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NEWS
By Joetta M. Cramm and Joetta M. Cramm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2001
Elk Ridge Landing in the early 1700s became a busy tobacco shipping port. The Patapsco River was about 15 feet deep, readily accommodating the sailing ships of the day. Along with tobacco, iron became an important export product at the Landing. The era of the iron industry began with a 1743 patent (a document proving ownership) for a 6 1/2 -acre property called "Caleb and Edward's Friendship." The land, patented by a Caleb Dorsey, would become an iron furnace. At the Maryland State Archives in Annapolis are "journals," or ledgers, from Caleb Dorsey Jr.'s store, dated 1758-1772.
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BUSINESS
By Brad Schleicher and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Brad Schleicher and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun reporters | January 13, 2008
In the late 1600s, when colonists sailed inland along the Patapsco River, a port sprang up just below a ridge that was inhabited by a number of elk. The area was called the "Ridge of Elk," while the port became known as Elk Ridge Landing. Today, Elkridge has an identity just as unique. According to Kevin Doyle, former president of the Elkridge Community Association and co-chair of the Route 1 Revitalization Task Force, there is a strong sense of community in the area, despite the fact that the town is bisected by Interstate 95. "The location is a blessing and a downfall," he says.
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NEWS
By Joetta M. Cramm and Joetta M. Cramm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2001
Long ago, herds of elk roamed the ridge of land overlooking the Patapsco River that people came to call the "Ridge of Elk." By far this is the oldest settled part of Howard County, reaching back to the late 17th century. More than 150 years before the new county, Howard, was formed in 1851, what is now Elkridge was part of upper Anne Arundel County. Tax records of 1702 mention an "Elk Ridge Hundred," designating about 100 families for tax purposes and protection by a militia. This may be the first formal use of the name "Elk Ridge."
NEWS
June 28, 2004
The Elk Ridge Heritage Society Ltd. received a $2,500 matching grant from the Columbia Foundation and is seeking funds to match it. The grant will help pay for repairs to the society's headquarters, Brumbaugh House, at 5825 Main St. in Elkridge. Dr. Benjamin Bruce Brumbaugh, an Elkridge family physician for 61 years, delivered generations of "Brumbaugh babies," said by some to be half the babies in Elkridge. Now the society hopes those former babies will step forward with donations equal to their ages, to help preserve Brumbaugh's house and memory.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2004
Virginia L. Sandlass, a local historian and former member of numerous civic groups, died Tuesday of a heart attack at St. Agnes HealthCare. She was 95 and lived at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. She was born Virginia Allison in Bridgeville, Pa., and grew up in the Pittsburgh area, graduating from Tarentum High School in 1925. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College in 1929 with a degree in English literature and moved to New York City, where she modeled for department stores, worked in a law firm and, in 1932, married Henry L. Sandlass, an architect.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
The Elk Ridge Heritage Society Ltd. received a $2,500 matching grant from the Columbia Foundation and is seeking funds to match it. The grant will help pay for repairs to the society's headquarters, Brumbaugh House, at 5825 Main St. in Elkridge. Dr. Benjamin Bruce Brumbaugh, an Elkridge family physician for 61 years, delivered generations of "Brumbaugh babies," said by some to be half the babies in Elkridge. Now the society hopes those former babies will step forward with donations equal to their ages, to help preserve Brumbaugh's house and memory.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | January 30, 1995
The day I got in touch with Jack Bateman, the winter weather was rainy, raw and blustery. Yet he and friend Todd Robbins had been on top of the annex at Elk Ridge Heritage Society, preparing the roof for reshingling.The oldest shingles they removed were 70 years old.Mr. Bateman is the president of Elk Ridge Heritage Society. He manages a membership of more than 130 and tends to the upkeep and improvements of Brumbaugh House, where the society maintains records and a small museum.The society purchased Brumbaugh House in 1986 from the heirs of Dr. Bruce Brumbaugh, who had been caring for the community's medical needs for more than 40 years when he died.
NEWS
March 11, 1997
ITS BIRTH CERTIFICATE says it is 146 years old, but we know better. Although Howard County will celebrate its sesquicentennial in four years, and although it looks quite a bit younger around the edges, it is older than the official number. Its seeds were planted long before the incorporation year of 1851, when the 251-square-mile landlocked area ceased to become the Howard District of Anne Arundel County and assumed its own identity as Howard County.The county's 18th century roots become evident with just a glance at the old stone buildings on Ellicott City's Main Street that seem out of time and yet provide a perfect counterbalance to Howard's recent decades of development.
BUSINESS
By Brad Schleicher and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Brad Schleicher and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun reporters | January 13, 2008
In the late 1600s, when colonists sailed inland along the Patapsco River, a port sprang up just below a ridge that was inhabited by a number of elk. The area was called the "Ridge of Elk," while the port became known as Elk Ridge Landing. Today, Elkridge has an identity just as unique. According to Kevin Doyle, former president of the Elkridge Community Association and co-chair of the Route 1 Revitalization Task Force, there is a strong sense of community in the area, despite the fact that the town is bisected by Interstate 95. "The location is a blessing and a downfall," he says.
NEWS
By Sally Voris and Sally Voris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 1998
DID YOU SEE THE toxic waste dump at Rockburn Branch Park last year?Made of barrels, with waterfalls and soapsuds, the display at the Haunted Halloween event tilted to one side as wagonloads of thrill-seekers approached.It was probably Rick Lanciotti's best idea, said Ken Webster, a volunteer with Elkridge Adult Athletic Association and an employee of Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks, the two organizations sponsoring the event.Webster points to Lanciotti as the source for the ghoulish ideas used by the athletic association to transform an abandoned property in Rockburn Branch Park into a haunted house.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2004
Virginia L. Sandlass, a local historian and former member of numerous civic groups, died Tuesday of a heart attack at St. Agnes HealthCare. She was 95 and lived at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. She was born Virginia Allison in Bridgeville, Pa., and grew up in the Pittsburgh area, graduating from Tarentum High School in 1925. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College in 1929 with a degree in English literature and moved to New York City, where she modeled for department stores, worked in a law firm and, in 1932, married Henry L. Sandlass, an architect.
NEWS
By Joetta M. Cramm and Joetta M. Cramm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2001
Long ago, herds of elk roamed the ridge of land overlooking the Patapsco River that people came to call the "Ridge of Elk." By far this is the oldest settled part of Howard County, reaching back to the late 17th century. More than 150 years before the new county, Howard, was formed in 1851, what is now Elkridge was part of upper Anne Arundel County. Tax records of 1702 mention an "Elk Ridge Hundred," designating about 100 families for tax purposes and protection by a militia. This may be the first formal use of the name "Elk Ridge."
NEWS
By Joetta M. Cramm and Joetta M. Cramm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2001
Elk Ridge Landing in the early 1700s became a busy tobacco shipping port. The Patapsco River was about 15 feet deep, readily accommodating the sailing ships of the day. Along with tobacco, iron became an important export product at the Landing. The era of the iron industry began with a 1743 patent (a document proving ownership) for a 6 1/2 -acre property called "Caleb and Edward's Friendship." The land, patented by a Caleb Dorsey, would become an iron furnace. At the Maryland State Archives in Annapolis are "journals," or ledgers, from Caleb Dorsey Jr.'s store, dated 1758-1772.
NEWS
By Sally Voris and Sally Voris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 1998
DID YOU SEE THE toxic waste dump at Rockburn Branch Park last year?Made of barrels, with waterfalls and soapsuds, the display at the Haunted Halloween event tilted to one side as wagonloads of thrill-seekers approached.It was probably Rick Lanciotti's best idea, said Ken Webster, a volunteer with Elkridge Adult Athletic Association and an employee of Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks, the two organizations sponsoring the event.Webster points to Lanciotti as the source for the ghoulish ideas used by the athletic association to transform an abandoned property in Rockburn Branch Park into a haunted house.
NEWS
March 11, 1997
ITS BIRTH CERTIFICATE says it is 146 years old, but we know better. Although Howard County will celebrate its sesquicentennial in four years, and although it looks quite a bit younger around the edges, it is older than the official number. Its seeds were planted long before the incorporation year of 1851, when the 251-square-mile landlocked area ceased to become the Howard District of Anne Arundel County and assumed its own identity as Howard County.The county's 18th century roots become evident with just a glance at the old stone buildings on Ellicott City's Main Street that seem out of time and yet provide a perfect counterbalance to Howard's recent decades of development.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | January 30, 1995
The day I got in touch with Jack Bateman, the winter weather was rainy, raw and blustery. Yet he and friend Todd Robbins had been on top of the annex at Elk Ridge Heritage Society, preparing the roof for reshingling.The oldest shingles they removed were 70 years old.Mr. Bateman is the president of Elk Ridge Heritage Society. He manages a membership of more than 130 and tends to the upkeep and improvements of Brumbaugh House, where the society maintains records and a small museum.The society purchased Brumbaugh House in 1986 from the heirs of Dr. Bruce Brumbaugh, who had been caring for the community's medical needs for more than 40 years when he died.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | September 12, 1994
Emory Methodist Church has been sitting on the first curve on Church Road in Ellicott City for more than 200 years.A beautiful stone building with dramatic stained glass windows, its interior shines with dark antique wood. It's a treasure, that's true, but a treasure that its congregation must work hard to maintain.The church's organ, almost 100 years old, has played for church services and weddings, but now the stops are broken and the tone is deteriorating. It needs to be replaced. Ella Mae Hare and the Organ Committee entertained 15 estimates, finally settling on Luley & Associates from Pittsburgh to do the work, to the tune of $75,000.
NEWS
October 21, 2006
A 44-year-old Baltimore man was sentenced yesterday in federal court in Baltimore to more than eight years in prison for the armed robbery of a Baltimore County bank in January. U.S District Judge Catherine C. Blake also ordered Kevin Foster to pay $7,972 in restitution. According to the statement of facts presented at his guilty plea, Foster robbed the M&T Bank in the 800 block of Elk Ridge Landing Road in Elkridge on Jan. 3. Matthew Dolan
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | September 12, 1994
Emory Methodist Church has been sitting on the first curve on Church Road in Ellicott City for more than 200 years.A beautiful stone building with dramatic stained glass windows, its interior shines with dark antique wood. It's a treasure, that's true, but a treasure that its congregation must work hard to maintain.The church's organ, almost 100 years old, has played for church services and weddings, but now the stops are broken and the tone is deteriorating. It needs to be replaced. Ella Mae Hare and the Organ Committee entertained 15 estimates, finally settling on Luley & Associates from Pittsburgh to do the work, to the tune of $75,000.
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