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Ellis Island

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By -- The (Trenton, N.J.) Times | September 25, 1990
THEY WERE astonishing people, these ancestors of yours and ours, who passed through Ellis Island in the past century on their way to new lives in America.Courage the immigrants possessed above all else. They left home, family, friends, everything they had known, and cast off aboard crowded ships for a New World where they believed they would find the freedom to go as far as their talents and their determination would allow.Husbands left wives and children behind, not knowing how long it might be before they could earn enough money to send for them.
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NEWS
By Tony Glaros | October 25, 2013
Wedded to the mantra that money is better spent on experiences than on the latest roll-out from Apple, we visited Ikaria, the deliciously isolated and funky island in the Aegean Sea. It so happened that all four of my grandparents were born on this hardscrabble terrain between 1890 and 1895, before landing at Ellis Island. From the time I was small, for my amusement and enjoyment, they indulged my fantasies about this dusty gem, a 35-minute flight from the capital city of Athens, but within sight of the coast of Turkey.
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NEWS
By Nora Frenkiel | September 10, 1990
The photograph that appeared yesterday in The Sun with an article about Ellis Island was credited incorrectly. Sun photographer Jed Kirschbaum took the photo.The Sun regrets the error.Like the anisette biscuits she bakes, the stories Reparata DeAntoniis tells at her kitchen table in East Baltimore are both bitter and sweet.There is still the flavor, these six decades later, of the suffering of that journey she undertook on June 3, 1928, leaving her home in Abruzzi, Italy, for a new country and the man she had married, who lived in Baltimore's Little Italy.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and Th | September 10, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be acquainted, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: FESTSCHRIFT English is a promiscuous language that bears traces of every other language that ever spent the night. Or, if you prefer a gentler metaphor, some foreign words are naturalized without getting their names changed at Ellis Island.  One such word is festschrift (pronounced FEST-schrift)
NEWS
By Judy Reilly and Judy Reilly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 1999
"GIVE ME YOUR tired, your poor," has welcomed immigrants to this country for decades.Last week, at Northwest Middle School, seventh-graders got a closer look at the meaning of those words when the media center at the school was transformed into "Northwest Island," a simulation of the Ellis Island experience.The "immigrants" came to the island carrying newborn babies or mementos from home. They wore long fringed shawls, babushkas and black boots, or bathrobes and summer sandals to create the appearance of a newcomer to this country at the turn of the century.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 27, 1990
NEW YORK -- The three of us step off the ferry into a frozen sunlight and feel a little uncertain. Is this a kind of religious pilgrimage, or merely a visit to a stranger's family attic? The ferry ride took 10 minutes. But it's transported us back to another time, in search of people we've lost along the way.My mother and my cousin and I have come to Ellis Island to look for lost artifacts of ourselves. Like a hundred million others in this country, we have ancestors who came through these doors in the early part of this century with tags around their necks, and not much in their hands, as little pieces of this great migration in human history.
NEWS
By Paul H. Johnson and Paul H. Johnson,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 17, 2000
HACKENSACK, N.J. -- Artemio Hernandez spends his days by the water. Every afternoon, the wiry and energetic 87-year-old Cuban takes the subway to Battery Park from his Upper West Side home to watch the ships pass by and to admire the Statue of Liberty. "I go there to remember my younger days," said Hernandez, who likes to remember the days when he lived in the South Ferry section of Manhattan 60 years ago, after he first came to the United States as a stowaway, huddled in the hold of a passenger ship.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 22, 1998
NEW YORK - An icy blast of wind chilled the huddled masses on the ferry heading for Ellis Island. These latter-day pilgrims were not seeking the portal to a new land, only clues to the vanished world of their ancestors.Once on shore, Ray Batcheller, a 71-year-old retired business executive from San Dimas, Calif., timidly approached the information booth. "Do you have an alphabetical listing of the people who came through here?" he asked.His mother had emigrated from Ireland "in the mid to late 1800s," he said, and he wanted to learn more about where she came from.
NEWS
By Charles Davant and Charles Davant,HEARST NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 1997
WASHINGTON - Ellis Island, the port of entry for 12 million immigrants, and Congressional Cemetery, America's first national burial ground, are among the U.S. historic places most threatened by neglect, according to a leading preservation organization.The National Trust for Historic Preservation put them on its list of America's 11 most endangered sites - those threatened by development, vandalism and neglect - which it has published every year since 1988.The trust is a nonprofit organization chartered by Congress in 1949.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 29, 1992
MORONG, Philippines -- The boat people from Vietnam were the first huddled masses to arrive, joined by waves of Cambodians, Laotians and a sprinkling of Hmong longing to breathe free.And now it was Tran Thi Minh Chau's turn, packing her things one afternoon recently, ready to leave with her family in the morning for the United States.Her children are Amerasians, offspring of U.S. soldiers during the Vietnam War, the last wave of Indochinese refugees moving through a sprawling, sun-drenched camp in the Philippines that has become a kind of Asian Ellis Island.
NEWS
January 10, 2012
In the minds of some people today, immigration is a bad word ("Immigrants key to reaching mayor's population goal," Jan. 7). Overlooked is the fact that a half century ago, residents of Canton, Highlandtown, Locust Point and Curtis Bay were either immigrants or sons/daughters of immigrants. However, those immigrants were technically immigrants - they arrived at the front doors of the United States through Ellis Island or the foot of Broadway. They did not sneak in. Some even had to pay a bond or someone paid the bond for them.
EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | December 26, 2011
100 Years Ago A Look back at 1911 • Baseball was getting very popular, but airplanes were still thought of as just for racing and sport. • Popular books in early 1900s were "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz," by Frank Baum, "Up From Slavery," by Booker T. Washington and "The Call of the Wild," by Jack London. • The first ever yellow pages and comic books were published. • Newcomers were flooding into America with the highest one day total coming in 1911 at Ellis Island, N.Y., of 11,745 immigrants.
NEWS
October 12, 2010
Monday's debate between Gov. Martin O'Malley and former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. was quite instructive, and no more so for me than when Mr. O'Malley used the term "new Americans" to describe illegal aliens not only residing in Maryland but throughout the nation and his support for a "comprehensive" solution to the problem favored by the Democrats and the Obama administration. Leave it to a Democrat to get it wrong on essentially all levels. So, according to Mr. O'Malley and Mr. Obama and "Democrat logic," anyone arriving in our country by hook or by crook is automatically a "new American," and that designation is rationalized by using the tired and boring saw that, hey, we're all immigrants, in fact we're a nation of immigrants.
NEWS
July 6, 2007
JOHNNY FRIGO, 90 Jazz musician Johnny Frigo, a versatile jazz violinist and bassist who toured with Jimmy Dorsey and wrote a jazz standard recorded by Billie Holiday and Sarah Vaughan, died Wednesday at a Chicago hospital after battling cancer in recent years, said his son Rick. Mr. Frigo was born on Chicago's South Side and spent much of his career playing bass. After playing with the Coast Guard band at Ellis Island during World War II, he toured with Mr. Dorsey and his orchestra. Around that time, according to the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, Mr. Frigo co-wrote "Detour Ahead," a song that became a jazz standard recorded by Ms. Holiday and Ms. Vaughan, among others.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 12, 2006
THE SPOT WHERE HULL STREET meets the south Baltimore waterfront played an important role in American history, but you'd never know it just by glancing around. It doesn't have the powerful land mass of Federal Hill, or the well-preserved buildings of Fort McHenry. Not even a plaque to explain its significance. But what this area lacks in artifacts, it more than compensates for in authenticity. This stretch of Locust Point is the place where nearly 2 million men, women and children from other countries first arrived by boat to the United States from the early 1800s to 1914.
NEWS
January 23, 2005
Recreation Bureau offers trips to New York, D.C. The Carroll County Bureau of Recreation offers trips to New York and other regional locations. Scheduled trips include: Big Apple One Day Bus Trips from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m.: Trips are planned for April 2, May 7 and July 23. The bus drops travelers off at Bryant Park behind the New York Public Library to spend the day as they wish. The recreation office can offer assistance in day planning. The cost is $49. The bureau will hold a workshop, "Planning the Perfect New York Trip," from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. March 10 in the meeting room of the County Office Building, 225 N. Center St. The cost is $10 and includes a New York City map. La Cage Aux Folles from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. March 16: This bus trip goes to the Marquis Theatre in New York to see the play.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 27, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The immigrant ancestors of countless Americans first set foot on American soil at Ellis Island, N.Y. Or so they thought -- until yesterday, when the Supreme Court said maybe not.Now, many families may have to insert a footnote in their album: Their forebears might have arrived in New Jersey, not New York. Ellis Island, it turns out (at least as a legal matter), is in both states.Ellis Island, an enclave of memory-filled and history-encrusted land and buildings lying in New York harbor a mile off Manhattan, was the entry point for more than 12 million immigrants.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2004
Wolfgang Heinz Kahle, a retired lithographer and accomplished gardener, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at Ivy Manor Chestnut Assisted Living. The Ellicott City resident was 91. Born in Sangerhausen, Germany, near the Harz Mountains, he was orphaned at the age of 6 when his father, a soldier, was killed in World War I. His mother died in the 1918 influenza pandemic. A grandmother who had immigrated to Philadelphia tried to bring him to the United States, but immigration quotas prevented him and an older brother from coming until 1926.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | May 11, 2003
MOTHER'S DAY is different for me this year. My mother died last spring at age 90 and was independent, active and relatively healthy until the very end. Her story embodies so much of Baltimore, and, in many ways, America itself. Her parents came to the United States separately, but both from a German-controlled area of Poland. They were part of the 19th century wave of European immigration that predated Ellis Island -- when Baltimore was the main Atlantic point of entry. These were the people who helped this country heal itself after four horrible years of brutal civil war and made possible its transformation into a world power.
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