Advertisement
HomeCollectionsElmore Leonard
IN THE NEWS

Elmore Leonard

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank H. Wu and By Frank H. Wu,Special to the Sun | January 12, 2003
When the Women Come Out to Dance, by Elmore Leonard. William Morrow. 240 pages. $24.95. Like his novels, Elmore Leonard's first collection of stories is less literary than cinematic. They could be the scripts for several Hollywood movies. In Leonard's work, he could appear as himself: a famous crime writer pitching a concept to a studio. As one Native American former cop says in a story that in fact has been optioned by Bruce Willis, he was thinking of trying to make it in the business, because he knew another Indian "made it big" even though "the man didn't even talk."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com; Publishers Weekly | May 10, 2009
tuesday Wicked Prey : by John Sandford (Putnam, $27.95) In this thriller, Detective Lucas Davenport must help defend the Republican National Convention from an assault by a group of hired gunmen. Davenport also has to confront his longtime enemy, Randy Whitcomb, who has turned his harbored hatred into a plot against Davenport's family. Cemetery Dance : by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child (Grand Central, $26.99) What appears to be a straightforward case in the stabbing murder of a New York Times reporter evolves into something stranger.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Bill Kent and Bill Kent,Contributing Writer | September 27, 1993
Elmore Leonard's first novel was a western, and he's been writing them ever since.This is the same Elmore Leonard who hit the best-seller lists in 1985 with "Glitz," a gritty, violent, wickedly funny tale of a Florida cop who goes north to chase down the Atlantic City mobsters who killed his former girlfriend.That was a western, too, as is "Pronto," Mr. Leonard's 31st and newest novel. In it, Harry Arno, a 66-year-old Miami Beach bookie (the author turned 66 last year), finds himself double-crossed by his Mafia employers and the FBI, and flees to Italy, with a relentless U. S. Marshal and a Sicilian hit man in pursuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to the Sun | May 15, 2005
The Hot Kid By Elmore Leonard. William Morrow. 282 pages. $25. Considering that the early 1930s was a time of depression, lawlessness and would-be nihilism, it seems altogether fitting that one of the most revered crime writers would take on that period and make it his own. Perhaps there's a better fit for Elmore Leonard, but I'd be hard-pressed to think of one more suited to him than what's depicted in The Hot Kid: a colorful tale of gunslinging heroes,...
NEWS
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 16, 1992
RUM PUNCH.Elmore Leonard.Delacorte.297 pages. $21. Almost no one tells the whole truth (never mind nothing but the truth) in Elmore Leonard's latest crime novel. Almost everyone is scamming or plotting serious evil against almost everyone else. That, of course, is one thing that makes "Rum Punch" such delicious summer reading.Mr. Leonard's latest sideways look at society, like many others including his last, "Maximum Bob," takes place in South Florida, land of endless shopping centers, condos and lowlifes.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 26, 1998
Elmore Leonard, that rare pulp mystery author whose work has been turned successfully into movies, returns to the screen with many members of the same team that produced "Get Shorty," the ebullient tale of Hollywood corruption that starred John Travolta.The new film, "Out of Sight," mostly lives up to the light heart and hip vibe of its predecessor, even if it doesn't strike the same satiric chord. And it certainly doesn't lack for star power. George Clooney, as the crinkly-eyed bank robber Jack Foley, is the sexiest guy on the lam since John Robie the Cat. And as Karen Sisco, the federal marshal who makes it her life's work to track him down, Jennifer Lopez wields sexily slinky powers that are anything but standard-issue.
NEWS
By George Grella | August 25, 1991
MAXIMUM BOB.Elmore Leonard.Delacorte.295 pages. $20. In the course of his long and productive career, Elmore Leonard has been favorably compared to just about every crime writer that reviewers could remember (whether they'd read them or not), with James M. Cain and Dashiell Hammett generally leading the list. Although his work follows in the native American tradition of tough writing in its terse, colloquial style and its wise and wised-up picture of a violent, sinful world, it also displays a certain wacky sympathy for even its worst people and a lively sense of the grotesque.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Haner and By Jim Haner,Sun Staff | January 27, 2002
Tishomingo Blues, by Elmore Leonard. William Morrow. 320 pages. $25.95. Dashiell Hammett may have invented the genre, and Carl Hiaasen might be funnier at it on his best day, but the debate over who's the all-time king of the whack job crime novelists just ended. Living or dead, Elmore Leonard tops 'em all. After dishing up an even three dozen hard-boiled, snub-nosed, fat-lip-and-a-bourbon-shooter best sellers, Leonard now delivers a certifiable masterpiece of such twisted ingenuity that he transcends even his own bad self.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to the Sun | May 15, 2005
The Hot Kid By Elmore Leonard. William Morrow. 282 pages. $25. Considering that the early 1930s was a time of depression, lawlessness and would-be nihilism, it seems altogether fitting that one of the most revered crime writers would take on that period and make it his own. Perhaps there's a better fit for Elmore Leonard, but I'd be hard-pressed to think of one more suited to him than what's depicted in The Hot Kid: a colorful tale of gunslinging heroes,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com; Publishers Weekly | May 10, 2009
tuesday Wicked Prey : by John Sandford (Putnam, $27.95) In this thriller, Detective Lucas Davenport must help defend the Republican National Convention from an assault by a group of hired gunmen. Davenport also has to confront his longtime enemy, Randy Whitcomb, who has turned his harbored hatred into a plot against Davenport's family. Cemetery Dance : by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child (Grand Central, $26.99) What appears to be a straightforward case in the stabbing murder of a New York Times reporter evolves into something stranger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank H. Wu and By Frank H. Wu,Special to the Sun | January 12, 2003
When the Women Come Out to Dance, by Elmore Leonard. William Morrow. 240 pages. $24.95. Like his novels, Elmore Leonard's first collection of stories is less literary than cinematic. They could be the scripts for several Hollywood movies. In Leonard's work, he could appear as himself: a famous crime writer pitching a concept to a studio. As one Native American former cop says in a story that in fact has been optioned by Bruce Willis, he was thinking of trying to make it in the business, because he knew another Indian "made it big" even though "the man didn't even talk."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Haner and By Jim Haner,Sun Staff | January 27, 2002
Tishomingo Blues, by Elmore Leonard. William Morrow. 320 pages. $25.95. Dashiell Hammett may have invented the genre, and Carl Hiaasen might be funnier at it on his best day, but the debate over who's the all-time king of the whack job crime novelists just ended. Living or dead, Elmore Leonard tops 'em all. After dishing up an even three dozen hard-boiled, snub-nosed, fat-lip-and-a-bourbon-shooter best sellers, Leonard now delivers a certifiable masterpiece of such twisted ingenuity that he transcends even his own bad self.
NEWS
By A.M. Chaplin and A.M. Chaplin,Sun Staff | January 24, 1999
TRENDS TOGETHEROne of the great things about Baltimore is that even stores with high hipness quotients are easy to shop in. In more pretentious places, a high HQ is an excuse for dangerously slender sales persons to sneer at customers with low HQs and normal body weight.But that kind of rudeness just won't fly in this city. Thus Oh! Said Rose, at 840 W. 36th St., has modest, unpatronizing salespeople despite clothes and accessories that could make the hearts of even the coolest go pit-a-pat.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 26, 1998
Elmore Leonard, that rare pulp mystery author whose work has been turned successfully into movies, returns to the screen with many members of the same team that produced "Get Shorty," the ebullient tale of Hollywood corruption that starred John Travolta.The new film, "Out of Sight," mostly lives up to the light heart and hip vibe of its predecessor, even if it doesn't strike the same satiric chord. And it certainly doesn't lack for star power. George Clooney, as the crinkly-eyed bank robber Jack Foley, is the sexiest guy on the lam since John Robie the Cat. And as Karen Sisco, the federal marshal who makes it her life's work to track him down, Jennifer Lopez wields sexily slinky powers that are anything but standard-issue.
FEATURES
By Mark Feeney and Mark Feeney,The Boston Globe | June 26, 1994
Garry Wills is the Nixon aficionado's Nixon aficionado: the man who charted that 5 o'clock shadow down to its nubbiest bristle. A quarter of a century after its initial publication, Mr. Wills' "Nixon Agonistes" remains the best book written on the 37th president. Anyone wondering about Mr. Wills' hold on the franchise now that the Trickster has joined the Great Silent Majority in the sky need only turn to the July Esquire for reassurance."He contrived to die in the odor of statesmanship," Mr. Wills begins his assessment of the reaction to Nixon's passing.
FEATURES
By Bill Kent and Bill Kent,Contributing Writer | September 27, 1993
Elmore Leonard's first novel was a western, and he's been writing them ever since.This is the same Elmore Leonard who hit the best-seller lists in 1985 with "Glitz," a gritty, violent, wickedly funny tale of a Florida cop who goes north to chase down the Atlantic City mobsters who killed his former girlfriend.That was a western, too, as is "Pronto," Mr. Leonard's 31st and newest novel. In it, Harry Arno, a 66-year-old Miami Beach bookie (the author turned 66 last year), finds himself double-crossed by his Mafia employers and the FBI, and flees to Italy, with a relentless U. S. Marshal and a Sicilian hit man in pursuit.
FEATURES
By Mark Feeney and Mark Feeney,The Boston Globe | June 26, 1994
Garry Wills is the Nixon aficionado's Nixon aficionado: the man who charted that 5 o'clock shadow down to its nubbiest bristle. A quarter of a century after its initial publication, Mr. Wills' "Nixon Agonistes" remains the best book written on the 37th president. Anyone wondering about Mr. Wills' hold on the franchise now that the Trickster has joined the Great Silent Majority in the sky need only turn to the July Esquire for reassurance."He contrived to die in the odor of statesmanship," Mr. Wills begins his assessment of the reaction to Nixon's passing.
NEWS
By A.M. Chaplin and A.M. Chaplin,Sun Staff | January 24, 1999
TRENDS TOGETHEROne of the great things about Baltimore is that even stores with high hipness quotients are easy to shop in. In more pretentious places, a high HQ is an excuse for dangerously slender sales persons to sneer at customers with low HQs and normal body weight.But that kind of rudeness just won't fly in this city. Thus Oh! Said Rose, at 840 W. 36th St., has modest, unpatronizing salespeople despite clothes and accessories that could make the hearts of even the coolest go pit-a-pat.
NEWS
By Todd Grimson and Todd Grimson,Los Angeles Times | September 13, 1992
WHITE JAZZ.James Ellroy.Knopf.320 pages. $22. "White Jazz" is bebop noir, hard-boiled stream-of-consciousness playing changes on all our accumulated memories and fantasies of the criminal universe, tapping into our collective image-bank fed by movies, literature, and true-crime tabloid exposes. James Ellroy's new novel moves at such a feverishly clipped, telegraphic pace that it may be somewhat impenetrable to the uninitiated. For those who get it, however, it will be clear that he has truly crossed over beyond the "crime novel."
NEWS
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 16, 1992
RUM PUNCH.Elmore Leonard.Delacorte.297 pages. $21. Almost no one tells the whole truth (never mind nothing but the truth) in Elmore Leonard's latest crime novel. Almost everyone is scamming or plotting serious evil against almost everyone else. That, of course, is one thing that makes "Rum Punch" such delicious summer reading.Mr. Leonard's latest sideways look at society, like many others including his last, "Maximum Bob," takes place in South Florida, land of endless shopping centers, condos and lowlifes.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.