hated Bill's backup tie, but was a sport and agreed to wear it anyway," says Neil Binkley, marketing manager for the photographer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,Sun Staff | May 1, 2005
Just over 10 years ago, Robert C. Embry Jr., president of Baltimore's Abell Foundation, approached the city's middle-school principals with a simple question: What can I do to help you? The organization he led gave about $5 million a year to the public school system, and Embry wanted to know how he could generate the most bang for his bucks. Embry, a lifelong Baltimorean and former official of state and city schools, expected the usual requests for computers and other equipment. He was in for a surprise.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Mike Adams and Robert Little and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 14, 2004
David S. Cordish was supposed to be a lawyer. In the early years after graduating from the University of Maryland law school in 1963, Cordish toiled in Baltimore courtrooms, working for his father's Eutaw Street practice. But then a group of desperate investors persuaded Cordish to underwrite and manage their flailing Harford County retail project, and one of the nation's most-acclaimed developers emerged. When the Edgewood Shopping Center opened in the early 1970s - the first among dozens of strip malls that he would build and own - Cordish's future as a practicing attorney was effectively ended.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2004
THE CITY SCHOOLS were in crisis. The usual poohbahs - mayor, governor, superintendents, senators, delegates - were meeting. A news conference was called to announce the solution. And there, in his usual place on the edge of the spotlight, was this Zelig-like figure of Baltimore leadership - Bob Embry. Mayors and governors and superintendents and crises have come and gone. The constant has been the slightly dour face of Robert C. Embry Jr. Though he smiles easily, many see only those downturned eyebrows and lips, an expression of seriousness or disapproval, perhaps both.
NEWS
November 12, 2003
On November 9, 2003 EMBRY G. SCOTT, SR. beloved husband of Patricia C. Scott (nee Crawford); loving father of Embry G. Jr., Thomas G., Henry A. and the late John C. Scott; dear brother of Henry W. Scott, Pattie W. Scott and Nan Blottner. Mr. Scott will lie in state at the Chapel of Stella Maris Thursday 12:30 to 1 p.m. the funeral hour. Interment private. Memorials in his name to St. Vincent de Paul of Baltimore, 320 Cathedral St., Baltimore, MD 21201 would be appreciated. Arrangements by the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 14, 2003
NEW YORK -A bankruptcy judge in Manhattan agreed yesterday to block preferred shareholders from adding their own directors to the board of cable-television operator Adelphia Communications Corp. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Robert E. Gerber barred shareholders from acting until a later hearing on the matter. Adelphia, the fifth-largest cable-television operator, had asked Gerber to halt preferred shareholders from trying to expand the company's nine-member board by as many as six directors before it emerges from bankruptcy.
NEWS
July 1, 2003
Suddenly, on June 28, 2003, JOHN CRAWFORD SCOTT, beloved son of Embry G. Scott, Sr. and Patricia (nee Crawford); dear brother of Embry Scott, Jr., Henry A. Scott, and his wife Regina, Thomas G. Scott and his wife Patricia; dear uncle of Jonathan, David, Anna, Mary, Dan, Alex and James. A Memorial Service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc. 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26A) on Wednesday at 11 A.M. The family will receive friends Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Interment private.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | March 6, 1995
When Parris N. Glendening was running for governor, he promised to make education one of his top three priorities. But his first budget cut the funds for the state's universities and colleges. Now he's beginning to make decisions about elementary and secondary education. Is he committed to educational reform and excellence?Maybe it's too soon to tell. But the early signals aren't encouraging. Why, for example, didn't he reappoint Robert C. Embry Jr. to the State Board of Education?For the last six years, Mr. Embry has led a state board that has dramatically changed the direction of Maryland's schools.
NEWS
July 1, 2003
Suddenly, on June 28, 2003, JOHN CRAWFORD SCOTT, beloved son of Embry G. Scott, Sr. and Patricia (nee Crawford); dear brother of Embry Scott, Jr., Henry A. Scott, and his wife Regina, Thomas G. Scott and his wife Patricia; dear uncle of Jonathan, David, Anna, Mary, Dan, Alex and James. A Memorial Service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc. 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26A) on Wednesday at 11 A.M. The family will receive friends Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Interment private.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
Robert Campbell "Jake" Embry Sr., a retired radio broadcasting executive and civic activist who is credited with helping transform Baltimore into a major-league sports city, died of a blood clot yesterday at his Towson home. He was 93. Mr. Embry, who never was able to quite shed his Southern demeanor despite having lived in Baltimore since 1935, was born in Belzoni, Miss., the son of a lumber company bookkeeper. The family later moved to Yazoo City, where he graduated from high school and picked up the nickname that would stay with him for the remainder of his life.
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