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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 23, 2000
Elton John Elton John's The Road to El Dorado (Dreamworks 50219) Back in the mid-'70s, it would have been hard to imagine two singer/songwriters who were farther apart artistically than Elton John and Randy Newman. They both sang, played piano and wrote songs, but that was where the similarity ended, for John was one of the most celebrated and successful performers in rock, while Newman's music was so uncommercial that critic Robert Christgau suggested referring to it as "semi-popular music."
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By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
The age of disco was dawning in this week's rundown from Billboard's Hot 100 chart archives. Groovy. 10. "Just Don't Want to Be Lonely," the Main Ingredient This was the Main Ingredient's second biggest hit (1972's "Everybody Plays the Fool" was tops). Fun local-ish fact: Co-writer Vinnie Barrett studied music at Howard University. 9. "The Show Must Go On," Three Dog Night In case you confuse this with the Queen song of the same name, just remember: This one is creepier.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 5, 2000
Elton John is widely known as a rock star, but fewer people probably are aware that in recent years he has devoted much of his energy toward assembling one the world's premier collections of vintage and contemporary photography. John's achievements as a collector are the subject of "Chorus of Light: Photographs from the Sir Elton John Collection," an exhibit currently on view at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. The show is accompanied by a handsome catalog published by the museum in association with Rizzoli International Publications.
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Lori Sears and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
I'll admit it from the get-go: I'm an Elton John nut. I love the man, his music, his melodies, his voice. So let me start not at the beginning, but at the end of last night's concert at the packed Verizon Center in Washington. When the show was over, I started replaying the highlights of the concert in my head. And I began thinking of the songs that he didn't play. I wasn't dwelling out of regret or disappointment, but rather out of amazement. He could have played another three-hour concert of the songs that he didn't perform.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 26, 1993
DUETSElton John (MCA 10926)They say two heads are better than one. But two singers? Frankly, that depends on the pairing. Take Elton John's "Duets." When he's joined by performers eager to meet him on his own terms -- singers like k.d. lang, for example, whose input helps kick "Teardrops" into high gear, or George Michael, who takes the melodrama of "Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me" as seriously as John does -- the music sparkles. It's a shame there isn't more of that kind of chemistry here; for the most part, the album's most entertaining moments tend more toward such cast-against-type novelties as John getting down with Don Henley on the Temptations tune "Shakey Ground," or hearing a reprise of "Don't Go Breaking My Heart" with RuPaul in the Kiki Dee role (which, campy as it may be, is still more listenable than Dee's duet on "True Love")
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 18, 1995
Although rock and roll, as Danny & the Juniors sagely observed, is definitely here to stay, rock stars rarely are.Most big-name rockers enjoy just a few years at the top before making the inevitable slide down the charts. A lucky few, like Eric Clapton or Paul Simon, manage to hold onto the mass audience for 20 years or more, but most are happy to hold onto the sort of small-but-loyal following that has supported Van Morrison and Joni Mitchell all these years. It may not be heavy rotation on MTV, but it sure beats the oldies circuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Doug Gill and J. Doug Gill,Special to The Sun | July 22, 1994
While their status as rock 'n' roll legends is unequaled, it's been a few years since Billy Joel and Elton John have made records that lived up to that reputation.Therefore, when the duo teamed up to co-headline a multi-city stadium tour, it didn't sound like an exciting way to spend a summer evening.After all, couplings of this sort are often no more than a blase showcase of "greatest hits" -- a promotional tool for selling CD boxed sets. While that may not be such a bad thing, it can make for a long night.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 21, 1992
Back when the name Elton John was synonymous with Top-40 success, most critics argued that it was not the singer who mattered but the songs -- that for all his shameless showmanship and peacock plumage, Elton's strengths as a tunesmith far outpaced his abilities as a performer.Maybe so, but that certainly wasn't the case at the Merriweather Post Pavilion Saturday night. If anything, the opposite was true, for from the lush grandeur of "Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me" to the Stones-style savagery of "Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting," it was the musicianship, not the song selection, that ultimately stole the show.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 14, 2009
Guy Graham Babylon, a Grammy Award-winning musician and former New Windsor resident, who was a keyboardist with Elton John's band for more than 20 years, died of arrhythmia Sept. 2 at Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, Calif. He was 52. Mr. Babylon, who had been a member of the North Baltimore Aquatic Club when in high school and still enjoyed competitive swimming, was stricken while swimming and was pronounced dead later at the nearby hospital. Elton John, who was unable to attend Mr. Babylon's funeral that was held Sept.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 31, 1997
LONDON -- Call him Sir Elton.Rock star Elton John, 50, whose singing of "Candle in the Wind" broke hearts and raised hopes at the funeral of Britain's Princess Diana late this summer, receives a knighthood in the New Year Honors List published today.For weeks, there was speculation the flamboyant rocker would headline the list of honors recipients drawn up by Queen Elizabeth II, Prime Minister Tony Blair and assorted British government ministries.The honors -- nearly a thousand of them -- range from lordships to such designated initials as MBE, for Member of the Order of the British Empire.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2011
It's been 40 years since Elton John first performed in Baltimore, and a decade since he performed in the city proper. On Saturday, he'll return with a show at 1st Mariner Arena , where he'll play some of his greatest hits. But the show will also find John rejuvenated in ways he hasn't been on previous tours, even with Billy Joel in Washington two years ago. That's because he'll play selections from his new album, "The Union," where he exhibits the kind of swagger that brought him prominence and a legion of American fans in his first stateside tours in the 1970s.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 14, 2009
Guy Graham Babylon, a Grammy Award-winning musician and former New Windsor resident, who was a keyboardist with Elton John's band for more than 20 years, died of arrhythmia Sept. 2 at Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, Calif. He was 52. Mr. Babylon, who had been a member of the North Baltimore Aquatic Club when in high school and still enjoyed competitive swimming, was stricken while swimming and was pronounced dead later at the nearby hospital. Elton John, who was unable to attend Mr. Babylon's funeral that was held Sept.
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By Kathleen Clary Miller | May 12, 2008
HUSON, Mont. - When my husband and I retired and moved from Southern California to the Missoula, Mont., area, we imagined a quiet existence in a corner of the country that doesn't make national news. The local paper covers stories about whether to allow Hooters to build on a busy street corner, the reconstruction of a dam that threatens trout fishing season, and who can shoot wild turkeys on whose property. Ahh, the simple life, out of the media glare! But suddenly Missoula is a regular in the national headlines.
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By Richard Cromelin and Richard Cromelin,Los Angeles Times | January 2, 2007
The 2006 concert landscape looked a bit like a pop music rest home, shaped for the most part by artists who have been at it for three decades and more, according to the 2006 North America tour rankings released by the trade magazine Pollstar. The Rolling Stones and Barbra Streisand topped the list, and the Top 20 was littered with old-timers, including Elton John, Billy Joel, the Who, Def Leppard, Journey and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. And the biggest thing on the 2007 horizon? A reunion of Genesis, featuring Phil Collins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SARAH MARSTON | June 29, 2006
Aimee Mann gives an acoustic performance with Amy Correia at 9 tomorrow night at Rams Head Live. Doors open at 7 p.m. Mann has a storytelling musical style inspired by The Band, Elton John and Rod Stewart. Rams Head Live is at 20 Market Place. For tickets, Call 410-244-1131 or visit ramsheadlive.com. Mann also plays at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at the Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave. in Alexandria, Va. For those tickets, call 410-547-SEAT or go to ticketmaster.com.
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By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | September 23, 2005
Aida - not the opera by Giuseppe Verdi, but a rock musical by Elton John - is the current production at Toby's Dinner Theatre. The show is a tragedy about doomed lovers in ancient Egypt. s Dinner Theatre, 5900 Symphony Woods Road, Columbia, presents Aida through Nov. 20. Information or reservations: 410-730-8311 or 800- 888-6297.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 23, 1999
If you really want to understand what "Elton John and Tim Rice's Aida" is, start by looking at what it's not.First of all, "Aida" is not a rock opera. True, it draws from the same story that gave us Verdi's opera about the doomed love affair between the Egyptian general Radames and the Nubian slave girl Aida. But as rewritten by Tim Rice and Elton John -- the same team that gave us Disney's "The Lion King" -- this "Aida" has no arias and no triumphant march, just a string of plot-related pop songs.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 13, 2002
There's no danger that anyone is going to mistake Elton John and Tim Rice's Aida for Verdi's opera. And that's not necessarily a bad thing. This Disney-backed show takes a tragic Italian opera and turns it into a pop Broadway musical - and a slick one at that. There's a driving Europop beat in much of John's music, and touches of updated humor in the book by Linda Woolverton, David Henry Hwang and Robert Falls (who does double duty as director). After an abortive 1998 Broadway tryout in Atlanta, Disney fired the show's original director and designer and brought in Falls, Hwang and designer Bob Crowley.
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By Randy Lewis and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2004
By name, he's Prince again, but on the concert trail he was king. Prince's Musicology tour grossed $87.4 million in 2004, tops among concert attractions in North America, according to Pollstar magazine. The concert-industry-tracking publication will finalize figures this week for some acts that are on tour through the end of the year, but no one will earn enough in the next few days to dislodge Prince, whose tickets averaged $61.04 on his stops in 69 cities. He also sold more tickets than any other act, more than 1.4 million.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 13, 2002
There's no danger that anyone is going to mistake Elton John and Tim Rice's Aida for Verdi's opera. And that's not necessarily a bad thing. This Disney-backed show takes a tragic Italian opera and turns it into a pop Broadway musical - and a slick one at that. There's a driving Europop beat in much of John's music, and touches of updated humor in the book by Linda Woolverton, David Henry Hwang and Robert Falls (who does double duty as director). After an abortive 1998 Broadway tryout in Atlanta, Disney fired the show's original director and designer and brought in Falls, Hwang and designer Bob Crowley.
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