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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | August 25, 2006
One day in 1976, Vince Papale was just a schlub with a dream, a 30-year-old, out-of-work teacher who lived for his Philadelphia Eagles. Next thing he knew, he was playing for them. Invincible is a formula film that works, yet another in a series of against-the-odds, inspired-by-true-life sports stories that Disney has made a regular part of its release schedule in recent years. There's no substantial difference between it and every other triumph-over-adversity movie (Miracle, Remember the Titans, The Rookie)
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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Johns Hopkins University won another legal victory Thursday in its attempt to build a research park on farmland previously owned by a woman whose family sued the school, saying she would have opposed the development. A three-judge panel of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals affirmed a Montgomery County Circuit Court's decision that Hopkins's plan to develop the 138-acre Belward Farm complied with the agreement made with Elizabeth Banks in 1989. Banks had sold the land, which had been in her family for more than 100 years, to Hopkins for $5 million, a fraction of its market value.
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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Johns Hopkins University won another legal victory Thursday in its attempt to build a research park on farmland previously owned by a woman whose family sued the school, saying she would have opposed the development. A three-judge panel of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals affirmed a Montgomery County Circuit Court's decision that Hopkins's plan to develop the 138-acre Belward Farm complied with the agreement made with Elizabeth Banks in 1989. Banks had sold the land, which had been in her family for more than 100 years, to Hopkins for $5 million, a fraction of its market value.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
A family that sued Johns Hopkins University over its intent to build high-rise buildings on a gift of land intended for a low-rise campus will appeal a judge's decision to allow the institution to move forward with its plans. In a statement, the relatives of Elizabeth Beall Banks—who with her family sold 108 acres of her family's Belward Farm to Hopkins for $5 million more than 20 years ago—said it would appeal an Oct. 26 ruling by Montgomery County Circuit Court Judge Ronald B. Rubin that removes all restrictions on the development of the property, which Hopkins intends to use for a research institution in Gaithersburg.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
A family that sued Johns Hopkins University over its intent to build high-rise buildings on a gift of land intended for a low-rise campus will appeal a judge's decision to allow the institution to move forward with its plans. In a statement, the relatives of Elizabeth Beall Banks—who with her family sold 108 acres of her family's Belward Farm to Hopkins for $5 million more than 20 years ago—said it would appeal an Oct. 26 ruling by Montgomery County Circuit Court Judge Ronald B. Rubin that removes all restrictions on the development of the property, which Hopkins intends to use for a research institution in Gaithersburg.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 29, 2005
We are tepid voyeurs," Glenn Close bellows, in full Norma Desmond mode, a New York stage diva berating her acting class. "Where is your passion?" She takes her own advice in Heights, a drama set within 24 hours of the lives of artsy New Yorkers. Close is Diana Lee, a wife suffering through yet another failing marriage, with a daughter about to marry Mr. Wrong (she thinks). Close knows she has to give us something to look at because the play's not the thing - not here, anyway. It's all about life in the rarefied air of Manhattan's beautiful strivers, people with the looks, connections and possibilities to be names in New York and unhappily facing that crossroads moment.
EXPLORE
January 29, 2012
now playing "Beauty and the Beast 3D" (G). Re-release of this Disney story in 3D. An prince (Robby Benson) must remain a hideous Beast until he learns to love someone, in particular village girl Belle (Paige O'Hara). TownMall Cinemas (12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:00 p.m.) "Contraband" (R). An ex-smuggler (Mark Wahlberg) has given up his criminal ways, but he's forced back into the game after his brother-in-law (Caleb Landry Jones) botches a drug deal for a crime lord (Giovanni Ribisi)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 14, 2008
Definitely, Maybe imagines a world where happy endings are de rigueur, but getting there is no picnic. As romantic comedies go, that may not exactly qualify as a revelation, but in the hands of writer-director Adam Brooks and his uniformly charming cast, it adds some welcome spice to a genre that rarely ventures beyond the predictable anymore. We've seen it all a hundred times: Couple meets cute, breaks up sad, reunites in the final reel. Only this time, there's one guy and three gals, leaving the film to chronicle three meet-cutes and three breakups, but only one feel-good reunion.
NEWS
By Glenn Whipp and Glenn Whipp,Los Angeles Times | January 30, 2009
The Uninvited offers ironclad proof that Hollywood should give up the ghost already when it comes to remaking Asian horror movies. But really, how many ticket buyers in The Uninvited's targeted teen demographic know - or care - that it can't hold a flickering candle to the South Korean original, Kim Jee-woon's 2003 creep-fest, A Tale of Two Sisters? Where Kim created a deeply unsettling vibe with a sinister house and a host of deeply unhinged characters, The Uninvited settles for a grab bag of horror movie tropes (the heroine sees dead people - and then some!
NEWS
June 24, 2003
Elizabeth M. Slade, a retired department store fashion show organizer, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Dickeyville resident was 90. Born Elizabeth Banks Middleton in New York City and raised in Wakefield, Mass., she attended the old Prince School of Design, a division of Simmons College in Boston. Mrs. Slade was a fashion model and later became a publicity director at Fisher Junior College in Boston. She moved to Baltimore in 1954, when she joined the Hutzler's department store.
EXPLORE
February 12, 2012
now playing "Big Miracle" (PG). A newsman in Alaska (John Krasinski) lands a story that could give him the big break he needs to advance his career. With Drew Barrymore, Kristen Bell and Dermot Mulroney. TownMall Cinemas (2, 4:40, 7:10 p.m.) "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close" (PG-13). Oskar (Thomas Horn), who lost his father (Tom Hanks) in the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center, is convinced that his dad left a final message for him somewhere in New York City.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | August 25, 2006
One day in 1976, Vince Papale was just a schlub with a dream, a 30-year-old, out-of-work teacher who lived for his Philadelphia Eagles. Next thing he knew, he was playing for them. Invincible is a formula film that works, yet another in a series of against-the-odds, inspired-by-true-life sports stories that Disney has made a regular part of its release schedule in recent years. There's no substantial difference between it and every other triumph-over-adversity movie (Miracle, Remember the Titans, The Rookie)
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 29, 2005
We are tepid voyeurs," Glenn Close bellows, in full Norma Desmond mode, a New York stage diva berating her acting class. "Where is your passion?" She takes her own advice in Heights, a drama set within 24 hours of the lives of artsy New Yorkers. Close is Diana Lee, a wife suffering through yet another failing marriage, with a daughter about to marry Mr. Wrong (she thinks). Close knows she has to give us something to look at because the play's not the thing - not here, anyway. It's all about life in the rarefied air of Manhattan's beautiful strivers, people with the looks, connections and possibilities to be names in New York and unhappily facing that crossroads moment.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 30, 2009
Sunday Morning is turning 30, and the CBS mainstay is celebrating this weekend. If you have never seen the program - and sometimes it is the best thing on TV all weekend - think of it as an upbeat newsmagazine with a feel for humor and culture. Sunday, they will be looking at the way the world - including technology, popular culture and religion - has changed since the show made its debut three decades ago with Charles Kuralt as host. These days, it's the forever-in-bow ties Charles Osgood at the helm.
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