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Elisabeth Shue

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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The sinner who is "The Saint" and the saint who is his co-star came here to attract attention to that movie on which, for both of them, much rides.For him, it's a chance to prove that he can carry a big movie without wearing a bat cape; for her it's a chance to consolidate after the triumph of "Leaving Las Vegas."She's very angular; he's very unangular. She's got a profile; he's got a blur. Both are blond; neither is very big. He eats Bagel Chips and smokes Merits while he talks and literally wears rose-colored glasses; she eats a fruit salad.
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By Gina Piccalo and Gina Piccalo,Los Angeles Times | June 3, 2007
Elisabeth Shue took a deep breath. It was still early in the media push for her new film Gracie, an indie drama based on her own soccer-obsessed youth, and she clearly was still grappling with what she called the "sacredness" of her past, the "nerve-racking" aspect of making it public. The film, which opened Friday, tells the story of a feisty 15-year-old girl (played by Carly Schroeder) growing up in a middle-class home in late-1970s New Jersey. She's the only daughter in a family of three sons, and after her eldest brother dies, she competes on a boys' soccer team to win her father's approval.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 4, 1997
There's too much plot and not enough story in "The Saint." It's one of those big, busy things that doesn't quite work: Every two minutes a baffling new character enters, speaks in a heavy Russian accent and tilts the movie in some unfathomable direction. You sit there waiting for something not to happen, for a moment of repose, so you can add it all up.The movie re-creates the famous Leslie Charteris character, the elegant, unflappable, bemused professional thief Simon Templar, played previously by slick cads Roger Moore and George Sanders.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun movie critic | June 1, 2007
Gracie is painfully earnest, which might be OK were it not also painfully trite, painfully cliched and painfully formulaic. It doesn't help that the film is based on the real-life adolescence of its star and co-producer, Elisabeth Shue, because then the question becomes: Why not tell her story straight-out, sans embellishment? At least that would have had the ring of truth, as opposed to this contrived, if sincere, mess. Gracie (Picturehouse Entertainment) Starring Carly Schroeder, Dermot Mulroney, Elisabeth Shue.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun movie critic | June 1, 2007
Gracie is painfully earnest, which might be OK were it not also painfully trite, painfully cliched and painfully formulaic. It doesn't help that the film is based on the real-life adolescence of its star and co-producer, Elisabeth Shue, because then the question becomes: Why not tell her story straight-out, sans embellishment? At least that would have had the ring of truth, as opposed to this contrived, if sincere, mess. Gracie (Picturehouse Entertainment) Starring Carly Schroeder, Dermot Mulroney, Elisabeth Shue.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 4, 2000
There are bad movies, and then there are movies so offensive, so aggressively witless, so objectionable on so many grounds they leave the viewer speechless. Count "Hollow Man" among the latter. Kevin Bacon plays a young scientist who discovers how to make things invisible in this aptly named movie, a mish-mash of pseudo-science, sexism and gore that no doubt has Claude Rains spinning - tastefully, of course - in his grave. It's no surprise when Bacon's character, Sebastian Caine, injects himself with a drug to make himself disappear, nor does it come as a shocker when this arrogant, leering little brat uses his newfound powers to mess with people's minds and sexually molest a colleague.
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By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 9, 2005
A poetic fable that takes a subtle approach to an explosive subject, Gregg Araki's Mysterious Skin takes the viewer to bucolic Hutchinson, Kan., where one fateful sunny day two 8-year- olds are playing in a Little League game. Dark-haired, self-confident Neil (Chase Ellison), the star player, has become aware that he is different and that the immediate object of his attraction is the team's coach (Bill Sage). Sometime after that, the coach takes Neil home and cunningly takes advantage of the situation.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 20, 1998
A common complaint in cinematic circles is how difficult it is to get a movie made these days. "Palmetto" suggests that it might be all too easy.Someone could have told screenwriter E. Max Frye to go back to his day job. Volker Schlondorff's better angels might have deterred the director, whose credits include the searingly powerful war drama "The Tin Drum," from attaching himself to Frye's ridiculous script. The agents, new-best-friends and pool boys that serve as gurus to the stars might have advised such promising talents as Woody Harrelson, Elisabeth Shue, Gina Gershon, Chloe Sevigny and Michael Rapaport to pass.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 30, 1996
"The Trigger Effect" begins with a riveting, unsettling sequence that's like a dissection of social pathology. Wordlessly, it watches a game of hostility tag, a process by which a single accidental jostle is alchemized into angst and is passed along from person to person, contaminating each of them with generalized anger, in a shopping mall.That guns and blades don't come out, that a race riot, a domestic meltdown, a collapse of civilization doesn't immediately ensue seems merely the most fragile of coincidences and the least likely of outcomes: That's how close to the edge, the movie seems to be saying, we really live.
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By Vicki Hengen and Vicki Hengen,BOSTON GLOBE | March 3, 1996
Several weeks ago, an old friend from college reported that she'd met, at a party in New York, the graphic designer of Ray Gun."Cool," I said. "Did you hit him?""No," she replied. "But I wanted to."Personality and party etiquette aside, what we were referring to, in code, was the fact that we consider this particular guy to have single-handedly ruined the art of magazine layout and typography for those of us who actually want to read the words.A hyper-happenin', music-and-pop-culture mag, Ray Gun always has been the kind of thing you've got to read upside down and sideways -- and even then, it may not make sense.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 9, 2005
A poetic fable that takes a subtle approach to an explosive subject, Gregg Araki's Mysterious Skin takes the viewer to bucolic Hutchinson, Kan., where one fateful sunny day two 8-year- olds are playing in a Little League game. Dark-haired, self-confident Neil (Chase Ellison), the star player, has become aware that he is different and that the immediate object of his attraction is the team's coach (Bill Sage). Sometime after that, the coach takes Neil home and cunningly takes advantage of the situation.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 4, 2000
There are bad movies, and then there are movies so offensive, so aggressively witless, so objectionable on so many grounds they leave the viewer speechless. Count "Hollow Man" among the latter. Kevin Bacon plays a young scientist who discovers how to make things invisible in this aptly named movie, a mish-mash of pseudo-science, sexism and gore that no doubt has Claude Rains spinning - tastefully, of course - in his grave. It's no surprise when Bacon's character, Sebastian Caine, injects himself with a drug to make himself disappear, nor does it come as a shocker when this arrogant, leering little brat uses his newfound powers to mess with people's minds and sexually molest a colleague.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 20, 1998
A common complaint in cinematic circles is how difficult it is to get a movie made these days. "Palmetto" suggests that it might be all too easy.Someone could have told screenwriter E. Max Frye to go back to his day job. Volker Schlondorff's better angels might have deterred the director, whose credits include the searingly powerful war drama "The Tin Drum," from attaching himself to Frye's ridiculous script. The agents, new-best-friends and pool boys that serve as gurus to the stars might have advised such promising talents as Woody Harrelson, Elisabeth Shue, Gina Gershon, Chloe Sevigny and Michael Rapaport to pass.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 4, 1997
There's too much plot and not enough story in "The Saint." It's one of those big, busy things that doesn't quite work: Every two minutes a baffling new character enters, speaks in a heavy Russian accent and tilts the movie in some unfathomable direction. You sit there waiting for something not to happen, for a moment of repose, so you can add it all up.The movie re-creates the famous Leslie Charteris character, the elegant, unflappable, bemused professional thief Simon Templar, played previously by slick cads Roger Moore and George Sanders.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The sinner who is "The Saint" and the saint who is his co-star came here to attract attention to that movie on which, for both of them, much rides.For him, it's a chance to prove that he can carry a big movie without wearing a bat cape; for her it's a chance to consolidate after the triumph of "Leaving Las Vegas."She's very angular; he's very unangular. She's got a profile; he's got a blur. Both are blond; neither is very big. He eats Bagel Chips and smokes Merits while he talks and literally wears rose-colored glasses; she eats a fruit salad.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 30, 1996
"The Trigger Effect" begins with a riveting, unsettling sequence that's like a dissection of social pathology. Wordlessly, it watches a game of hostility tag, a process by which a single accidental jostle is alchemized into angst and is passed along from person to person, contaminating each of them with generalized anger, in a shopping mall.That guns and blades don't come out, that a race riot, a domestic meltdown, a collapse of civilization doesn't immediately ensue seems merely the most fragile of coincidences and the least likely of outcomes: That's how close to the edge, the movie seems to be saying, we really live.
NEWS
By Gina Piccalo and Gina Piccalo,Los Angeles Times | June 3, 2007
Elisabeth Shue took a deep breath. It was still early in the media push for her new film Gracie, an indie drama based on her own soccer-obsessed youth, and she clearly was still grappling with what she called the "sacredness" of her past, the "nerve-racking" aspect of making it public. The film, which opened Friday, tells the story of a feisty 15-year-old girl (played by Carly Schroeder) growing up in a middle-class home in late-1970s New Jersey. She's the only daughter in a family of three sons, and after her eldest brother dies, she competes on a boys' soccer team to win her father's approval.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 6, 1990
Films going into production:''The Dark Half'' (Dark Half Productions). Shooting in Pittsburgh. Horror maven George Romero is executive producer, screenwriter and director of this chiller starring Tim Hutton, Amy Madigan, Michael Rooker and Julie Harris. Hutton plays an author whose life, along with his murderous subjects, is shown in detail.''Soapdish'' (Paramount). Shooting in New York. Sally Field, Kevin Kline, Whoopi Goldberg, Robert Downey Jr. and Elisabeth Shue all star in this look at a soap star (Field)
NEWS
By Vicki Hengen and Vicki Hengen,BOSTON GLOBE | March 3, 1996
Several weeks ago, an old friend from college reported that she'd met, at a party in New York, the graphic designer of Ray Gun."Cool," I said. "Did you hit him?""No," she replied. "But I wanted to."Personality and party etiquette aside, what we were referring to, in code, was the fact that we consider this particular guy to have single-handedly ruined the art of magazine layout and typography for those of us who actually want to read the words.A hyper-happenin', music-and-pop-culture mag, Ray Gun always has been the kind of thing you've got to read upside down and sideways -- and even then, it may not make sense.
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