Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEmanuel Ungaro
IN THE NEWS

Emanuel Ungaro

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,New York Times News Service | January 28, 1993
PARIS -- Karl Lagerfeld added plastic to the haute couture fabrics he used for his Chanel collection because he thought it was fun. Emanuel Ungaro invented a never-never land for his fairy-tale clothes, and Philippe Venet pursued his simple classics in a low key. Each interpreted the couture concept in an individual manner as the spring and summer fashion shows this week.How does plastic fit in with the couture's chiffons, beads and satins? In Lagerfeld's hands, it works just fine. First he has the material beaded by Lesage, the world's most prestigious embroiderer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Jeannine Stein and Jeannine Stein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1996
At 5 feet 2 inches, Carolyn Curiel walks tall and dresses "artfully." For the 42-year-old senior speech writer and special assistant to President Clinton, "it's all part of the package." Her clothes -- sleek, understated designer suits, jackets and blouses -- hover in the 16 to 20 size range.That she can find pieces with the tailored fit and styling details of the latest ready-to-wear is nothing short of a minor miracle for a boomer-age woman who grew up having to improvise a wardrobe.The past few years have seen the beginning of a large-size revolution as designers and retailers realize that big women don't covet polyester stretch pants, boxy tunics and pup-tent dresses, but do want stylish, well-made clothes.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Marylou Luther | December 26, 1990
Dear Marylou: My mom gave me her old mink "shrug," as she calls it. The quality of the fur is still quite good, as it has been in cold storage for years. I'm 35, live in Manhattan and would like your ideas for transforming Mom's shrug into something more appropriate for now. W.M., New York, N.Y.Dear W.M.: How about turning your shrug into a hood, as illustrated here? As you probably know, hoods are very much in fashion right now, and would certainly keep you warm when the chill factor gets to zero.
FEATURES
By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,New York Times News Service | January 28, 1993
PARIS -- Karl Lagerfeld added plastic to the haute couture fabrics he used for his Chanel collection because he thought it was fun. Emanuel Ungaro invented a never-never land for his fairy-tale clothes, and Philippe Venet pursued his simple classics in a low key. Each interpreted the couture concept in an individual manner as the spring and summer fashion shows this week.How does plastic fit in with the couture's chiffons, beads and satins? In Lagerfeld's hands, it works just fine. First he has the material beaded by Lesage, the world's most prestigious embroiderer.
FEATURES
By KIM TRAVERSO | October 10, 1991
It looks like designers are finally coming down to earth.The clothes of haute couture creators like Giorgio Armani and Emanuel Ungaro are becoming more accessible to those of us who can't shell out big bucks for an outfit.Instead of paying thousands to own a garment with a Giorgio Armani label, it'll soon be possible to buy an Armani sweater for no more than $50. And while Emanuel Ungaro dresses can cost $5,000 apiece, in his new Emanuel line, you can get one for closer to $500.A few secondary lines, such as Donna Karan's DKNY, have been around for several years, but the weak economy of recent times has caused their numbers to explode.
FEATURES
By Jeannine Stein and Jeannine Stein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1996
At 5 feet 2 inches, Carolyn Curiel walks tall and dresses "artfully." For the 42-year-old senior speech writer and special assistant to President Clinton, "it's all part of the package." Her clothes -- sleek, understated designer suits, jackets and blouses -- hover in the 16 to 20 size range.That she can find pieces with the tailored fit and styling details of the latest ready-to-wear is nothing short of a minor miracle for a boomer-age woman who grew up having to improvise a wardrobe.The past few years have seen the beginning of a large-size revolution as designers and retailers realize that big women don't covet polyester stretch pants, boxy tunics and pup-tent dresses, but do want stylish, well-made clothes.
FEATURES
By Bernadene Morris and Bernadene Morris,New York Times News Service | February 27, 1992
Forget for the moment about hem lengths. The big news for next fall is skirts that swing.At Valentino, flat box pleats whip into motion when the wearer moves. Emanuel Ungaro favors delicate crystal pleats all around that flutter gently beneath fitted body lines.And Yves Saint Laurent likes a modest flare to the skirt beneath his curving waistlines.In their early "pre-fall" collections, these major European designers have not attempted to rock the fashion establishment. The vast majority of styles stop above the knees, with only an occasional venture to calf length or below.
FEATURES
By Trish Donnally and Trish Donnally,San Francisco Chronicle | October 25, 1990
Paris--Super-sexy, fleshy fashions filled the French spring ready-to-wear collections.Leggings, cat suits, bike shorts, bras, corsets and slip dresses, mid-thigh or higher, are among the many underwear-as-outerwear looks for spring.Bright colors, black and white, and a parade of prints are in store. Spring boots are the surprising, and silly, accessory of the season.More dresses were cut for spring than we've seen in years.In his fashion show Tuesday, Emanuel Ungaro, who received the only standing ovation of the week, showed a flourish of dresses: snug, loose, solid, chintz, high or drop-waisted, in bright colors or pastels.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 16, 1995
Q: I have a big bust and cannot wear the simple slip dresses. I also find it embarrassing to show too much bust. What do you suggest?A: Forget about the simple slip dress and look for one with a built-in bra. Many designers realize how impractical the basic slip is for most women.In Paris, Emanuel Ungaro explains: "I have always believed in dressing real women, and real women need structure in clothes. Even when I use the most fluid fabrics I add structure. It's concealed, but it's there."
NEWS
July 20, 1996
Chris Komar, 47, a dancer and assistant artistic director of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, died Wednesday of AIDS in New York.Komar joined the Cunningham troupe in 1972, creating roles in more than 45 dances. He retired from performing in 1993 but continued to work with the troupe until his death.In 1973, Komar began teaching at the Cunningham studio in 1973 and helped with repertory workshops throughout the United States and Europe. He staged dances around the world, among them the Theatre du Silence in France, the Ohio Ballet, American Ballet Theater, the Paris Opera Ballet and Mikhail Baryshnikov's White Oak Dance Project.
FEATURES
By KIM TRAVERSO | October 10, 1991
It looks like designers are finally coming down to earth.The clothes of haute couture creators like Giorgio Armani and Emanuel Ungaro are becoming more accessible to those of us who can't shell out big bucks for an outfit.Instead of paying thousands to own a garment with a Giorgio Armani label, it'll soon be possible to buy an Armani sweater for no more than $50. And while Emanuel Ungaro dresses can cost $5,000 apiece, in his new Emanuel line, you can get one for closer to $500.A few secondary lines, such as Donna Karan's DKNY, have been around for several years, but the weak economy of recent times has caused their numbers to explode.
FEATURES
By Marylou Luther | December 26, 1990
Dear Marylou: My mom gave me her old mink "shrug," as she calls it. The quality of the fur is still quite good, as it has been in cold storage for years. I'm 35, live in Manhattan and would like your ideas for transforming Mom's shrug into something more appropriate for now. W.M., New York, N.Y.Dear W.M.: How about turning your shrug into a hood, as illustrated here? As you probably know, hoods are very much in fashion right now, and would certainly keep you warm when the chill factor gets to zero.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | September 30, 1993
If there's a bargain out there, Judy Naughton will find it.For the past eight years, she's discovered some of her best buys at the "Johns Hopkins Best Dressed Sale & Boutique," which runs today through Saturday at the Evergreen Carriage House.As a member of the Hopkins Women's Board, she admits she may be a little partial. But a steal is still a steal. And the Escadas, Ungaros and Givenchys she's added to her wardrobe fall into that category.She offers no apologies for hours spent rooting through the racks.
FEATURES
By Anne-Marie Schiro and Anne-Marie Schiro,New York Times News Service | July 16, 1992
First there were designer collections. You know, Yves Saint Laurent, Bill Blass, Calvin Klein and such. Then as prices headed for the stratosphere, designers started knocking themselves off in less expensive secondary, or diffusion, lines.As those prices started nudging the four-figure bracket, some designers brought out still lower-priced collections, like Emanuel by Emanuel Ungaro, introduced last year, with a top price around $500. Even those prices are too high for the vast majority of women, but when a designer brings out a less expensive line, it is usually weekend wear, like Donna Karan's DKNY and A/X Armani Exchange.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.