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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Comcast is making more poor families eligible for a program offering $10-a-month broadband Internet access, and it's offering them a period of free service as part of a back-to-school promotion. Households with past due balances were previously barred from the program, known as Internet Essentials, but they will no longer be if their unpaid bills are more than a year old, according to a blog post on Comcast's website. The Philadelphia-based cable television and Internet service provider also said it would allow families with a "reasonable" amount of debt to pay it off in installments.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The state's Mental Hygiene Administration didn't have adequate procedures to ensure consumers given care were eligible, according to audit by the Department of Legislative Services during fiscal 2013. The state funds in question totaled $16.4 million. The total budget that year was $788 million when federal funds were counted. The audit also found reviews weren't done in a timely manner by an accounting firm hired to monitor some of the agency's fiscal functions, with some reviews taking up to an extra 21 months.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
The NCAA is reviewing the initial eligibility of freshman Maryland basketball guard Sam Cassell Jr., according to a source familiar with the situation. The timetable for a decision is uncertain. Losing Cassell would be a blow to Maryland, which had counted him among a handful of players who comprise one of its best basketball recruiting classes in years. The class has the chance to make a swift impact on a Terps team that was depth-challenged and faded last season, finishing 17-15.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Manny Machado admits that he feared the worst when he fell to the ground at home plate Monday night, holding his right knee and writhing in pain in the batter's box. The moment brought back memories for Machado of last September, when his other knee buckled as he hit first base, ending his year with an injury that required offseason surgery and forced him to miss the first month this season. And even though the Orioles placed their third baseman on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday, the team's diagnosis of a knee ligament sprain was met with relief.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun Staff Writer | January 10, 1995
SAN DIEGO -- The members of the Mid-Eastern AthleticConference could see it coming, but they still don't enjoy being bypassed on the NCAA's road to reform.The 89th annual NCAA convention heated up yesterday with Division I votes on freshman eligibility and other thorny issues related to academic progress.The MEAC, a conference of nine historically black colleges that includes Coppin State, Morgan State and UMES, protested with some counterproposals, which lost in landslides."This is definitely going to widen the gap," UMES athletic director Hallie Gregory said of the difficulties members of the MEAC already have recruiting and competing in Division I. "More importantly, I don't think we're looking out for kids' welfare."
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD | October 26, 1994
Rarely is Ned Sparks critical of the NCAA. But when discussing its initial-eligibility clearinghouse program last week, the state association's executive secretary spoke up."They really dropped the ball on this one," said Sparks, secretary of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association.The central clearinghouse system, which went into effect during the 1993-94 academic year, is designed to assure that colleges nationwide adhere to uniform standards of freshman eligibility.To that end, all prospective college athletes must submit their junior year transcripts to the central clearinghouse and maintain their grades to meet NCAA requirements for freshman eligibility, which include a list of core courses.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | December 22, 2011
Maryland football DB Goins joins Terps , will have 2 years of eligibility Defensive back Isaac Goins has signed a national letter of intent to play for Maryland, Terps coach Randy Edsall announced Wednesday. Goins just completed a stellar two-year run at Contra Costa College in San Pablo, Calif. The 6-foot, 190-pound cornerback was a 2011 first-team All-Bay Valley Conference choice after making six interceptions and also was nominated for all-region honors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser | May 22, 2012
With “The Bachelor” casting call coming up at McHenry Row on June 28, here are a few tips to help you decide if being on the show is right for you. Men and women of ages 21 and older are encouraged to attend the event. But let's get real, not everyone is encouraged to show up. ABC and Warner Bros. have a list of 23 eligibility requirements and here are some things to consider before applying for the show: Am I a convicted felon? Have I been issued a restraining order in the past or am currently issued one?
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun staff | September 14, 2012
Maryland has lost its appeal with the NCAA over the eligibility of Sam Cassell Jr. “We've exhausted every option and made our best effort," Maryland coach Mark Turgeon said in a news release. "I'm very pleased with the work that our compliance staff put in on Sam's behalf. Obviously, we're very disappointed that he will be unable to attend the University of Maryland at this time and be a part of our basketball program. We will continue to support Sam and his family in any way that we can as they determine their next steps.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2011
For the third time since he moved with his father to Florida and enrolled in high school near Orlando, Patrick Downey III's attempt to resume his once-dominant wrestling career was denied Tuesday. Following an often contentious 90-minute session, a four-person panel voted to uphold an earlier ruling by the Florida High School Athletic Association to deny the former North County student's eligibility, meaning he will not be able to participate in wrestling there. William Grant, an attorney hired by Downey's father, immediately asked to have the FHSAA's board of directors meet on the issue within 48 hours.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Comcast is making more poor families eligible for a program offering $10-a-month broadband Internet access, and it's offering them a period of free service as part of a back-to-school promotion. Households with past due balances were previously barred from the program, known as Internet Essentials, but they will no longer be if their unpaid bills are more than a year old, according to a blog post on Comcast's website. The Philadelphia-based cable television and Internet service provider also said it would allow families with a "reasonable" amount of debt to pay it off in installments.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
One of Towson's positions of strength in 2015 should be a midfield that welcomes back three starters in juniors Greg Cuccinello (20 goals and nine assists) and Justin Mabus (10 G, 17 A) and freshman Ryan Drenner (12 G, 10A). That group could be even stronger if Andrew Hodgson returns from injury, and coach Shawn Nadelen said Hodgson, a senior who has one more year of eligibility remaining, is on pace to do just that. “He should be back next year, and that just bolsters our midfield when we return all those guys and get Andrew back in the mix,” Nadelen said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Maryland's health exchange officials say they have contacted all 18,000 people who reported having trouble signing up for insurance through the state's online marketplace before the end of open enrollment in April and added 7,500 people to the rolls. Others enrolled on their own and still more were duplicates, said Alison Walker, a spokeswoman for the exchange. She couldn't say if there were others left who had technical trouble with the glitch-prone site, but she said they'd still be able to enroll.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Maryland is ditching the health insurance exchange it has spent tens of millions in federal and state dollars to develop, and Gov. Martin O'Malley's critics are heaping well-deserved condemnation on him for the debacle. Where they go wrong is in suggesting that he's making the same mistake all over again. Rep. Andy Harris, who has quite correctly sought to remedy the lack of accountability for the system's failure thus far, criticized the governor for adopting Connecticut's system, which he said will cost tens of millions more and be uncertain to work, instead of using the federal government's exchange, which he implied would be free of cost and risk.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Philip Hersh and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Michael Phelps' comeback inched closer to reality Tuesday when his longtime coach said the record-setting Olympian could swim in a meet “sometime soon.” “He looks like he is definitely in shape,” Phelps' coach, Bob Bowman, said. Though Phelps has been non-committal about a return to swimming, he stirred speculation last year when he rejoined the drug-testing pool for international competition. He has also worked out regularly at the North Baltimore Aquatic Club in recent months.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Jon Boyer is probably going to take a lot of heat for this -- we're sorry, Jon. But it's really our duty to report your utter fabulousness and rock-star status as an animal rescuer. Not that the ladies of Baltimore need any reminding, apparently. Homeless and injured animals seem to have something of a magnetic attraction to Boyer, who's a Baltimore police officer. He says police rescue cats and dogs all the time -- comes with the job. But he's a little flummoxed that his occasional drop-off at the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS)
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Staff Writer | September 2, 1993
Five football players have been cleared to participate in Saturday's opener against Virginia, but as part of the process of restoring their eligibility, Maryland admitted to a secondary rules violation that will be addressed by a member of the NCAA infractions committee. No significant penalty, if any, is expected.Superbacks Mark Mason and Doug Burnett, wide receiver Andrew Carter, cornerback Gene Green and defensive lineman Sharrod Mack were cleared to play yesterday by the NCAA, which on Monday was asked by the Maryland athletic department to look into the players being overpaid in an on-campus summer jobs program.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | August 2, 2012
Cornell senior attackman Rob Pannell, one of the favorites to win the 2012 Tewaaraton Award before missing most of the season with a broken left foot, has been granted a fifth year of eligibility by the Ivy League. Pannell suffered the injury in the third quarter of the No. 3 Big Red's 18-7 win over Army on March 3. At the time, he was averaging eight points, with seven goals and nine assists in two contests. He underwent surgery, and after weeks of uncertainty about whether he would return,  academically withdrew from Cornell at the end of the semester, leaving open the option of appealing for a fifth year of eligibility.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Building on the Dream Act approved by voters in 2012, Democrat Anthony G. Brown proposed Thursday that Maryland provide low-interest college loans to the children of workers who are in this country illegally. Brown's proposal came on a busy day in the campaign for governor. One of his Democratic rivals, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, unveiled an economic program. The other, Del. Heather R. Mizeur of Montgomery County, pushed for relief from home foreclosures. On the Republican side, former Ehrlich administration official Larry Hogan told a summit of business leaders in Annapolis that he would improve Maryland's competitiveness by cutting taxes and regulation.
HEALTH
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Attorneys launched a campaign Monday to notify former patients of a Johns Hopkins gynecologist accused of secretly photographing exams that they are eligible to register as part of a class-action suit. As many as 12,600 patients seen by Dr. Nikita Levy between 1988 and 2013 could register as part of the class action, said Jonathan Schochor, chairman of the plaintiffs' committee. If the attorneys are able to reach a monetary settlement with Johns Hopkins Hospital and affiliates, patients who have registered as part of the class-action group will be able to collect a portion of the money, Schochor said.
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