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Elise Ray

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NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 2000
IT IS SAID that only 6 degrees of separation exist between any two people on Earth. It works like this: Your friend knows someone who knows someone on the other side of the globe - and so on. In six steps, the saying goes, each of us can be connected to all the people in the world. This week, children attending Fulton Elementary discovered that they were only one step away from Olympic gymnast Elise Ray. Sally Swygert, a Fulton parent, has known the Ray family for years. Elise Ray attended Wilde Lake High School.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2010
The Olympic medal that was within reach a decade ago will finally be in the grasp of the U.S. women's gymnastics team, and with it will come vindication and the bragging rights that should have been theirs in Sydney. For a brief time this week, Elise Ray, Dominique Dawes, Amy Chow, Jamie Dantzscher, Kristen Maloney and Tasha Schwikert will be allowed to enjoy what power plays and bickering stole from them in 2000. They will be reunited with their coach, Kelli Hill, who stood with them and for them when expectations and pressures threatened to crush their spirits.
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SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2000
HOUSTON - Gymnast Elise Ray keeps a curious calendar. April 20-25: Spend Easter in New Zealand. Win the all-around at an international competition. May 5: Senior prom at the Inner Harbor. Today: Travel to Texas for a training session at Bela Karolyi's camp. Ray will graduate from WildeLake High next month, but she is not your typical "Junebug." The 18-year-old is attempting to win a berth on the U.S. Olympic women's team that will compete in Australia in September, and the intensity will only increase between now and the Olympic trials, which is Aug.15-20 in Boston.
SPORTS
January 27, 2005
Moves Baseball DEVIL RAYS: Agreed to terms with P Doug Waechter, P Scott Kazmir and P Chris Seddon on one-year contracts. INDIANS: Agreed to terms with former Orioles OF Darnell McDonald on minor league contract. Named Jason Lee Pacific rim scout. MARINERS: Agreed to terms with IF Yuniesky Betancourt on four-year, $2.826M contract. Designated P Aaron Looper for assignment. NATIONALS: Agreed to terms on one-year contract with P Tony Armas Jr. RED SOX: Traded P Doug Mientkiewicz to Mets for 1B Ian Bladergroen.
SPORTS
By Stan Rappaport and Stan Rappaport,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
Elise Ray doesn't need to get a life. She already has two. During the school day, Ray is a senior at Wilde Lake High School in Columbia. For much of the rest of her time, Ray is a gymnast -- a very good gymnast. Ray was eighth in the all-around at the 1999 world championships, the best finish by a U.S. woman since Dominique Moceanu's fifth-place standing in 1995. She is perhaps the best female gymnast in the country and considered a top medal hope in the Summer Olympics, which begin Sept.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
The sports world is full of stories about teen athletes deprived of their youth by overzealous coaches and overbearing parents ... of the joy of sport being replaced by the intense pressure to succeed. Maybe that's why U.S. gymnastics champion Elise Ray is such an appealing Olympic story. It takes tremendous commitment to become one of the best athletes in the world, but Ray - the 18-year-old Columbia resident who swept through the nationals and the Olympic trials to establish herself as the nation's top women's gymnast - has proved that you don't have to sacrifice your life to pursue your dream.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2000
So that she could soar in Sydney, Elise Ray spent a couple of days of down time at her home in Columbia. The women take center stage tonight at the U.S. Gymnastics Championships in St. Louis, the first of two competitions that will be weighed in the selection of the American Olympic team. As the highest U.S. finisher in the all-around at last year's world championships, Ray walks in with strong status and none of the weakness that caused one of her knees to wobble in early June. "Training has gone really well," she said during a telephone interview Tuesday night before a walk-through at the Kiel Center.
NEWS
September 22, 2000
Uplifting: U.S. gymnast Elise Ray (above on balance beam) perseveres after falling on a vault set at the wrong height. [Page 1e] Track: American Marion Jones begins her Drive for Five golds, winning a preliminary heat in the 100-meter dash. [Page 1e]
NEWS
August 2, 2000
ELISE RAY was about to take second place in the all-around at the U.S. Gymnastics Championships in St. Louis Saturday night. She was a sliver behind the defending champion, Kristen Maloney, and facing her weakest event, the vault. She was a few weeks past surgery removing bone chips from her knee. Before her second vault, the June graduate of Wilde Lake High School in Columbia went to the officials' table. They thought she was going to ask to go to the bathroom. No, she wanted to tell them she was changing to a more difficult vault, one she had never attempted in competition before.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 26, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - Elise Ray never imagined the Olympics would be like this, the stuff of struggles endured instead of dreams achieved, of feeling a pop in her shoulder on a first routine and making one last tiny misstep on the balance beam. No one could have predicted that the 18-year-old from Columbia would storm down a runway at breakneck speed and fly over a vault that was set 2 inches too low and fail to land on her two feet. And few could have foreseen the turmoil that engulfed her team, with officials squabbling and the U.S. team failing to gain an Olympic gymnastics medal for the first time since 1972.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2004
Event by event, gymnast Courtney Kupets is building a case -- for her coach, Kelli Hill. When U.S. Olympic Committee officials meet in Texas from July 13 to 18 to select the women's team going to Athens, Greece, they also will select a head coach. Usually, the honor goes to the coach with the hottest athlete, and right now, that's Kupets. The 17-year-old from Gaithersburg is the two-time U.S. all-around champion. With her first-place finish at the Olympic trials last weekend in Anaheim, Calif.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2001
ACCORDING TO the "The Guinness Book of World Records," the musical "Cats" may hold the record for the longest-running musical show on Broadway and in London. Stevens Forest Elementary School has its own long theatrical span to boast about. Physical education teacher Barry Palmer has been directing the school's musicals since 1981 - the year "Cats" opened in London. Palmer, who has taught at Stevens Forest since 1973, was inspired by a performance put on by third-graders in 1979 and wanted to do something similar that would involve the whole school.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 2000
IT IS SAID that only 6 degrees of separation exist between any two people on Earth. It works like this: Your friend knows someone who knows someone on the other side of the globe - and so on. In six steps, the saying goes, each of us can be connected to all the people in the world. This week, children attending Fulton Elementary discovered that they were only one step away from Olympic gymnast Elise Ray. Sally Swygert, a Fulton parent, has known the Ray family for years. Elise Ray attended Wilde Lake High School.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 26, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - Elise Ray never imagined the Olympics would be like this, the stuff of struggles endured instead of dreams achieved, of feeling a pop in her shoulder on a first routine and making one last tiny misstep on the balance beam. No one could have predicted that the 18-year-old from Columbia would storm down a runway at breakneck speed and fly over a vault that was set 2 inches too low and fail to land on her two feet. And few could have foreseen the turmoil that engulfed her team, with officials squabbling and the U.S. team failing to gain an Olympic gymnastics medal for the first time since 1972.
NEWS
September 22, 2000
Uplifting: U.S. gymnast Elise Ray (above on balance beam) perseveres after falling on a vault set at the wrong height. [Page 1e] Track: American Marion Jones begins her Drive for Five golds, winning a preliminary heat in the 100-meter dash. [Page 1e]
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
The sports world is full of stories about teen athletes deprived of their youth by overzealous coaches and overbearing parents ... of the joy of sport being replaced by the intense pressure to succeed. Maybe that's why U.S. gymnastics champion Elise Ray is such an appealing Olympic story. It takes tremendous commitment to become one of the best athletes in the world, but Ray - the 18-year-old Columbia resident who swept through the nationals and the Olympic trials to establish herself as the nation's top women's gymnast - has proved that you don't have to sacrifice your life to pursue your dream.
SPORTS
January 27, 2005
Moves Baseball DEVIL RAYS: Agreed to terms with P Doug Waechter, P Scott Kazmir and P Chris Seddon on one-year contracts. INDIANS: Agreed to terms with former Orioles OF Darnell McDonald on minor league contract. Named Jason Lee Pacific rim scout. MARINERS: Agreed to terms with IF Yuniesky Betancourt on four-year, $2.826M contract. Designated P Aaron Looper for assignment. NATIONALS: Agreed to terms on one-year contract with P Tony Armas Jr. RED SOX: Traded P Doug Mientkiewicz to Mets for 1B Ian Bladergroen.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2000
BOSTON - Columbia gymnast Elise Ray had just accepted the crystal trophy and the bouquet of flowers that came with her place on the newly selected U.S. Olympic women's gymnastics team when national team coordinator Bela Karolyi unexpectedly handed her something a little heavier. The mantle of leadership. The six-woman team that emerged from the U.S. Olympic Gymnastic Team Trials at Boston's FleetCenter includes two Olympic veterans - Amy Chow and Silver Spring's Dominique Dawes - but Karolyi didn't hesitate when he was asked who might fill an apparent leadership gap. He chose an 18-year-old with great competitive credentials and no Olympic experience.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2000
Ellen Ray hadn't packed a stitch yesterday afternoon, though she, her husband, Bill, her mother and son are leaving today to spend 14 days in Sydney, Australia. The couple's passports weren't in the "important papers" folder yet, and Ray hadn't walked her trusty 11-year-old neighbor through the cat-feeding and plant-watering tasks he'll be doing while they are gone. The house in Columbia's Hickory Ridge village was unusually quiet for the day before a big trip, and that's the way the Rays like it. No hoopla.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2000
BOSTON - Columbia gymnast Elise Ray had just accepted the crystal trophy and the bouquet of flowers that came with her place on the newly selected U.S. Olympic women's gymnastics team when national team coordinator Bela Karolyi unexpectedly handed her something a little heavier. The mantle of leadership. The six-woman team that emerged from the U.S. Olympic Gymnastic Team Trials at Boston's FleetCenter includes two Olympic veterans - Amy Chow and Silver Spring's Dominique Dawes - but Karolyi didn't hesitate when he was asked who might fill an apparent leadership gap. He chose an 18-year-old with great competitive credentials and no Olympic experience.
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