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Emancipation Proclamation

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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Over the past 181 years, the bill of sale has turned a pale tan. The ink has faded from black to brown and includes elaborate flourishes that seem ill-suited to such a grim and ugly business. On Feb. 25, 1832, the bill reads, a slave named William Johnson "about eighteen years of age" was sold to the owner of an Alabama plantation for $550 - or roughly $14,000 in today's currency. "This document changed my life," the Los Angeles-based philanthropist and collector Bernard Kinsey says about the piece of paper he received as a gift in the 1970s from a friend.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Over the past 181 years, the bill of sale has turned a pale tan. The ink has faded from black to brown and includes elaborate flourishes that seem ill-suited to such a grim and ugly business. On Feb. 25, 1832, the bill reads, a slave named William Johnson "about eighteen years of age" was sold to the owner of an Alabama plantation for $550 - or roughly $14,000 in today's currency. "This document changed my life," the Los Angeles-based philanthropist and collector Bernard Kinsey says about the piece of paper he received as a gift in the 1970s from a friend.
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By Lerone Bennett Jr | February 25, 2001
The following is an abridged excerpt from Lerone Bennett Jr.'s "Forced into Glory: Abraham Lincoln's White Dream" (Johnson Publishing Co., Chicago, 2000). The book is the product of more than 30 years of research. Bennett, the executive editor of Ebony magazine, also is the author of the 1961 black history classic, "Before the Mayflower." THE PRESIDENTIAL campaign of 1860 was over, and the victor was stretching his legs and shaking off the cares of the world in his temporary office in the state capitol in Springfield, Illinois.
EXPLORE
February 13, 2013
The Hays-Heighe House at Harford Community College will host Emancipation and Its Legacies, a national traveling exhibition on display through Feb. 25. In conjunction with the exhibit, the Hays-Heighe House is sponsoring free programs and other events for the public. Developed by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in partnership with the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Emancipation and Its Legacies marks the sesquicentennial of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2006
Almanac--Jan. 1-- 1863: President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves. 1901: Commonwealth of Australia was proclaimed.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 12, 1991
EXCERPT FROM Kitty Kelley's new book "Mary Todd Lincoln: The Unauthorized Biography." (Simon & Schuster, $24.95):. . . the whole business of the Emancipation Proclamation which Lincoln, the gin fumes rolling off him, had nothing to do with, as we shall soon see.The year was 1862. The war between the North and South was raging. Union forces had bogged down near Richmond and suffered another serious setback at Bull Run. Mary Todd Lincoln was desperate to lift the gloom that enveloped Washington and to avert attention from her scandalous affair with prominent abolitionist Elijah Cummings.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Notes Bloody histories: For Marylanders interested in learning more about the important role their state played in the Civil War, there is no better place to start than reading books assessing the bloody Battle of Antietam. Fought on Sept. 17, 1862, along Antietam Creek near Sharpsburg, it was the war's first major battle to take place on Northern soil and was the bloodiest single-day struggle in American history, with almost 23,000 casualties. Union forces fought the Confederate invaders to a standstill, but gave President Abraham Lincoln the confidence to announce his Emancipation Proclamation, laying out plans to free all slaves in Confederate states.
EXPLORE
February 13, 2013
The Hays-Heighe House at Harford Community College will host Emancipation and Its Legacies, a national traveling exhibition on display through Feb. 25. In conjunction with the exhibit, the Hays-Heighe House is sponsoring free programs and other events for the public. Developed by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in partnership with the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Emancipation and Its Legacies marks the sesquicentennial of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
Wilmer Mumma began, with a hint of bitterness in his voice, to tell his family's story of the Battle of Antietam.The Mummas lived on a farm in Sharpsburg 135 years ago, he said. Confederate troops led by Gen. Robert E. Lee burned it to the ground. With 13 children, the German Baptist family rebuilt the farm within 18 months, he said.Nearly 30 years later, Mumma said, in 1890, the postmaster of Sharpsburg received a letter of apology from a North Carolina man who said he was the officer who reluctantly followed orders and destroyed the Mumma farm.
FEATURES
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | December 31, 1992
Washington -- The paper has yellowed and the ink has faded, but the Emancipation Proclamation still conveys the power of its promise to free millions of slaves.Signed with a shaking hand by President Abraham Lincoln on New Year's Day 130 years ago, the groundbreaking document declared that "all persons held as slaves" in states that had risen up in rebellion "are, and henceforward shall be, free."To mark the anniversary, the fragile five-page proclamation will be taken from a dark vault and put on display today for a five-day exhibition at the National Archives in Washington.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2010
At the entrance to the Towson Library, visitors encounter a life-size photograph of Abraham Lincoln - familiar with his towering height and black attire, but unusual because he is clean-shaven and his eyes are stark blue. The photo is the first of many in a multipanel exhibit that focuses on the 16th president and his struggles with slavery and the Civil War. The library opened the traveling exhibit, "Forever Free: Abraham Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation," Thursday, and the staff has put together books, documentaries and Lincoln memorabilia to accompany it - including a collection of Civil War-era artifacts on loan from the Baltimore County Historical Society and a trunk borrowed from the Gettysburg National Military Park and filled with relics of 19th-century military life.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | February 24, 2008
President Lincoln The Duty of a Statesman By William Lee Miller Alfred A. Knopf / 512 pages / $30 Gen. George B. McClellan called him an "idiot," a "well-meaning baboon" and "the original gorilla." Edwin M. Stanton, the attorney general held over from the Buchanan administration, dismissed him as "a low, cunning clown," an "imbecile." Abraham Lincoln fooled them. We now know him through a tableau of heroic images: "Honest Abe," a rail-splitter who studied by firelight; the "Great Debater," locked in combat with Stephen A. Douglas; "Father Abraham," who led the nation through the bloody, fratricidal Civil War; "The Great Emancipator," who freed African-American slaves; and the martyred leader, assassinated on Good Friday, soon after he promised "malice toward none and charity for all."
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Notes Bloody histories: For Marylanders interested in learning more about the important role their state played in the Civil War, there is no better place to start than reading books assessing the bloody Battle of Antietam. Fought on Sept. 17, 1862, along Antietam Creek near Sharpsburg, it was the war's first major battle to take place on Northern soil and was the bloodiest single-day struggle in American history, with almost 23,000 casualties. Union forces fought the Confederate invaders to a standstill, but gave President Abraham Lincoln the confidence to announce his Emancipation Proclamation, laying out plans to free all slaves in Confederate states.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | September 21, 2006
Almost exactly a year after August Wilson's untimely death at age 60, the Vagabond Players is honoring the playwright's memory with a moving production of one of his most magnificent works - Joe Turner's Come and Gone. Chronologically the second play in Wilson's decade-by-decade chronicle of 20th century African-American life, Joe Turner is set in a Pittsburgh boarding house in 1911. The Vagabonds production is directed by Amini Johari-Courts, who also staged this play at Arena Players in 1993, five years after it was seen on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2006
Almanac--Jan. 1-- 1863: President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves. 1901: Commonwealth of Australia was proclaimed.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | April 23, 2003
Talk with George W. Collins these days, and the man brims with good cheer. He boasts about his young grandson's football prowess, jokes about politicians, shares asides about the foibles of today's television news stars, vents about the pomposities of talk radio. Collins has the stature to muse widely on such subjects. A self-described "dinosaur," the 77-year-old journalist covered some of the most sobering issues that Marylanders confronted over the 20th century. As a reporter and then editor-in-chief for Baltimore's Afro-American and a staffer at WMAR-TV, among other outlets, Collins chronicled the rise and fall of Maryland politician Spiro T. Agnew, wrote about education, and tracked policies on poverty and other social issues.
NEWS
January 22, 1998
Emancipation Proclamation article misleadsYour article on the 135th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation ("Lincoln's proclamation freeing slaves in 1863 recalled and honored," Jan. 5) oversimplified the meaning of this document.This act did not free all the slaves. Not one of the approximately 80,000 people held in bondage in Maryland was freed Jan. 1, 1863, by Lincoln's edict.The act only affected slavery within states or portions of states that were rebelling against the Union. Slavery remained intact in Maryland, Delaware, Missouri and Kentucky -- slave states that never left the Union -- as well as in portions of Confederate states under Union army occupation.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Abraham Lincoln found his hand shaking when he sat down in his study to sign the Emancipation Proclamation, the landmark document in the liberation of American slaves.He had spent most of his day on Jan. 1, 1863, greeting guests at the traditional New Year's Day reception at the White House, shaking hands with his Cabinet, the diplomatic corps, Army and Navy officers and finally the public."If my name ever goes down in history, it will be for this act, and my whole soul is in it," Lincoln said, according to the historian Gerald J. Prokopowicz.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | September 17, 2002
WHILE THE concept of reparations for American chattel slavery remains a subject of divisive debate, I cannot help but be mindful of those, who, 140 years ago, in the fields of western Maryland, made the ultimate sacrifice in the struggle for a United States free from the stain of human bondage. Sept. 17, 1862, was the bloodiest day in American history, even following two world wars, Korea, Vietnam and the horrors of Sept. 11. There were 23,000 American casualties at Antietam Creek. A firestorm raged in early America over slavery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | November 11, 2001
In 1949 -- before he ever imagined becoming a Broadway producer -- Philip Rose was working as a singer at a family resort called Camp Unity in Wingdale, N.Y. Among his co-workers was a young waitress named Lorraine Hansberry. "There was a thing at the camp where on Sunday afternoons people would get up and discuss whatever they wanted to, and she took over one of those discussions," says Rose, author of the recently released theatrical memoir You Can't Do That on Broadway! (Limelight Editions, $25)
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