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Eliot Spitzer

ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
When CNN hired Wolf Blitzer from The Jerusalem Post in 1990 to be its Pentagon correspondent, the first thing his new employers tried to do was "teach" him how to be a TV performer. "They sent me to coaching and voice lessons and all sorts of stuff — it was making me crazy," Blitzer said. "And I remember saying to my wife at the time, 'I'm never going to make this. ... I think I made a huge mistake in taking this job.' " But when Blitzer told his boss, Bill Headline, CNN's Washington bureau chief at the time, about his misgivings, Headline surprised the veteran Middle East correspondent with his answer — "Forget everything.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Watching the debut this week of Al Jazeera America, I couldn't help but remember reviewing the first week of Erin Burnett's show on CNN in October 2011. I say this not to rip Burnett again, but because her attitude toward the Occupy Wall Street protesters in that first week in 2011 offers such a clean snapshot of the difference in orientation between CNN and Al Jazeera America. And it's important to understand that difference, because unlike Fox News and MSNBC, which wave their ideological flags openly, CNN and Al Jazeera America both claim to be doing down-the-middle, straight journalism.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 16, 2005
A former top executive of American International Group in Bermuda, who is described in a lawsuit filed by the New York attorney general's office as having destroyed evidence amid an investigation into AIG, is not expected to face criminal charges by that office, two people briefed on the investigation said. The executive, L. Michael Murphy, was fired by AIG in March for refusing to cooperate with the investigations. In May, the attorney general, Eliot Spitzer, sued AIG and its former top two officers, accusing them of manipulating financial statements and misleading regulators and investors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
Former vice president Al Gore will anchor convention coverage on his Current TV channel, it was announced Wednesday. This is what happens if you own the candy store, I guess. But when was the last time a former Nobel Prize winner sat in the anchor chair at a convention? Gore's presence just made me add Current to the list of channels I will be watching and reviewing. I can hardly wait for the tweets from deposed Current anchor Keith Olbermann. I hope he won't be silenced by pending lawsuits.
FEATURES
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | March 10, 2000
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Nintendo boasts that its video game controller will "take a licking and keep on ticking," but the hands of the children using it have been left blistered and bleeding, according to the New York attorney general. In a case surrounding "Mario Party," Nintendo of America Inc. agreed to ship protective gloves to any of the estimated 1.15 million households in the United States that bought the game, Attorney General Eliot Spitzer said in announcing an out-of-court settlement with the manufacturer.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 21, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Communications Commission has stepped up its investigation of allegations that four of the largest U.S. radio companies took money and gifts to play certain songs after settlement talks stalled. The FCC, led by Chairman Kevin J. Martin, sent letters of inquiry yesterday to Clear Channel Communications Inc., CBS Radio Inc., Entercom Communications Corp. and Citadel Broadcasting Corp., Commissioner Jonathan S. Adelstein said. The letters, which seek facts and documents, address allegations that radio programmers received undisclosed money and gifts from music companies.
BUSINESS
By Pradnya Joshi and Pradnya Joshi,NEWSDAY | January 6, 2005
The head of one of the most influential business lobby groups assailed New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer yesterday for what he called overzealous prosecution of American businesses. Speaking to reporters in Washington, Thomas J. Donahue, president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, said many business prosecutions amounted to "criminalizing honest mistakes and legitimate accounting differences." He said Spitzer and other regulators have trampled on the rights of American businesses by forcing them into settlements.
NEWS
March 12, 2008
When New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer strode to a podium at his New York City office Monday and apologized for unnamed sins, he said he was there to "briefly address a private matter." But Mr. Spitzer's alleged involvement with a prostitution ring, as detailed in federal court papers last week, was far more than a private matter. Not only did he violate the trust of his wife and three daughters, he also is accused of violating the public's trust by patronizing a criminal enterprise he once indignantly railed against as a top law enforcement officer.
BUSINESS
By Mark Skertic and Mark Skertic,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 28, 2003
CHICAGO - Bank One Corp. expects its mutual fund adviser will face "enforcement action" by regulators, the head of the bank's mutual fund group said. "As expected, we have been told to anticipate enforcement action against Bank One's mutual fund adviser," Dave Kundert, president of the company's One Group Mutual Funds, said Wednesday. The company's mutual fund adviser, money management firm Banc One Investment Advisors Inc., is listed as an "indirect subsidiary" of Bank One Corp. "However, we are optimistic that we can avoid regulatory litigation and reach an amicable resolution with the regulators over the next several months," Kundert said.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david. zurawik@baltsun.com | November 21, 2008
As one newsmagazine takes the high road, another goes low. Or, for every action, there is a reaction. As the CBS newsmagazine 60 Minutes scores record ratings with a steady diet of substance and interviews like the one correspondent Steve Kroft did on Sunday with President-elect Barack Obama, ABC's 20/20 tonight features an "exclusive" interview by Diane Sawyer with Ashley Dupre. She's the "high-end call girl" at the center of the scandal that brought down former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer.
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