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By Colin Nickerson and Colin Nickerson,BOSTON GLOBE | December 25, 1999
HAFNARFJORDUR, Iceland -- This can be a tough country for blasting out a foundation or constructing a roadbed.Never mind the boiling geysers, wind-blasted precipices or frozen barrens. It's not the razor-sharp lava rock that daunts builders; it's the hidden people lurking below."There are all sorts of beings beneath our stones," says Brynjolfur Snorrason, a folklorist often asked to advise contractors on how best to avoid the lairs of Iceland's elves and other seldom-seen creatures, whose presence nonetheless seems to permeate this far northern island nation.
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EXPLORE
November 30, 2011
If you see Santa Claus, or perhaps some elves or some reindeer, running through the streets of Havre de Grace, don't be alarmed. Chances are good they'll be trotting through town as part of the Running With the Reindeer 5K race. This is the inaugural 5K Run and 1K Fun Walk for the Jane M. Johnston Foundation, which raises money to help children fighting cancer. The foundation was started by Mrs. Johnston's husband, Alex. Just before she died four and a half years ago of melanoma, Mrs. Johnston asked her husband of 15 years "to do something" for kids with cancer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | December 9, 2001
We patriotic Americans can only hope it is not too late to convene a military tribunal to check out the suspicious character known as "Santa Claus." If we can catch him. He's a slippery old coot. "Santa" (he often uses only one name, like Carlos the Jackal) appears in the northern sky every year on Christmas Eve. The aerospace warning system NORAD invariably tracks him. But he always manages to infiltrate U.S. air space. No one is quite sure what his nationality is. It's unclear whether he's an American citizen.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare , mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | December 14, 2009
The fairly typical letters to Santa asked for popular toys and games or "a puppy with small paws." One writer hoped to pin down Santa's exact arrival time at his home so they could chat. But these are no ordinary letters to the North Pole. Some were written with a few typos in Braille by young blind children or dictated to their parents. They were rerouted to the National Federation of the Blind in Baltimore, whose staff has replied to each one in Braille. The agency is answering letters from blind children, mailing them personalized replies in Braille and a translation in print so other family members can read along.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | December 7, 1997
To: Santa ClausFrom: Michael Dresser, Dionysus Consultants Inc.Re: Wine Gifts Division, North Pole EnterprisesDear Santa,DCI's independent elf auditors have found a serious problem among your wine-loving customers.The Belief in Santa (BIS) ratings among wine enthusiasts are down to their lowest level (38 percent) since the poor Bordeaux ** vintages of the early 1970s.This is an alarming number, because wine lovers are by nature cheerful folks who have long formed a key pro-Santa constituency.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE FREEDOM'S CHILDREN. Ellen Levine. Putnam. 167 pages. $16.95 | January 24, 1993
DOWN BY THEENCHANTED STREAM.Sally Bowen; illustrations byKristina Wasmer.B&A Press.36 pages. $10.95 (paperback).In her first children's book, Lutherville teacher Sally Bowen tells the story of Emmy, a lonely little girl who loves to play by the stream near her grandfather's house. Sometimes Emmy catches glimpse of one of the stream elves -- tiny creatures whose laughing faces are surrounded by flower petals.One summer afternoon, a playful elf named Big-Time Charlie introduces himself and his family to Emmy.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | December 29, 2006
Here's a coincidence: Two shows about the Santa Claus at Macy's department store in New York are being performed in Columbia. The Santaland Diaries, playing at Rep Stage through Jan. 7, provides an ironic counterpoint to the current attraction at Toby's Dinner Theatre (reviewed Dec. 15). Here's Love, at Toby's, is a musical version of the movie Miracle on 34th Street. It is strong on sentiment, calculated to kindle a warm glow in the audience. The show's Santa Claus is just what we would want him to be -- sincere, loving, selfless.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Contributing Writer | December 2, 1994
Kids no longer have to wait in long lines at the mall to give Santa their Christmas lists, because Santa and his sleigh are flying through cyberspace these days. If you send him your requests on the Internet via e-mail, he'll reply right away.There are several addresses:santorthpole.net,santorth.pole.org, orelveorth.pole.org.Even more sophisticated is Santa's World Wide Web site on the Internet, where you can read messages from Santa, the elves and the reindeer, and even get a weather report from the North Pole.
FEATURES
By Chris Van Allsburg | December 20, 1998
The North Pole. It was a huge city standing alone at the top of the world, filled with factories where every Christmas toy was made.At first they saw no elves."
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | July 28, 1996
The Weller Pottery Co. of Zanesville, Ohio, made a number of different garden ornaments. The pottery, which opened in the 1920s, closed in 1948. The company was well-known for its vases, jardinieres and floral ceramics.The company's catalogs pictured realistic, life-sized birds, such as a goose, a pelican and a pair of swans, the largest 20 inches high.Weller also sold a 7-inch squirrel, a 15-inch crow and a 13-inch-long rabbit. They were all molded and colored to appear real when placed in the garden.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | December 25, 2008
(An exchange of holiday greetings between The Baltimore Sun and the city's Police Department.) The cop shop reporters were snug at their desks, While visions of prizes danced in their heads. But the scanner was quiet; no crime to report; Nothing, nada; the blotter, quite short. The editors moaned; this can't be, they mused; Christmas cheer doesn't sell! We need bad news! Away to the windows, reporters ran like a flash Notebooks in hands, they threw open the sash. And there to behold, under a bright shining star, The flashing blue lights of a city police car!
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 22, 2007
The heat descended on the building about 9 p.m. Thursday, sirens blaring, red and blue lights flashing and creating an almost hypnotic, strobe-light effect. The cops emerged from their cars and entered Mason Memorial Church of God in Christ in the 2600 block of Frederick Ave. "I thought they were raiding the church," observed Wayne Thomas, who was standing nearby. "I've never seen a church get raided before." In a way, Thomas was right: Mason Memorial was being raided. But the cheers, the applause, the whoops of sheer glee and delight from church members as police went into the church should have been the tip-off: these churchgoers loved this kind of raid.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | December 19, 2007
Children are not the only ones getting toys this Christmas. At the National Aquarium in Baltimore, a room normally used to hold classes for visitors was turned yesterday into a version of Santa's workshop, in which staff members and volunteers - a few in elves' hats - made dozens of toys and gadgets to keep the aquarium's tenants occupied, focused and happy. "We'll make toys or objects for the animals that stimulate some of their natural foraging behavior," said Crystal Mumaw, a marine mammal trainer, as festive antlers bobbed on her head.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | December 29, 2006
Here's a coincidence: Two shows about the Santa Claus at Macy's department store in New York are being performed in Columbia. The Santaland Diaries, playing at Rep Stage through Jan. 7, provides an ironic counterpoint to the current attraction at Toby's Dinner Theatre (reviewed Dec. 15). Here's Love, at Toby's, is a musical version of the movie Miracle on 34th Street. It is strong on sentiment, calculated to kindle a warm glow in the audience. The show's Santa Claus is just what we would want him to be -- sincere, loving, selfless.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
The result is a moment steeped in tradition and virtually devoid of high drama. This afternoon, President Bush will stand before a gathering at the National Christmas Tree on the Ellipse and pull a lever from a switchbox. Then, if all goes according to plan, anticipation will then give way to an outpouring of light: Decorations on the 40-foot, live Colorado blue spruce will radiate like sparklers set against a sunbeam, prompting cheers and camera flashes. What you won't see are people who have been working since Nov. 1 to ensure that the tree lighting and other events, including musical performances, at the Christmas Pageant of Peace go off without a hitch.
NEWS
March 2, 2004
On February 29, 2004, ELVED LEWIS; beloved husband of Alice R. Little Lewis; devoted father of Joseph E. Lewis and wife Suzanne. Also survived by one granddaughter Anne C. Williams. A funeral service will be held at the Lassahn Funeral Home Inc., 7401 Belair Rd on Wednesday, at 12 noon. Entombment Gardens of Faith. The family will receive friends on Tuesday, 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 pm.
FEATURES
By Mary McNamara and Mary McNamara,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2004
It hasn't always been this easy to be a Tolkien fan. There was a time in the not-too-distant past that Tolkienites occupied the vaguely sinister and decidedly weird regions shared by Dungeons & Dragons players, members of creative anachronistic societies and women who collected flower fairies and unicorn figurines. This was, of course, before director Peter Jackon's Lord of the Rings trilogy made it cool to once again speak in Elvish. Science fiction has always been regarded as a more acceptable obsession: It was masculine, based on science and reason.
NEWS
By KEVIN COWHERD | December 25, 1994
To: All elves, support personnelFrom: Santa ClausRe: Annual update on operationsOnce again we delivered nearly 2 billion toys to good little boys and girls around the world; many thanks to all who worked so hard.Last night's activities did not go quite as smoothly as planned, however.A number of PETA activists delayed our sleigh's planned 6 p.m. departure with a noisy protest near the stables.Their central complaint: Asking eight tiny reindeer to circumnavigate the globe while lugging some 200,000 Gymnast Barbies, 500,000 Power Rangers, countless sleds, baseball gloves, Nintendo games and so on constitutes cruelty toward animals, a systemic pattern of abuse and blah, blah, blah.
FEATURES
By Mary McNamara and Mary McNamara,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2004
It hasn't always been this easy to be a Tolkien fan. There was a time in the not-too-distant past that Tolkienites occupied the vaguely sinister and decidedly weird regions shared by Dungeons & Dragons players, members of creative anachronistic societies and women who collected flower fairies and unicorn figurines. This was, of course, before director Peter Jackon's Lord of the Rings trilogy made it cool to once again speak in Elvish. Science fiction has always been regarded as a more acceptable obsession: It was masculine, based on science and reason.
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