Advertisement
HomeCollectionsElixir
IN THE NEWS

Elixir

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | March 7, 1994
Ellicott City resident Barbara Seig's beloved Lhasa-poo Irving is 14 years old -- that's 98 in dog years, right?The elderly Irving has congestive heart failure and needs heavy medication to control it. That's 12 pills a day given to an unwilling canine.Barbara ran through all Irving's favorite foods in an effort to get the pills into him -- ice cream, liverwurst, sausage -- but in the end, Irving became suspicious of food in general: There might be a pill in it!He stopped eating altogether.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Comic operas don't come more endearing than Donizetti's "L'elisir d'amore"  ("The Elixir of Love"). The humor in this rustic tale, which involves a lovesick guy buying a potion (just plain old wine) from a snake-oil salesman to melt the heart of an indifferent woman, still has good miles left on it, as Washington National Opera's lively revival at the Kennedy Center reconfirms. But the tender side of the work is what ultimately counts the most, and that's what this production brings out with particular effectiveness.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 30, 2004
A ranch hand in chaps trying to do rope tricks. A monied country girl in an Annie Oakley outfit. A sergeant who looks like a General Custer wannabe. A snake oil salesman whose accoutrements include a Victrola for occasional musical backup. And a spirited dash of good old-fashioned do-si-do-ing. Sure sounds like an Italian opera to me. Actually, it's not such a stretch, when the opera is Donizetti's eternal charmer, L'elisir d'amore (The Elixir of Love). Early 19th-century Italian rusticity, the plot's original milieu, is hardly the only apt setting for a story about love, flirtation and hucksterism.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | August 29, 2011
Is it just me, or was there actually a time when ethanol was the great, green hope? Didn't Al Gore tell us it would fight global warming through cleaner motor vehicle emissions? Didn't George W. Bush promise this homegrown grain byproduct would reduce U.S. dependence on expensive foreign oil? And even though they had grave misgivings, didn't the folks at the tri-state Chesapeake Bay Commission conclude they had to embrace this political reality and make the best of it? I may have been the only dope who fell for any of this, but the U.S. Senate has set me straight.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | February 2, 2007
Italian 19th-century composer Gaetano Donizetti's The Elixir of Love proves smoothly transportable to Prohibition-era Tennessee in Anne Arundel Community College Opera's version on stage this weekend. Artistic director and opera founder Douglas Byerly and his dedicated cast and crew have something extra to celebrate with this production at the Pascal Center for the Performing Arts -- the 25th anniversary of AACC's fine facility. Judging from the large audience on Saturday, the 5-year-old organization seems well on its way to attracting a new crowd to opera.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 17, 2003
In case the nonsense title with its unpronounceable first word wasn't sufficient warning, along came a box containing: a red-and-gold tinsel garland; a small round metal canister labeled "Simulacrum" and, in turn, containing a pink rubber "Voodoo Man" with a smiley face, two rubber balls with smiley faces, red tinsel and three pages of literature about the Voodoo Man (product specifications, a warning, etc.). The box arrived at the office a few weeks ago. Its contents were promotional material for the current show at the Theatre Project, a rambling, unfocused hodgepodge titled Pferdzwackur's Vampire Nutcracker and produced in cooperation with Towson University's graduate theater program.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2006
HOUSTON -- Washington Redskins quarterback Mark Brunell found a perfect elixir for his rapidly advancing football age yesterday against the hapless Houston Texans at Reliant Stadium. The Redskins, too, might have also discovered their own cure-all for what had been a miserable 0-2 start to the 2006 season. Jaguars @Redskins Sunday, 4:15 p.m., Ch. 9, 1430 AM
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun Reporter | March 31, 2007
ATLANTA -- If there is some sort of elixir, a blueprint or a set of instructions for repeating as national college basketball champions, former Duke forward Thomas Hill coyly hinted that he has it - and he's decided not to share it with Florida. "I'm not going to divulge the secret," Hill said, the crinkle of his smile seemingly audible over the phone this week. "Go, Bruins." Today's national semifinals Ohio State vs. Georgetown, 6:07 p.m.; Florida vs. UCLA, 8:47 p.m. (approximate) TV: Chs. 13, 9
NEWS
By WILLIAM McCLOSKEY | March 26, 1993
Tuesday night at the Lyric Theatre, during a piano rehearsal of the Baltimore Opera's forthcoming production of ''L'Elixir d'Amore'' (''The Elixir of Love''), a very ordinary looking older man with a figure that attested to many good meals removed the coat slung over his shoulders, walked confidently on stage, opened his mouth and filled the auditorium with golden sound.I might as well start with one fact: Carlo Bergonzi, one of the handful of great operatic tenors of our time, was never a glamorous fellow.
NEWS
June 1, 2003
Black voters haven't acted on the basis of race I must concur, in part, with the suggestion in the title of Gregory Kane's column "Search for mayoral hopeful should be colorblind in city" (May 25). However, Mr. Kane does not go quite far enough in sharing the historical record of ethnic voting patterns. If there were a race with some possible justification for voting for members of its own race in America, it could well be African-Americans. It hasn't been that long since we experienced Jim Crow laws, poll taxes and literacy tests.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Tribune Newspapers | November 15, 2009
ROME -- "Mescolati, non agitati" is Italian for "stirred, not shaken," but to me it means a good martini is hard to find here - and in a lot of other places, for that matter. I went looking for one on the last Sunday evening in August, the nadir of the year in Rome. It was hot even at 7 p.m., and everything was closed because Romans linger at the beach as long as they can before returning to town to face September. On the Via Veneto, prime martini territory given its Fellini-esque "La Dolce Vita" connections, lobby bars in the grand hotels were shut tight, and maitre d's in oversize suits beckoned me into sad, empty sidewalk cafes.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | December 27, 2007
I would like to try the cinnamon, lime juice and vinegar combo mentioned in your column for weight loss. What is the recipe? My husband is diabetic, so we just started using cinnamon extract made in the drip coffee-maker. How much lime and vinegar do we need to add? How much should we drink? And is the (shudder) vinegar necessary? Many readers want this recipe, and the person who came up with it agreed to share it in detail. Here is Lisa's Weight Loss Elixir: Put five decaffeinated green tea bags in 5 cups of water and bring to a full boil.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun Reporter | March 31, 2007
ATLANTA -- If there is some sort of elixir, a blueprint or a set of instructions for repeating as national college basketball champions, former Duke forward Thomas Hill coyly hinted that he has it - and he's decided not to share it with Florida. "I'm not going to divulge the secret," Hill said, the crinkle of his smile seemingly audible over the phone this week. "Go, Bruins." Today's national semifinals Ohio State vs. Georgetown, 6:07 p.m.; Florida vs. UCLA, 8:47 p.m. (approximate) TV: Chs. 13, 9
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | February 2, 2007
Italian 19th-century composer Gaetano Donizetti's The Elixir of Love proves smoothly transportable to Prohibition-era Tennessee in Anne Arundel Community College Opera's version on stage this weekend. Artistic director and opera founder Douglas Byerly and his dedicated cast and crew have something extra to celebrate with this production at the Pascal Center for the Performing Arts -- the 25th anniversary of AACC's fine facility. Judging from the large audience on Saturday, the 5-year-old organization seems well on its way to attracting a new crowd to opera.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 22, 2006
DETROIT -- Next door to Comerica Park sits St. John's Episcopal Church, where an electronic sign beckons with bright orange letters, "Pray here for the Tigers." The plea should erase any doubt that religion and baseball intersect sharply in the Motor City. But the role sports plays - the role the Tigers play - can be a bit tougher to dissect. The electricity that flowed through the stadium for last night's World Series opener was evident - so evident, in fact, that first glance would lead you to believe it lit up the whole neighborhood.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2006
HOUSTON -- Washington Redskins quarterback Mark Brunell found a perfect elixir for his rapidly advancing football age yesterday against the hapless Houston Texans at Reliant Stadium. The Redskins, too, might have also discovered their own cure-all for what had been a miserable 0-2 start to the 2006 season. Jaguars @Redskins Sunday, 4:15 p.m., Ch. 9, 1430 AM
NEWS
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 21, 2001
After a 72-hour programming binge, Derek Fugasu and his team of software developers had hit a wall. They had to deliver a working model of a hopelessly botched e-commerce engine in 16 hours, and some team members were beginning to babble. At 4 a.m., long after the Santa Monica, Calif., bars once favored by upscale Internet workers have locked up, Fugasu dragged himself down the street into the shock-white lighting of an all-night 7-Eleven. "Gimme all your Red Bull," he said to the clerk, handing over nearly $150 in cash for three cases of the soda.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | October 23, 2003
They booed her. In June at the intimate Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis, Meshell Ndegeocello gave a funky but strictly businesslike performance, the first of two that night. Several folks strolled in fashionably late, of course, and missed most of the 45-minute set. So when Meshell said "Good night" and dashed off the stage trailed by her young, small, multi-racial band, some audience members gave each other quizzical looks. "She's done?" asked the stunned, theatrical-looking woman at my table.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 30, 2004
A ranch hand in chaps trying to do rope tricks. A monied country girl in an Annie Oakley outfit. A sergeant who looks like a General Custer wannabe. A snake oil salesman whose accoutrements include a Victrola for occasional musical backup. And a spirited dash of good old-fashioned do-si-do-ing. Sure sounds like an Italian opera to me. Actually, it's not such a stretch, when the opera is Donizetti's eternal charmer, L'elisir d'amore (The Elixir of Love). Early 19th-century Italian rusticity, the plot's original milieu, is hardly the only apt setting for a story about love, flirtation and hucksterism.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.