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By RAFAEL ALVAREZ | May 2, 1993
Lexington, Miss.-- Trying to describe the music of Elmore James, someone said the other day, is like trying to describe a primary color.A color that screams your name as you walk by.That cries all night long.And bleeds.Not just on you, but through you.All the way through to the other side.The color is blue.Electric blue.And it came down in buckets when the great Elmore James opened his mouth."When Elmo played the blues you could feel a chill going over you," remembers guitarist Jimmy Spruill, who made records with James in the 1950s.
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By Hartford Courant | July 6, 1993
Just as crucial to a pleasurable summer road trip as proper packing and a tuned-up auto is the perfect car tape.Rather than rely on radio in unknown expanses of the country, or commercial tapes of albums with a couple good songs and a lot of same-sounding filler, music lovers have for years used home tape decks to concoct their own perfect song selection.And a good tape will last several trips and be an interesting loan to friends (who will not necessarily follow your every musical turn of the road with the same enthusiasm)
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By Hartford Courant | July 6, 1993
Just as crucial to a pleasurable summer road trip as proper packing and a tuned-up auto is the perfect car tape.Rather than rely on radio in unknown expanses of the country, or commercial tapes of albums with a couple good songs and a lot of same-sounding filler, music lovers have for years used home tape decks to concoct their own perfect song selection.And a good tape will last several trips and be an interesting loan to friends (who will not necessarily follow your every musical turn of the road with the same enthusiasm)
NEWS
By RAFAEL ALVAREZ | May 2, 1993
Lexington, Miss.-- Trying to describe the music of Elmore James, someone said the other day, is like trying to describe a primary color.A color that screams your name as you walk by.That cries all night long.And bleeds.Not just on you, but through you.All the way through to the other side.The color is blue.Electric blue.And it came down in buckets when the great Elmore James opened his mouth."When Elmo played the blues you could feel a chill going over you," remembers guitarist Jimmy Spruill, who made records with James in the 1950s.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 29, 1992
Time was when a record company would only put together a boxed-set-collection if it was dealing with the work of a major artist.Someone like Bob Dylan. Or Eric Clapton. Or Miles Davis. Or Muddy Waters. Or James Borwn.Giants, one an all. Now, of course, we know that boxed sets aren't just a means of paying tribute to a means of paying tribute to a great musician--they're also a way to make money. Perhaps that's why it now seems as if any pop star with a big enought back catalog and relatively fervent fans has a boxed set of some sort in the stores.
NEWS
March 29, 1999
Lillian Shedd McMurry, 77, who stumbled on a cache of old blues records in 1949 and was so taken by the pure, haunting sound that within a year she had opened a recording studio, died March 18 at a hospital near her home in Jackson, Miss.As the founder of Trumpet Records, she had been the first to record two giants of the Delta blues, Sonny Boy Williamson and Elmore James.Pub Date: 3/29/99
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | February 26, 1993
Holly Springs,Miss. -- TWO or three times a month, the phone rings in R.L. Burnside's little farmhouse on Highway 4; calls from strangers asking if they can stop by to talk about the blues.The last time Mr. Burnside's phone jumped with a curious ring, the callers were pilgrims from Baltimore."Sure, I remember you," said the 66-year-old guitarist who learned his lessons by watching Mississippi Fred McDowell and Muddy Waters. "Come on over."I had met "Rule" Burnside once before, when he played at the Cat's Eye Pub on Thames Street in May 1986.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 13, 1994
"Clapton plays the blues."Not exactly stop-the-presses news, is it? After all, Eric Clapton has been playing the blues (or something like them) since he started making records some 29 years ago with the Yardbirds. In that time, he's paid tribute to everyone from Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters to Albert King and Robert Cray, building a reputation as one of English rock's premier bluesmen in the process.So it probably seems silly to say there's anything novel about the all-blues approach he adopts for "From the Cradle" (Reprise 45735, arriving in stores today)
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Sun Staff | October 19, 2003
When it comes to affairs of the heart, science is always playing catch-up to art. This week researchers and social psychologists published a report that tells us what poets and blues singers have known all along: It hurts to be rejected -- really hurts. You probably already knew that the sinking feeling in your gut and the emotional pain that makes it seem as if your heart is about to implode were not just your imagination. As it turns out, that was your anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)
NEWS
By Janita Poe and Janita Poe,Chicago Tribune | January 5, 1993
CHICAGO -- Valerie Wellington, 33, known for her feisty renditions of "Million Dollar Secret," "Let the Good Times Roll" and "Sweet Home, Chicago," died Saturday of an aneurysm at Loyola University in Maywood, Ill.She was a latecomer to blues music, but Ms. Wellington -- through her stomp-and-shout nightclub performances, stage portrayals of blues greats like Bessie Smith and raucous romp through a popular Chicago Tribune commercial -- played a key role...
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 29, 1992
Time was when a record company would only put together a boxed-set-collection if it was dealing with the work of a major artist.Someone like Bob Dylan. Or Eric Clapton. Or Miles Davis. Or Muddy Waters. Or James Borwn.Giants, one an all. Now, of course, we know that boxed sets aren't just a means of paying tribute to a means of paying tribute to a great musician--they're also a way to make money. Perhaps that's why it now seems as if any pop star with a big enought back catalog and relatively fervent fans has a boxed set of some sort in the stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 26, 1993
Because bluesman R. L. Burnside hails from a small town in north Mississippi, a lot of listeners automatically assume that his music is an example of the Delta blues -- the legendary strain that produced Charlie Patton, Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters and Elmore James.This doesn't really bother Burnside -- "I kind of feel like the blues is just the blues, you know?" he says, good-naturedly -- but he does try to put people straight on the subject. "This country hill blues," he explains over the phone from his home near Holly Springs, Miss.
NEWS
June 13, 2004
Clothing store seeks girls ages 7 to 17 for annual campaign Go Girl Garbs, a Westminster clothing store for children and young adults, is holding its third annual search to find girls ages 7 to 17 with stories about their ambitions or accomplishments that help spread the idea of empowerment. Open interviews for the 2005 Go Girls will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and June 26 in the store at 13 Liberty St. Alternate times will be by appointment. Eight girls will be chosen to have their stories told through a photo essay designed to inspire others.
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