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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
As I watched Tuesday while the anchors on “Fox & Friends” leveled unsubstantiated charges against Rep. Elijah Cummings as if they were facts, I couldn't help thinking how much more dangerous Sen. Joe McCarthy might have been in the 1950s if there had been a show like this to amplify his reckless allegations. The Fox News morning show was playing one of cable talk's dirtier games, and the longtime Democratic congressman from Baltimore was its target for his role in the House IRS probe.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | August 3, 2014
Fact: Captured Hamas fighters confirm that their maze of secret tunnels into Israel was to be the entry point for a series of coordinated terror attacks during the Jewish High Holidays - all in order to massacre Israeli citizens at lightly guarded border settlements. Opinion: Americans should keep this scenario in mind as Secretary of State John Kerry readily adopts Hamas talking points and positions in his attempts to secure a "humanitarian" cease-fire. Hamas views such cessations of hostilities as mere opportunities to re-load in their ongoing campaign to reign terror (and ultimately destroy)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
Here's the letter that Open Table sent to its restaurant partners at 5:25 today - RG Dear Valued Restaurant Partner, We wanted to alert you to a problem we had with our automated reservation confirmation, change and reminder emails last night. Some of the reservation emails sent last evening prior to 9:41 PM PST erroneously mentioned in the text that the reservation was eligible for a 30% discount. We are in the process of resending corrected emails to those diners affected.
NEWS
June 28, 2014
In The Sun's June 25 edition I see that you failed to cover the unfolding Lois Lerner email scandal ("Republicans blast IRS over lost Lerner emails," June 18). I can't believe how partisan your editors are. Reporters and editors are supposed to cover the news fairly and completely. The missing emails is a huge crime that affects all Americans regardless of political affiliation. Please start doing your jobs. Fred Borman - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | May 8, 2012
A series of emails between Gov. Martin O'Malley  and Purdue Industry's top lawyer have drawn criticism from an environmental group for showing undue "coziness" between the two. O'Malley's office denies that conclusion -- but the exchanges do provide political-types a peek into how the state's governor manages key relationships (and some insight as to what exactly he's doing with his Blackberry all the time.) The emails , obtained by public interest organization Food and Water Watch, cover three main topics: O'Malley's attempts to bring Perdue on board with a legislative priority; the governor smoothing ruffled feelings from the poultry giant after a news story the company didn't like; and requests by the lawyer the company for help securing federal funds for a project he supports.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
Frank M. Conaway says he had nothing to do with emails that first called and then canceled a news conference Thursday at which he was supposedly to make an "important announcement. " The messages, which hit inboxes on the first day of early voting in the Democratic mayoral primary, set off speculation that Conaway was planning to withdraw from the race, as he did in 2007. But Conaway, one of several candidates challenging Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in the Sept. 13 primary, said he did not send the emails.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | July 10, 2013
When The Baltimore Sun requested three days of emails sent to or by a trio of officers who help run Baltimore's troubled speed camera program, the Police Department made clear the messages would be released only at a cost. As in about $2,000, possibly more. Yet the city Department of Transportation didn't charge The Sun anything for 6,400 pages of emails that were sent to or by several of its employees. Same city government, same legal department, same state public records law - but notably different outcomes that point to inconsistency when it come to applying the Maryland Public Information Act. The Sun asked both the police and transportation departments for emails that were written in mid-April, when the city abruptly suspended its red light and speed camera program amid fresh signs that some motorists had been wrongly ticketed.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
As Maryland officials touted their implementation of the Affordable Care Act, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown was front and center - proudly describing the state as a national leader in preparing for the overhaul. But even though Brown was helping to lead the health care effort, he wrote no emails to the state workers overseeing development of the state's online health insurance marketplace - at least none that his office deemed fit for public release. The Baltimore Sun investigated the botched Oct. 1 rollout of the Maryland health insurance exchange, and reporters requested emails sent to and from Brown on the issue.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
In Anne Arundel County, public relations appear to go hand-in-hand with police work. Arrested the nephew of an Annapolis mayoral candidate? Run that up the ranks to the chief. A television producer wants to interview a detective about gangs? “HIGHLY” recommend a public information officer sits in and “ensure he stays on course.” Make sure the chief signs off on that, too. The Anne Arundel County Police Department released hundreds of emails this month detailing interactions with the media.
NEWS
June 28, 2014
In The Sun's June 25 edition I see that you failed to cover the unfolding Lois Lerner email scandal ("Republicans blast IRS over lost Lerner emails," June 18). I can't believe how partisan your editors are. Reporters and editors are supposed to cover the news fairly and completely. The missing emails is a huge crime that affects all Americans regardless of political affiliation. Please start doing your jobs. Fred Borman - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
Sean Welsh and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Have you tried Bel Air Today - a free email newsletter from The Aegis and The Baltimore Sun? The newsletter will compile the top news of the day, neatly packaged in a digital format to enjoy as you peruse your email and enjoy your morning coffee or breakfast. The main course is Bel Air news - news, sports, opinion and more. But Bel Air Today will include a side of regional and trending news, helping get you off to an informed start to your day. The newsletter is mobile friendly, too, so you'll be able to read while you're brushing your teeth, sitting at the bus stop or waiting for that early morning meeting to start.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
As I watched Tuesday while the anchors on “Fox & Friends” leveled unsubstantiated charges against Rep. Elijah Cummings as if they were facts, I couldn't help thinking how much more dangerous Sen. Joe McCarthy might have been in the 1950s if there had been a show like this to amplify his reckless allegations. The Fox News morning show was playing one of cable talk's dirtier games, and the longtime Democratic congressman from Baltimore was its target for his role in the House IRS probe.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
City and state officials are re-evaluating their approach to a proposed railroad cargo facility in Southwest Baltimore, acknowledging that their initial response to community concerns fell flat. The public backlash stalled the CSX Corp. project, which is nearly a year behind schedule, and created tension between local officials, who are collaborating on bringing a project considered critical to the port of Baltimore to fruition, according to interviews and internal email. "It's a difficult project.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Goucher College sent congratulatory emails to the parents of 60 applicants on March 12 telling them their children had been admitted. The message from the small liberal arts college in Towson contained the words every parent of a high school senior likes to get: Your "offer of admission was mailed today, but I wanted to let you know the good news now, so that your family can celebrate tonight. " Except that after celebrating that night, the families learned the next day that the admission message was a mistake and that the students had not been accepted.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Elisabeth Smith is not a navigator hired by the Maryland's health exchange. She can't help anyone sign up for health insurance. Please stop emailing her. Smith isn't sure who is handing out her personal email address, a Gmail account, and she asked exchange officials to stop months ago. But the messages kept coming, peaking in December at up to a dozen a day. Similar pleas for help have finally stopped at the pottery supply business run...
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
A Baltimore transportation official asked the agency's director if he'd been able to "tap into" email records of an employee suspected of leaking information to The Baltimore Sun about the city's troubled speed camera program, according to records obtained under the Public Information Act. The question came in a Dec. 18 email from James Harkness, the head of the division that oversees the mothballed speed and red-light camera program. "Were you able to tap into email records of the individual I suspect of being the 'source' in Luke's article?"
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
For months, The Baltimore Sun has sought to inspect the emails of former Chief Technology Officer Rico J. Singleton - who resigned in February after an audit detailed ethical violations in New York - but the city rebuffed those public information requests. With the release of a city inspector general's investigative report that detailed possible conflicts of interest and wasteful practices in the Mayor's Office of Information Technology, emails from Singleton and others were made public.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
Baltimore elected officials said Friday they were outraged by an inspector general's report that found the Mayor's Office of Information Technology and a former deputy mayor withheld information from and misled city officials about a controversial project to install nearly $675,000 in phone and computer equipment. "I am extremely concerned if it happens to be the case that the administration is engaged in misleading top city officials," said Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke. "If it proves to be the case, I will say that I am deeply concerned about this approach to government and to life.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Carroll County commissioners have lost their case against several media organizations and now must decide whether to comply with a judge's order to turn over email lists or appeal. The five commissioners plan to meet in closed session Thursday to discuss the case, which resulted in a court order last week giving the board until early February to provide email distribution lists used by the commissioners, including the email addresses. If they choose to challenge the ruling before the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, they would have until mid-February to do so. In an opinion issued Jan. 16, retired Howard County Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney ruled against the commissioners, who in March denied a Carroll County Times reporter's request under the Maryland Public Information Act for mailing lists, including email addresses, that the commissioners use to contact groups of people.
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