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By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2005
NEW YORK -- If you're a woman in Baltimore who's been around for any length of time, chances are you own clothes by Ellen Tracy. The classic designer label has been a staple in Baltimore closets for decades -- worn to luncheons, bar mitzvahs and business interviews by sophisticated women who have a keen sense of style, not an obsession with fashion. But as other younger, hipper labels climbed their way up in the fashion world, Ellen Tracy took somewhat of a back seat. Retailers and customers alike quietly grumbled about its "department store" feel.
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NEWS
September 14, 2005
NATIONAL Roberts says Roe is `settled' From the opening moments of the second day of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge John G. Roberts Jr., Roe v. Wade and the right to privacy it was built on was a topic of conversation between the 50-year-old nominee and the committee members. Roberts called the landmark 1973 abortion rights case "settled as a precedent of the court." [Page 1a] Bush takes blame for relief President Bush took responsibility yesterday for federal government mistakes in dealing with Hurricane Katrina and suggested the calamity raised broader questions about the government's ability to handle both natural disasters and terror attacks.
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FEATURES
By Marylin Johnson and Marylin Johnson,COX NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 1998
NEW YORK -- If there's one designer who'll reliably offer women clothes that make sense in the workplace, it's the braintrust behind the Ellen Tracy label, Linda Allard.Top executives from Saks Fifth Avenue, Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, and Parisian who attended the Fall/Winter '98 Ellen Tracy runway preview Tuesday morning were shown suits and separates that weren't too short or too sheer, too clingy or too casual to peddle in good conscience.Allard didn't indulge in the fashion folly some of her counterparts have thus far during Fashion Week, which continues through tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2005
NEW YORK -- If you're a woman in Baltimore who's been around for any length of time, chances are you own clothes by Ellen Tracy. The classic designer label has been a staple in Baltimore closets for decades -- worn to luncheons, bar mitzvahs and business interviews by sophisticated women who have a keen sense of style, not an obsession with fashion. But as other younger, hipper labels climbed their way up in the fashion world, Ellen Tracy took somewhat of a back seat. Retailers and customers alike quietly grumbled about its "department store" feel.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
When women decided to go to work en masse in the 1970s and had nothing to wear, Ellen Tracy came to the rescue. Ellen Tracy is no super-feminist, symbol of women's rights - or even a real person. It's the label of a fashion house that was savvy enough to realize that being a career woman didn't necessarily have to mean dressing like a man. To many, Tracy became their best friend - albeit a pricey one. And if they looked behind the labels of those well-cut jackets and skirts, they'd find a fellow working woman named Linda Allard.
NEWS
By Patricia Wen and Patricia Wen,Boston Globe | January 24, 1999
It's a problem that has countless women grumbling in store dressing rooms across America and catalog retailers like Eddie Bauer, L.L. Bean, and Lands' End complaining bitterly about millions of dollars in merchandise returns.In the chaotic world of women's clothing sizes, the numbers that shoppers see on garment tags, from tiny 2 all the way to 20, have become all but meaningless.Women waste hours trying on clothes that droop or squeeze, and catalog vendors end up with costly returns from similarly frus- trated mail-order customers.
FEATURES
By Judith Forman and Judith Forman,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1998
Seeing DotsBindi dots have been worn between the eyebrows of Indian women for more than 1,500 years. Bindi body art has been spotted in stores across America since August.The small, jeweled, self-adhesive decals are part of the body art craze that includes piercings, tattoos and henna stains."They're the nonpainful way to have body adornments," says Liz Coughlin, spokeswoman for Naturelle, a Connecticut company that sells packages of 16 dots in four designs for $7.99. (They're available at Sally Beauty Supply Stores and other retailers.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | April 2, 2000
Fudging hair color Fudge paint-box hair color is bluer than blue, redder than red. And among the junior-high set, the semi-permanent, super-bright color, which comes in a rainbow of shades, is also cooler than cool. Yet it comes with a few drawbacks, judging from the directions on the back of the tube, which are filled with all sorts of warnings. Semi-permanent? That depends. "May last up to 40 washes," the tube says. Easy to use? Perhaps. "Warning: Color will stain clothing, bedding and skin."
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Fashion Editor | November 22, 1998
Fashion designers are a grateful bunch. In between setting trends, planning shows and running companies, they pause and reflect like the rest of us around this time of year. We caught up with some and posed this question: "What are you most thankful for from the world of fashion?"Patrick Robinson:The first thing that pops into my mind is that I'm able to have a platform to express my artistic self and my inner soul. That is something a lot of other people never get the chance to do.Nicole Miller:I'm most thankful that these days anything goes - from heels to flats, long skirts or short skirts, colors and prints.
NEWS
September 14, 2005
NATIONAL Roberts says Roe is `settled' From the opening moments of the second day of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge John G. Roberts Jr., Roe v. Wade and the right to privacy it was built on was a topic of conversation between the 50-year-old nominee and the committee members. Roberts called the landmark 1973 abortion rights case "settled as a precedent of the court." [Page 1a] Bush takes blame for relief President Bush took responsibility yesterday for federal government mistakes in dealing with Hurricane Katrina and suggested the calamity raised broader questions about the government's ability to handle both natural disasters and terror attacks.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
When women decided to go to work en masse in the 1970s and had nothing to wear, Ellen Tracy came to the rescue. Ellen Tracy is no super-feminist, symbol of women's rights - or even a real person. It's the label of a fashion house that was savvy enough to realize that being a career woman didn't necessarily have to mean dressing like a man. To many, Tracy became their best friend - albeit a pricey one. And if they looked behind the labels of those well-cut jackets and skirts, they'd find a fellow working woman named Linda Allard.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | April 2, 2000
Fudging hair color Fudge paint-box hair color is bluer than blue, redder than red. And among the junior-high set, the semi-permanent, super-bright color, which comes in a rainbow of shades, is also cooler than cool. Yet it comes with a few drawbacks, judging from the directions on the back of the tube, which are filled with all sorts of warnings. Semi-permanent? That depends. "May last up to 40 washes," the tube says. Easy to use? Perhaps. "Warning: Color will stain clothing, bedding and skin."
NEWS
By Patricia Wen and Patricia Wen,Boston Globe | January 24, 1999
It's a problem that has countless women grumbling in store dressing rooms across America and catalog retailers like Eddie Bauer, L.L. Bean, and Lands' End complaining bitterly about millions of dollars in merchandise returns.In the chaotic world of women's clothing sizes, the numbers that shoppers see on garment tags, from tiny 2 all the way to 20, have become all but meaningless.Women waste hours trying on clothes that droop or squeeze, and catalog vendors end up with costly returns from similarly frus- trated mail-order customers.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Fashion Editor | November 22, 1998
Fashion designers are a grateful bunch. In between setting trends, planning shows and running companies, they pause and reflect like the rest of us around this time of year. We caught up with some and posed this question: "What are you most thankful for from the world of fashion?"Patrick Robinson:The first thing that pops into my mind is that I'm able to have a platform to express my artistic self and my inner soul. That is something a lot of other people never get the chance to do.Nicole Miller:I'm most thankful that these days anything goes - from heels to flats, long skirts or short skirts, colors and prints.
FEATURES
By Judith Forman and Judith Forman,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1998
Seeing DotsBindi dots have been worn between the eyebrows of Indian women for more than 1,500 years. Bindi body art has been spotted in stores across America since August.The small, jeweled, self-adhesive decals are part of the body art craze that includes piercings, tattoos and henna stains."They're the nonpainful way to have body adornments," says Liz Coughlin, spokeswoman for Naturelle, a Connecticut company that sells packages of 16 dots in four designs for $7.99. (They're available at Sally Beauty Supply Stores and other retailers.
FEATURES
By Marylin Johnson and Marylin Johnson,COX NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 1998
NEW YORK -- If there's one designer who'll reliably offer women clothes that make sense in the workplace, it's the braintrust behind the Ellen Tracy label, Linda Allard.Top executives from Saks Fifth Avenue, Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, and Parisian who attended the Fall/Winter '98 Ellen Tracy runway preview Tuesday morning were shown suits and separates that weren't too short or too sheer, too clingy or too casual to peddle in good conscience.Allard didn't indulge in the fashion folly some of her counterparts have thus far during Fashion Week, which continues through tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | November 6, 1997
NEW YORK -- The third day of designer fashion week here ended with fireworks. Todd Oldham, a toothy Texan who has no truck with minimalism, put on a show that had the fashion pack sitting up straight and tapping toes to the runway beat.Show is the operative word here. Many beautiful clothes are being presented by the more than 50 designers who show this week, but many of them need to be seen wearer-close and not at runway distance to be appreciated. An over-the-top event like Oldham stages gets fashion juices pumping.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | November 9, 1995
ANNA SUIIt's OK to watch the masters, but keeping up with the kids keeps the industry on its toes. Anna Sui is one designer who can take the goofiest downtown look and turn it into a saleable line. She's wise beyond her years.This year, she went to the Wee Kirk in the Vale rectory jumble sale and updated the old WASPY castoffs -- madras bermudas, McMullen linen shifts, Villager blouses and chino separates. She even enlarged and twisted some Pucci prints into a hip new shapes. She pumped up the colors and the patterns and yo!
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | November 6, 1997
NEW YORK -- The third day of designer fashion week here ended with fireworks. Todd Oldham, a toothy Texan who has no truck with minimalism, put on a show that had the fashion pack sitting up straight and tapping toes to the runway beat.Show is the operative word here. Many beautiful clothes are being presented by the more than 50 designers who show this week, but many of them need to be seen wearer-close and not at runway distance to be appreciated. An over-the-top event like Oldham stages gets fashion juices pumping.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | November 9, 1995
ANNA SUIIt's OK to watch the masters, but keeping up with the kids keeps the industry on its toes. Anna Sui is one designer who can take the goofiest downtown look and turn it into a saleable line. She's wise beyond her years.This year, she went to the Wee Kirk in the Vale rectory jumble sale and updated the old WASPY castoffs -- madras bermudas, McMullen linen shifts, Villager blouses and chino separates. She even enlarged and twisted some Pucci prints into a hip new shapes. She pumped up the colors and the patterns and yo!
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