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By Mary Carole McCauley and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 9, 2012
One of Elizabeth Catlett's linotypes could horrify viewers by depicting the aftermath of a lynching, the rope around the victim's neck held taut by the murderers' boots. And in the next room, a statue by Catlett of a mother and child would flood viewers with the memories of a maternal embrace. Catlett's sculptures and prints became symbols of the civil rights movement while championing the dignity and humanity of ordinary people. At the time of her death Monday at age 96 in her home in Cuernavaca, Mexico, she was widely considered one of the most important African-American artists of the 20th century.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 9, 2012
One of Elizabeth Catlett's linotypes could horrify viewers by depicting the aftermath of a lynching, the rope around the victim's neck held taut by the murderers' boots. And in the next room, a statue by Catlett of a mother and child would flood viewers with the memories of a maternal embrace. Catlett's sculptures and prints became symbols of the civil rights movement while championing the dignity and humanity of ordinary people. At the time of her death Monday at age 96 in her home in Cuernavaca, Mexico, she was widely considered one of the most important African-American artists of the 20th century.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 22, 1993
For more than half a century the work of sculptor Elizabeth Catlett has proclaimed the dignity of humankind. An African-American, she has championed the history of her people, but in its universality her work transcends even the noblest of causes.Through the mid-century ascendancy of abstract art her work remained decidedly figurative without becoming dated, partly because her forms, though recognizable, are to some degree abstracted, in the way they look and in what they express.When we look at them, we are seeing more an idea than a depiction.
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By [LIZ ATWOOD] | November 18, 2007
Patricia C. Jessamy, Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy started her legal career in 1974 in Cleveland, Miss., and practiced law in Michigan and Missouri before moving to another "M" state - Maryland - in 1985. In 1995, the Baltimore Circuit Court appointed her the first woman to serve as Baltimore City state's attorney. She successfully ran for re-election in 1998, 2002 and 2006. But while she has been the city's top prosecutor for more than a decade, she also has a soft side, as you can see from her list of must-have items.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 24, 1999
Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold are two African-American artists who have forged significant reputations, Catlett as a sculptor and Ringgold for an art form she created that combines aspects of painting and quilt making.Their works have been shown from coast to coast in this country and internationally, and are included in leading museum collections. Their art reflects their experience as African-Americans and women, yet has a breadth of appeal that knows no barriers.Since early last year, two major shows, one devoted to each artist, have been on separate national tours: "Elizabeth Catlett Sculpture: A Fifty-Year Retrospective" and "Dancing at the Louvre: Faith Ringgold's French Collection and Other Story Quilts."
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By JOHN DORSEY and JOHN DORSEY,SUN ART CRITIC | February 1, 1999
It's impossible to think of a better pairing of artists than Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold. Two separate one-person shows of their work opened side by side at the Baltimore Museum of Art last week, and they have a chemistry that comes from dealing with the same subject matter in strikingly different but equally impressive ways.Seeing the two of them together is like listening to two great voices sing a duet in which the words are different but the melody unites them. The melody in this case is that both are African-American women whose work deals with being African-American and a woman but, at the same time, has a breadth of appeal that knows no boundaries.
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By [LIZ ATWOOD] | November 18, 2007
Patricia C. Jessamy, Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy started her legal career in 1974 in Cleveland, Miss., and practiced law in Michigan and Missouri before moving to another "M" state - Maryland - in 1985. In 1995, the Baltimore Circuit Court appointed her the first woman to serve as Baltimore City state's attorney. She successfully ran for re-election in 1998, 2002 and 2006. But while she has been the city's top prosecutor for more than a decade, she also has a soft side, as you can see from her list of must-have items.
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By Karin Remesch | January 21, 1999
African-American art at BMAFor a look at the spectrum of voices raised by African-American women in the 20th century, view the work of artists Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive at North Charles Street. "Elizabeth Catlett Sculpture: A Fifty-Year Retrospective" and "Dancing at the Louvre: Faith Ringgold's French Collection and Other Story Quilts" are on display Wednesday through April 11. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, until 9 p.m. the first Thursday of each month, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 22, 1993
In 1940, Elizabeth Catlett studied art with American regionalist painter Grant Wood. "He sort of instilled in his students to paint what you know the most about," she said, "and I knew the most about black women and that's what I've been doing ever since."A sculptor, printmaker and native of Washington, Catlett, 73, has won awards from the former Czechoslovakia to Mexico, where )) she lives with her husband, artist Francisco Mora. She has concentrated on blacks, especially women and children, as shown by the exhibit of her work, "Elizabeth Catlett: The Power of Human Feeling," at Morgan State University.
NEWS
February 7, 1999
ELIZABETH CATLETT has been classed as an African-American artist, a woman artist, a Mexican artist, a sculptor and a printmaker. The operative word for this major figure in North American art, born 84 years ago, is artist.So the 50-year retrospective of her work at the Baltimore Museum of Art may qualify as the annual show of African-American talent and themes for Black History Month that has become a fixture of American cultural institution life. But it is also the exploration of a major artist whose work is found in the BMA's permanent collection.
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By JOHN DORSEY and JOHN DORSEY,SUN ART CRITIC | February 1, 1999
It's impossible to think of a better pairing of artists than Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold. Two separate one-person shows of their work opened side by side at the Baltimore Museum of Art last week, and they have a chemistry that comes from dealing with the same subject matter in strikingly different but equally impressive ways.Seeing the two of them together is like listening to two great voices sing a duet in which the words are different but the melody unites them. The melody in this case is that both are African-American women whose work deals with being African-American and a woman but, at the same time, has a breadth of appeal that knows no boundaries.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 24, 1999
Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold are two African-American artists who have forged significant reputations, Catlett as a sculptor and Ringgold for an art form she created that combines aspects of painting and quilt making.Their works have been shown from coast to coast in this country and internationally, and are included in leading museum collections. Their art reflects their experience as African-Americans and women, yet has a breadth of appeal that knows no barriers.Since early last year, two major shows, one devoted to each artist, have been on separate national tours: "Elizabeth Catlett Sculpture: A Fifty-Year Retrospective" and "Dancing at the Louvre: Faith Ringgold's French Collection and Other Story Quilts."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | January 21, 1999
African-American art at BMAFor a look at the spectrum of voices raised by African-American women in the 20th century, view the work of artists Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive at North Charles Street. "Elizabeth Catlett Sculpture: A Fifty-Year Retrospective" and "Dancing at the Louvre: Faith Ringgold's French Collection and Other Story Quilts" are on display Wednesday through April 11. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, until 9 p.m. the first Thursday of each month, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 22, 1993
In 1940, Elizabeth Catlett studied art with American regionalist painter Grant Wood. "He sort of instilled in his students to paint what you know the most about," she said, "and I knew the most about black women and that's what I've been doing ever since."A sculptor, printmaker and native of Washington, Catlett, 73, has won awards from the former Czechoslovakia to Mexico, where )) she lives with her husband, artist Francisco Mora. She has concentrated on blacks, especially women and children, as shown by the exhibit of her work, "Elizabeth Catlett: The Power of Human Feeling," at Morgan State University.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 22, 1993
For more than half a century the work of sculptor Elizabeth Catlett has proclaimed the dignity of humankind. An African-American, she has championed the history of her people, but in its universality her work transcends even the noblest of causes.Through the mid-century ascendancy of abstract art her work remained decidedly figurative without becoming dated, partly because her forms, though recognizable, are to some degree abstracted, in the way they look and in what they express.When we look at them, we are seeing more an idea than a depiction.
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By Colleen Dorsey, b | August 2, 2011
Asante, 29, has worked with all kinds of art forms in all sorts of combinations, including photos, collages, painting, and sculpture. Most recently, she's turned her unique style loose with brightly colored tissue paper. She's been exploring the manifold uses of tissue paper in art for five years now, ever since she found some in her grandmother's basement. Check out her work currently on display in the Material Girls exhibition at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum. Favorite artist?
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 10, 2001
Ellen D. Reeder, a former curator at the Walters Art Museum, has been named director of the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington. Reeder, who was curator of ancient art at the Walters from 1984 to 1999, will assume her new post Monday. Until recently, she was deputy director for art at the Brooklyn Museum of Art in New York, where she was responsible for collections, curatorial activities, exhibits, education, conservation and reference libraries. "I consider it an honor and privilege to serve as director of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and look forward to bringing the work of this exceptional museum to an even larger national and international audience," Reeder said in a statement.
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